Trunk Pan - Team Camaro Tech
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post #1 of 12 (permalink) Old Apr 20th, 17, 09:52 AM Thread Starter
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Trunk Pan

Hi Guys

I don't know how helpful they are, but here are the pictures of a trunk pan replacement

https://goo.gl/photos/hNBtLrxvPBjtEU3C9

What you are looking at is the one piece of replacement sheet metal in the entire car (due to a leak at the rear window)

I have never done body work, but i looks like a lousy repair job

what they did is to cut out most of the trunk floor and then drop a pan in - the new piece (not clear if it is new...lots of pitting under the paint) has a good sized lip that overlaps the cut out inside the trunk - from there they bondo'd inside the trunk to even out the lip and used tubes and tubes of caulking underneath - it is all mostly rusted under the paint

I guess my questions are this:

should there be that kind of overlap? - if not, is the idea that the new piece fits exactly with the cut out and the 2 pieces are butt-welded and then ground down? if the latter, how to you keep the two pieces together to get tack welds on...are welding magnets strong enough? If it is normal to have it like this, I guess I will still grind it all down to metal and try to get all the surface rust out and then refinish

next, it looks like they plug welded the supports onto the understide of the trunk floor (the pieces the gas tank straps attach to) - on one side they plugged only one edge - again, tubes and tubes of caulking - lot's of rust under the finish - should i just drill those out and start over? - i notice that the ends of the braces are not welded on at all...is that correct?

thanks
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post #2 of 12 (permalink) Old Apr 20th, 17, 02:49 PM
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Re: Trunk Pan

That is a bit of a mess. Best to remove it all and start over. You can't fix stuff like that.

Don

1969 Camaro LSA 6L90E AME subframe and IRS
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post #3 of 12 (permalink) Old Apr 20th, 17, 06:41 PM Thread Starter
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Re: Trunk Pan

Thanks Don

How would you approach it?

If I were to cut from the line on the underside, that would eliminate the lip on the drop in piece and allow for a flush fit...is that the idea you are suggesting?

The pan is surface rusted under the paint, but it is not rotten

can you please walk though a bit of what you would do to remedy this?

thanks
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post #4 of 12 (permalink) Old Apr 21st, 17, 01:42 PM
DT
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Re: Trunk Pan

I would purchase the biggest trunk pan they sell and BUTT weld it in. Trim the new piece first and lay it down in the trunk and trace the outline from the new trimmed piece.

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post #5 of 12 (permalink) Old Apr 21st, 17, 03:24 PM
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Re: Trunk Pan

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Originally Posted by DT View Post
I would purchase the biggest trunk pan they sell and BUTT weld it in. Trim the new piece first and lay it down in the trunk and trace the outline from the new trimmed piece.
X2. Remove the previous repair completely. It is not worth trying to salvage it. Cut everything back to good metal and properly butt weld in a new pan. Looks like you might need new trunk braces too.

Don
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1969 Camaro LSA 6L90E AME subframe and IRS
1969 Camaro vert LS3 4L65E Ridetech level 2
1969 Camaro project
1970 Z28 project - sold
1968 Firebird project
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post #6 of 12 (permalink) Old Apr 21st, 17, 04:24 PM Thread Starter
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Re: Trunk Pan

thanks guys - i figured an overlap like that couldn't be right...

can't say i know how to butt weld...but no time like the present to learn

is there a tip or trick for keeping the entire pan aligned with the existing opening? - perhaps something like this: Intergrip Panel Clamps Set of 4 - Auto Body Panel Clamps - Auto Rotisserie Clamps


or just slap a bunch of hft welding magnets all the way around and tack it from there?

thanks
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post #7 of 12 (permalink) Old Apr 21st, 17, 04:29 PM
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Re: Trunk Pan

Some guys like those clamps but I hate using them. Your idea of the magnets is a good one. You only need a couple of tacks to hold it. Take your time on panel fitting. It will make the butt welding so much easier as will good solid metal.

Lots of good videos on butt welding on YouTube.

Don

1969 Camaro LSA 6L90E AME subframe and IRS
1969 Camaro vert LS3 4L65E Ridetech level 2
1969 Camaro project
1970 Z28 project - sold
1968 Firebird project
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post #8 of 12 (permalink) Old Apr 21st, 17, 04:30 PM
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Re: Trunk Pan

You can use those EW clamps. Also, not knowing if your OCD or not (LOL), I have seen many cars with lap joints. Guys just laid the new trunk piece in with a 1/2 inch ledge all around.

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post #9 of 12 (permalink) Old Apr 21st, 17, 04:33 PM
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Re: Trunk Pan

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Originally Posted by DT View Post
You can use those EW clamps. Also, not knowing if your OCD or not (LOL), I have seen many cars with lap joints. Guys just laid the new trunk piece in with a 1/2 inch ledge all around.
If you do a lap joint it looks a lot better IMHO if you weld it on both sides and use a grinder and Roloc discs to dress the welds.

Don

1969 Camaro LSA 6L90E AME subframe and IRS
1969 Camaro vert LS3 4L65E Ridetech level 2
1969 Camaro project
1970 Z28 project - sold
1968 Firebird project
1969 Z28 factory air project
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post #10 of 12 (permalink) Old Apr 21st, 17, 06:53 PM Thread Starter
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Re: Trunk Pan

lapped is what is in there now...it is a really lousy job...gobs of weld all over the place...a ton of bondo on the top... tubes of seam sealer ... stuff is everywhere...and all rusting under the paint


I think step one is to strip it down and see what's there

then i think it may be a case of cutting out the old and welding in the new

what amazes me is that the supports were welded only on to the trunk but not on to the car at the front and back of the supports...i imagine with a full tank there must have been a pretty buckled floor
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post #11 of 12 (permalink) Old Apr 22nd, 17, 05:10 AM
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Re: Trunk Pan

I did mine a few years back using overlap welds. I realized that butt-welding would be preferred but I also knew my limitations. Zero gap or as little gap as possible is the way to go, and I didn't trust I could get approx 10' of weld prep good enough to weld it up w/o making things worse and creating the need for an even larger opening after screwing it up. That was my rationalization anyway.

I was able to leave the original tank braces in place, and just carefully cut away what was needed. Trimmed the replacement pan to size, held it tight with sheetmetal screws and welded it in, plug welding the pan to the existing tank braces, then welding up the screw holes. A small amt of filler to smooth things out and painted it with epoxy primer and Zolatone. I didn't weld the laps from the bottom side, although I considered it. I seam sealed and carefully removed any excess. It turned out to be a very neat repair, though admittedly not the preferable method.

















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Last edited by BPOS; Apr 22nd, 17 at 05:25 AM.
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post #12 of 12 (permalink) Old Apr 22nd, 17, 06:02 AM
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Re: Trunk Pan

Quote:
Originally Posted by BPOS View Post
I did mine a few years back using overlap welds. I realized that butt-welding would be preferred but I also knew my limitations. Zero gap or as little gap as possible is the way to go, and I didn't trust I could get approx 10' of weld prep good enough to weld it up w/o making things worse and creating the need for an even larger opening after screwing it up. That was my rationalization anyway.

I was able to leave the original tank braces in place, and just carefully cut away what was needed. Trimmed the replacement pan to size, held it tight with sheetmetal screws and welded it in, plug welding the pan to the existing tank braces, then welding up the screw holes. A small amt of filler to smooth things out and painted it with epoxy primer and Zolatone. I didn't weld the laps from the bottom side, although I considered it. I seam sealed and carefully removed any excess. It turned out to be a very neat repair, though admittedly not the preferable method.
Very nicely done.

Don

1969 Camaro LSA 6L90E AME subframe and IRS
1969 Camaro vert LS3 4L65E Ridetech level 2
1969 Camaro project
1970 Z28 project - sold
1968 Firebird project
1969 Z28 factory air project
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