Garage heaters - Team Camaro Tech
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post #1 of 32 (permalink) Old Dec 25th, 00, 08:18 AM Thread Starter
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I've been using a kerosene salamander type heater for the last few years - smelly, noisy, etc. Today I was in the garage beginning another winter project on the '69 and started thinking about a better heating system. What do you folks use and like? At some point I'll be at the paint phase and was wondering about how to heat without a fire hazard. I'd like to keep the warm months for driving, if possible. Thanks.
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post #2 of 32 (permalink) Old Dec 25th, 00, 10:13 AM
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A few years back I borrowed a friend's kerosene jet-engine/salamander type heater. It was smelly, noisy, etc. More recently, I needed one again and I went to the Home Depot and bought my own. Same type of heater but I bought a smaller one. It's actually pretty good and a world of difference from the old one. I think the old one was too large (which generated too much noise) and also badly in need of a tune up - which may have something to do with the smell.

In any event, it works great and there's very little smell. If I could afford it I would install a garage/commercial gas heater - the kind that hang from the ceiling.

However, you really can't have paint fumes around any of these unless you want to blow your house and garage into the neighbor's yard!

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post #3 of 32 (permalink) Old Dec 25th, 00, 10:26 AM
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i have an oil furnace in my and love it. but my father heats his shop w/ a gas furnace and its even better. i went for years w/the type heater you,re talking about and compared to the two i,ve just mentioned [oranges to apples]i always smelled those things and stayed sick alot.GET RID OF IT.even if you don,t smell it believe me its doing damage.i wouldn,t go back to one of them if someone bought me a brand new one and furnished all the fuel.
 
post #4 of 32 (permalink) Old Dec 25th, 00, 11:36 AM Thread Starter
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Since I want to avoid any fire hazard, does this mean having an external ( to the building ) heating unit if I want to paint, etc? I have a detached garage so it's not as simple as running ductwork.
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post #5 of 32 (permalink) Old Dec 25th, 00, 12:22 PM
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I really don't know what the ideal solution is. Even if your garage is attached to your house you can't run ductwork from your house furnace out there - the danger of sucking carbon monoxide and/or other fumes into the house is too great.

When I paint, I get everything ready while the heater is running (being very careful about mixing paints or using solvents). Then I let the heater run for a while until the garage and everything in it is pretty warm. I shut off the heater and spray and then leave it all shut up for a while until the paint sets up. Then I open up the garage and let the fumes dissipate before I fire the heater back up. This only works if your garage is insulated and it's not so cold that it instantly cools off. I've had pretty good luck this way but I don't even try if it's down in the low 20's or below.

One option may be to rent some booth time at your local paint and body shop. I have been able to do that occasionally - especially if the body guys are working Saturday but the painter is not.

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post #6 of 32 (permalink) Old Dec 25th, 00, 09:09 PM
 
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Just be careful of any heating system you try out in the garage. Here in Sacramento, a firefighter friend of mine went out on a call a while back where a few people died in their sleep using propane space heaters indoors. I know it's a little different situation, but taking caution with any kind of system using a fuel burning source in an enclosed environment is important. Also, I turn off my gas water heater whenever I paint inside my garage. Sometimes you forget about the pilot light and the paint fumes.
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post #7 of 32 (permalink) Old Dec 26th, 00, 01:00 AM
 
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I currently have a fuel oil heater and don't want to remember what it was like without it. Of course mine was made in the 40's. Are there any manufacturers that still make fuel oil heaters??
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post #8 of 32 (permalink) Old Dec 26th, 00, 02:46 AM Thread Starter
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It seems like I should put a clean burning system in ( to eliminate fumes from a health point of view ) and shut it off if I paint or clean with solvents that would have combustible fumes. A person I know has a propane fueled salamander type heater boxed into a small enclosure outside his garage with ductwork to the inside.
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post #9 of 32 (permalink) Old Dec 26th, 00, 04:50 AM
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When I built my new garage I installed a Reznor forced-air gas unit heater, suspended from the ceiling in the corner, ducted/vented directly outdoors through the wall. To avoid pilot flame problems, I specified the burner with electronic ignition so there is no ignition source unless the unit is actually cycling. It's controlled with a normal wall thermostat, but the main power switch is right over my workbench so I can deactivate it if I'm working with solvents. Works like gangbusters, no fumes, no CO; garage is super-insulated with finished interior walls, so it doesn't cycle very often anyway.

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post #10 of 32 (permalink) Old Dec 26th, 00, 08:40 AM
 
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The only cure-all is an infra-red tube heater with an exterior heat element and exhaust. There is no open flame, no exhaust in the garage and it's up and out of the way. You MUST use reflectors for heat direction and it too should be turned off while spraying because the tubes get hot.
This type heater heats objects and they in turn heat the air around them so all surfaces heat first and then the surfaces heat the surounding air so the first thing to warm up is your car. Any heating supply house will have information on them and they cost more than conventional heaters. They also are controlled by a regular house thermostat.
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post #11 of 32 (permalink) Old Dec 26th, 00, 11:36 AM
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An electrician friend of mine fixed me up with an electric garage heater. This thing is a 12" cube, and hangs above my workbench. It needs a 30 amp 220 line, and has a fan and thermostat. It does a great job, and cost less than $200 at an electrical supply house.



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post #12 of 32 (permalink) Old Dec 26th, 00, 11:46 AM
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I have a heating system that is what I feel as close to perfect as you can get. It is a 75000 btu Hot dog by Modine. The hot dog doesn't have a pilot like most units, it has a wire or something that will get cherry red before it lites the burners. It is a low profile that hangs close to the ceiling, it exhausts throught the side of the wall instead of the roof to prevent leaks and moisture from getting inside. It heats a 24x40 insulated building like it doesn't even run hard. There are ventless furness' out there, but they will require dehumidifiers, because they will really make things damp in the building.
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post #13 of 32 (permalink) Old Dec 26th, 00, 02:41 PM
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If you're real cheap like me, buy a $25 electric that plugs into the 120v wall outlet. Mine works great as long as you work while sitting on it. Just be careful not to catch your axx on fire. Gotta save that money for the big block. (kidding of course)
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post #14 of 32 (permalink) Old Dec 26th, 00, 04:45 PM
 
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oil heaters are just that oil. and the burn heat has a oil in it. you talking about "fisheye" get your heat in a room to itself and duct heat over to were you will be painting at. be carefull
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post #15 of 32 (permalink) Old Dec 26th, 00, 04:45 PM
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I have the Slimline Reznor with side vent which you can get to use in an area with fumes.It's an enclosed fire box or something.
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