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That's what an engine builder told me today. I needed someone to drill steam holes and he started asking me questions about my combo. He said you don't want a tight quench, that >.045 would be better/safer on pump gas. I'm going to ignore his comment.
 

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And you're going to let him drill your steam holes??

My understanding is there are quite a few people running around without steam holes...and suffering no issues whatsoever. Maybe it depends on the engines setup.

I need to ask my father about that, he just built a 400 for 70 Chevelle, and I don't think he drilled steam holes.
 

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I think your engine guy is slightly confused :noway:
 

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.040 quench here and all good.
No holes here and no problems even hot lapping at the strip. I also keep it above 2500 rpm (10" 3000 stall helps that :rolleyes: )
 

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Please tell me about the steam holes.

Where are they drilled and where is the steam coming from and where does this steam go?

Just learning as I go.....
 

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He is mistaken for sure, that is the ideal range to help resist detonation.
Steam holes are NOT needed unless you plan on sitting at an idle for hours on end every day, thats the only reason chevy drilled them in the first place. I as well as everyone I know have no steam holes in our 400's, with zero problems. This will no doubt start a huge debate, so I'll leave it at that. Try searching "steam holes" and you'll see my opinion as well as others on them......trust me ;)
However if it makes you feel better, have somebody else drill them for you, I think I have lost faith in your machinist.....:D
 

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Mike,
On 400's the bores are siamesed, or connected at the side that joins the next cylinder in line. The 400 bore was larger and required this to fit in the smallblock package as it was. In cars that sat for hours idling etc., steam would build up at the point under the deck where the cylinders joined, creating steam pockets. They drilled holes at the two center cylinders from the block to the heads to complete the water jacket path when water was flowing at its slowest, i.e. idling. It was necessary to do because these motors went into vans, trucks and taxicabs, and the steam would build apparently at under 1800 rpm or so. In a car such as our Camaros the water flows well enough because they are driven, to never necessitate the holes. You always hear people say you need to drill them, but never an account of a time they personally didn't and had problems, it's just one of those things I guess....
Now I can tell you of incidences people decided to drill the holes and drilled them wrong........
 

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That's what an engine builder told me today. I needed someone to drill steam holes and he started asking me questions about my combo. He said you don't want a tight quench, that >.045 would be better/safer on pump gas. I'm going to ignore his comment.
RUN AWAY from this no-nothing "Engine Builder"
It appears he has garnered his "Knowledge" at the local diner over coffee,,or the "Dew Drop In" over brews.
 

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All I'm gonna say is that FORD thought enough of bleeding off any steam that might form between the siamese cylinders that they jig drilled parallel under the decks bleed holes between cylinders from the valley on their NEW hi-po 5.0 block that's supposed to be good for boo-coo hp so go from there!!!!!!!!!!!!

pdq67
 
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