traction bars and ride quality - Team Camaro Tech
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post #1 of 15 (permalink) Old Feb 28th, 00, 08:42 AM Thread Starter
 
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im looking to buy a set of traction bars for my monoleaf 67 but want to keep as smooth of a ride as possible.i dont really want the caltracs because of the aluminum bushings what kind of effect do the southside lift bars and the comp engineering bars have on the ride quality?
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post #2 of 15 (permalink) Old Feb 28th, 00, 08:44 AM Thread Starter
 
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also how does the hotchkis sway bar affect ride quality on a stock suspension?
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post #3 of 15 (permalink) Old Feb 28th, 00, 10:47 AM
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I don't know about the Hotchkis sway bar. The only time a traction bar will effect the ride quality is when front snubber is in contact with the leaf spring or spring eye. Otherwise it is only acting as the lower mount. The Competition Engineering are a good choice, they are long enough to contact the spring eye, most are not. This is important since it is not uncommon for the leaf springs to become permanently bent if the snubber makes contact on the leaf spring itself.

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post #4 of 15 (permalink) Old Mar 1st, 00, 06:48 PM
 
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<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by kentucky joe:
im looking to buy a set of traction bars for my monoleaf 67 but want to keep as smooth of a ride as possible.i dont really want the caltracs because of the aluminum bushings what kind of effect do the southside lift bars and the comp engineering bars have on the ride quality?<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

I have the southside traction bars on my 69 monoleaf. The front of the bars are rigidly attached to the leaf and the ride is pretty bad. I wouldnt recommend it. Eventually I'll convert to multileaf.
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post #5 of 15 (permalink) Old Mar 2nd, 00, 01:05 AM
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I have heard that you can modify the polyurethane bushings so that they can be used with the Cal-Trac bars. Many, many people love the Cal Trac bars. I have heard that they are the traction bar system on the market. Most of my friends though only run in straight lines and for short distances so I can't say their opinions would be the same if they drove their cars on the street everyday.
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post #6 of 15 (permalink) Old Mar 2nd, 00, 02:34 AM
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i have heard that traction bars esentialy make you rear leaf springs solid under hard turns wich makes your car s rear end want to overstear.

but i also heard that rear sway bars do the same thing, and came on the car factory.

i have seen alot of booth driving the streets with no problems. if you need traction go for it.
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post #7 of 15 (permalink) Old Mar 2nd, 00, 04:40 AM
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slapper style traction bars work by preventing the front half of the spring from wrapping up under accelleration. They must be adjusted to provide a reasonable air gap between the snubber and the spring eye, by trimming the snubber and angle shimming where they attach to the axle. If you can get a 1-1.5" air gap without the traction bar scraping the ground, they'll do a pretty good job without affecting ride quality too much.



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post #8 of 15 (permalink) Old Mar 2nd, 00, 09:21 AM
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The front bushing on the spring does not affect ride quality that much. Several people have told me that you can switch to a poly or aluminum front bushing to get better performance and keep the rear rubber bushings to get a good ride.

I also understand that Competition Engineering makes the best traction bars for 67-69 Camaros. Most companies make them for 67-81 and these are too short. I bought C.E. traction bars and have been happy with them. However, even with the appropriate street air gap (I use 1.5 inches), on large bumps the snubber will hit the spring and make a big BANG, like the sound when you bottom out the suspension.

I have also heard that they can negatively impact handling, but I think the proper air gap can solve this problem.

------------------
Hugger Orange & white 69 Camaro with supercharged 350, Tremec TKO, and 3.73 12-bolt
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post #9 of 15 (permalink) Old Mar 2nd, 00, 05:24 PM
 
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Make sure that the traction bars are long enough so the stubber hits the eye holes for the leaf spring, are else it can cause your leaf to bend.
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post #10 of 15 (permalink) Old Mar 2nd, 00, 06:33 PM
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If you use traction bars that bolt to the springs at their front end, they will try to twist the differential housing on every corner. This acts like a HUGE sway bar at the rear. This will cause major oversteer. Also I noticed my car rose straight up all around when I got on it. This is not what you want for off the line traction with street tires. You want the front to rise, and the rear to squat just a little for weight transfer. Also, on a 67 there are NO U bolts on the rear end. Some that have attached traction bars without adding u bolts have twisted off the spring pads from the housing. The caltrac type is what I like.
If you have drag type front shocks and a lot of tire, and don't care about cornering, the traction bars may work.
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post #11 of 15 (permalink) Old Mar 3rd, 00, 08:22 AM
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It has been my long understanding that the rear of the car should RISE SLIGHTLY if the rear suspension set up correctly.

When the rear drops, it does so because your set-up is pulling the rear axle up into the body and away from the ground. When this happens, weight is being removed from the tires.

When the body rises, it is because the rear axle is being pushed away from the body into the ground. Since the axle is being pushed toward the ground, the tires will have better traction.

Such a set-up is definately for the track. Street ride would be very harsh.

------------------
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post #12 of 15 (permalink) Old Mar 3rd, 00, 01:21 PM
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I too, have always understood that the rear end should rise. This is a sign that the car is transfering weight efficiently. A car that does this will not necessarily ride harshly, it all depends on the rest of the suspension. If the car has traction bars and there is an air gap the ride will be no different than a car without traction bars.

Steve R.
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post #13 of 15 (permalink) Old Mar 3rd, 00, 04:31 PM
 
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That's what I thought. When the rear goes up it is driving the tires into the ground creating intense traction possibilities, if the power is there the front will also rise. See this on the really quick cars. Mine won't do it. wish it would.
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post #14 of 15 (permalink) Old Mar 3rd, 00, 05:14 PM
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A car does not have to be fast to do this, I have seen plenty of 13 and 14 second cars do this. Head out to your local dragstrip, check out the cars that exibit this tendency then go talk to the owner. These people by the way will probably be able to give you some good tips if you wanted to learn to bracket race.

Steve R.
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post #15 of 15 (permalink) Old Mar 6th, 00, 11:23 AM
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Steve,

What I meant was that most people close up the air gap at the track. I've seen people run .5 inch or so depending on the car and tranny (auto vs manual). Therefore, for a dual purpose car, you would have a track setting and a street setting.

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Hugger Orange & white 69 Camaro with supercharged 350, Tremec TKO, and 3.73 12-bolt
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