Restoration Tips? Give 'em up! - Team Camaro Tech
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post #1 of 29 (permalink) Old Jan 9th, 01, 06:02 AM Thread Starter
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John
 
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: Orchard Park, NY USA
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Question

I'm not sure if this has been posted before, but since this site is absolutely incredible about sharing information, I thought it might be cool to list restoration tips. Here are 2 of mine to get this started.

Rustoleum Semi Gloss Black #7777; Yes this spray bomb is absolutley the best black I've used, it goes on thin and blends perfectly, so future touch-ups are a breeze. I wished I used it on my sub-frame, but did use it everywhere else (including my 67's interior black paint areas) Unless you're building a Diamond class car, I'd use it.

Plastikote Bumper Chrome; I actually cringed at the thought of buying this to touch up my tail lamp bezels (which I wound up buying new anyway) So I had this can laying around, and decided to use it on an "out of the way" part. Wow! It looks great on any small metal part that should have a nickel plate or bare metal look. Trust me, don't clear coat any small metal part that would normally rust, because it eventually will.

Lets hear some of yours?

John
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post #2 of 29 (permalink) Old Jan 9th, 01, 06:34 AM
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Doing restoration work?, invest in a sandblaster or if you can afford it- a glass bead blaster. If you do a lot of work around the house or yard you will pay for this machine 2 times over in a year.
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post #3 of 29 (permalink) Old Jan 9th, 01, 07:16 AM
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When doing an oil change, most of the time, ok all of the time, I spill when pouring the fresh oil into the valve cover hole. To clean things up, I have taken a clean empty quart oil container and cut the bottom off. When you make the cut imagine you are going around the container in a motion similiar to using a pipe cutter. Now put the bottomless container into the hole in the valve cover just like you're pouring oil in. Go ahead and fill 'er up. You now have a much larger target to hit and it's higher up off the valve cover so easier to get the oil in there without spilling. When you finish, screw the cap back on the empty and slide the empty container down on top of a quart you have in storage to keep the inside nice and clean.

[This message has been edited by denverRS/SS (edited 01-09-2001).]
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post #4 of 29 (permalink) Old Jan 9th, 01, 08:43 AM
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Got a set of nasty plug wires? (or any wiring for that matter) Take some waterless hand cleaner (GOOP) and wipe them down, then take a dry rag and wipe it off, if it is a stuborn stain just work it in a little longer. They come out looking like new. And it won't dry them out like Laquer thinner.

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TONY
67 CAMARO R/S CLONE, 355/turbo 350, 200hp NOS,12 bolt,etc...
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post #5 of 29 (permalink) Old Jan 9th, 01, 09:08 AM
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Rick
 
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(NOTE CHANGE to my original imput, it was copper paint not gold)An alternative to painting exhaust manifold with stainless paint or Cast Blast is to spray a heavy coat of COPPER NON high temp paint. Yes COPPER, the paint will burn off and leave a rainbow type natural metal finish that truly looks like virgin cast steel. We used to do it this way in the early '80's before cast paint was available. WARNING, start the engine and heat the exhause BEFORE your friends see it. It will last almost as long as cast paint. I strongly recommend buzz painting your daily driver with a quick coat and see if you like before doing to your resto.

[This message has been edited by Rick_Nelson (edited 01-10-2001).]

[This message has been edited by Rick_Nelson (edited 01-10-2001).]
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post #6 of 29 (permalink) Old Jan 10th, 01, 05:41 AM
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Brian Cooper
 
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Reverse twist drill bits. Dad had a set I used on all bolts with round heads (they come that way factory right?) and they pull any old bolt right out. I need a set for Angie's Vette.

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57 Plymouth Savoy in my family since new, jsut cosmetically restored, 93 S-10 waiting on the 305 out of Angie's 69 RS/SS, Angie's mechanic
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post #7 of 29 (permalink) Old Jan 10th, 01, 11:57 AM
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Need a good semi-gloss black? Go to your local Catipillar heavy equipment dealer and ask for their Medium Gloss Black Paint, it is great for firewals and frames, you can even flatten it to your liking with a flatting agent. The best, its less than 30 bucks a gallon

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69 rallye green X77 Z/28,1967 SS 396 Conv. 1974 c-10 454 swb
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post #8 of 29 (permalink) Old Jan 11th, 01, 06:51 AM
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Bruno
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
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Lightbulb

One thing I hate a lot is that dimmed look of the old cars tail lamps, I clean the inside of the assembly and put a metalic tape used in refrigeration work that shines like chrome and cover all the inside in order to have a good reflective area for the bulbs to reflect the light.Also I use a diamond compound that I purshase here that comes in a syringe and is great to polish the tail & side lenses of any color, they end up looking shinny like new again.With that same product I polished the lens on the gauge cluster (great results)and removed fade of the windshield glass and windows all around the car. It doesn't leaves scratches at all.Ah, Bug & Tar remover worked nice to remove dirt and stains from my 68's switch operators in the dash panel, it remove everything from the serrated lines around them and leave them bright again.Like some say, my 2 cents...
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post #9 of 29 (permalink) Old Jan 11th, 01, 06:59 PM
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Lightbulb

When trying to duplicate the factory gray or black phosphate finish on the hood hinge/spring and hood latch spray the parts flat black first. Then after that is dry paint over with a light coat of Cast Blast and this will closely match the factory coating but be much more durable. Also, when painting springs, use heavy weights (200 lbs)
attatched th the ends of the springs and suspended from and engine lift to extend the springs so all parts are painted.

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'69 SS 396/375hp L78 M21 3.73 Fathom green/medium green interior

http://albums.photopoint.com/j/ViewP...695&p=33013081
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post #10 of 29 (permalink) Old Jan 12th, 01, 07:59 PM
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UNDERCOATING REMOVAL-A clean underside is not only nice to look at but it makes working under your car alot more pleasant and easy. The best way to do this is with a propane torch and a paint scraper. Most of the thin dried up stuff will flake right off but the thicker areas, especially the wheel wells, should be heated up a small portion at a time. This both softens and loosens the undercoating making it MUCH easier to scrape off. After you scrape it off, clean the bottom of the car with tar remover to get all the residue off. Then simply paint the underside with a nice flat of semigloss black paint. PS-If you race your camaro, removing the undercoating saves a good 30-35 pounds. Thats good for about .035 of a second. Every little bit counts

[This message has been edited by jvolk81 (edited 01-12-2001).]
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post #11 of 29 (permalink) Old Jan 13th, 01, 08:57 AM
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When re-filling your cooling system (after draining it down to change an intake or water pump), fill it up to the top of the opening in the intake for the thermostat housing first, before installing the thermostat or housing or upper radiator hose; this will eliminate any air pockets that have to work their way out after the engine warms up and the thermostat opens. To do this without spilling coolant, get one of those short plastic funnels with the large diameter outlet that's made to fit into a radiator fill opening, drill a bunch of 1/4" holes around the outlet tube, and place it in the thermostat opening in the intake - the end of it will bottom out on the floor of the coolant passage and it will stand up straight. Now you have a funnel to aim at with your jug of coolant, the holes let the coolant flow into the passage, and you can see clearly when the coolant level starts to rise up near the top of the opening. When the coolant level gets near the top, stop pouring, install the thermostat, housing, and upper radiator hose, and finish filling through the radiator opening. When you start it up, you won't have any air pockets, and it will only need to be topped off.

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JohnZ
'69 Z28 Fathom Green
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post #12 of 29 (permalink) Old Jan 14th, 01, 01:04 AM
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Lightbulb

When taking things apart you may not put back together for a while or you just plain want to remeber how it goes back together, take pictures. If you have a digital camera all the better, if you have no camera at all you can buy one of the many availble with flash and film ready to shoot for about $6.00. Not only does this help you put things back together. It helps you document your work. Take some before and after shots. The most important thing is not to loose them when you move accross country like I did!!!! Most of mine are gone, put them in a safe place.
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post #13 of 29 (permalink) Old Jan 14th, 01, 08:58 AM
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I use Zip-Loc "Freezer Bags" by the dozens to organize and store parts when tearing down; they're nice and thick, come in many sizes, and have a "frosted" label area on them to write the part descriptions on (Sanford "Sharpie" pens are great - they write on ANYTHING). I punch a hole in the center of the top of the bag (above the sealing groove) and hang them on both sides of a 4'x8' sheet of pegboard with legs on it, organized by UPC Group (like the A.I.M. - 1 for body, 2 for frame, 3 for front suspension, 4 for rear suspension, etc.) - just like we used to do at Chevrolet Engineering when we built prototypes. Have done this for years, and have never lost a part (except the ones that fell off the back of the workbench ).

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JohnZ
'69 Z28 Fathom Green
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post #14 of 29 (permalink) Old Jan 15th, 01, 03:13 PM
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Rick
 
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An additional note to Bob Jenkin's replicating grey and black phosphating.....If you hold the spray can a little farther away and spray in small bursts, causing a dry spray, you can replicate the rough texture you get will real phosphating. Experiment first before spraying your part.
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post #15 of 29 (permalink) Old Jan 15th, 01, 05:20 PM
 
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Need to do interior work? Planning to vinyl paint things? I have found out that regular old rattle cans work on plastics as well as the expensive vinyl paint.

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One Fine '83
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