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Your old Eaton Posi is stronger than the Yukon Dura Grip. I'd recondition it and keep it. If the parts in your Eaton are still good then there is no need to replace them. Many times all you need to do is shim the clutches to restore the preload.
 

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Why a rebuild? Jack up one wheel of rear axle, leave trans in neutral.
Apply torque wrench onto a lug nut and rotate the one tire with opposite tire on the ground.
You are testing the tightness of the clutches. Torque to 'break loose' the clutches is a minimum of 35 ft-lbs.
If the axle passes this test, just change oil and add GM clutch additive.
 

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Don’t over do the Posi additive. It can get too slippery and interfere with the clutch lock up.
 

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Just install heavier springs. Standard rate for the springs is 50 lbs/inch. GM sells, or used to, 75 lb springs.
I would like to say, yellow springs are standard and green are heavier rate.
 

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Why a rebuild? Jack up one wheel of rear axle, leave trans in neutral.
Apply torque wrench onto a lug nut and rotate the one tire with opposite tire on the ground.
You are testing the tightness of the clutches. Torque to 'break loose' the clutches is a minimum of 35 ft-lbs.
If the axle passes this test, just change oil and add GM clutch additive.
Everett, What a great tip. I might be tipping my knowledge (or lack of it) but I had never heard of that. I will go try it out on my newly installed used 12 bolt as soon as I can.
Thanks,

Brett......
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks Freddie, that what I was thinking that the Eaton unit was superior.

It always starts off as a simple project. had leaky axle seal, changed bearings and seals. Thrust washer fell out trying to install pin. Noticed pitting on the spider and side gears and what looks like debris marks on both sides of the thrust washers. Current plan is to pull the carrier and clean and inspect everything.

Just exploring options and best route once the inspection is completed.

Everett, thanks for the tip on using a torque wrench.
 

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I went with the Yukon set up and axles and it turns out that the axles have a larger inner stand-off than mosier, strange or stock replacements so I had to get my rotors machined. Then I had to get the caliper brackets machined since the axles stick out slightly further than the aforementioned brands. Not the end of the world but it was annoying.
 

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You're welcome, straight from the Chevrolet Service Manual
Why a rebuild? Jack up one wheel of rear axle, leave trans in neutral.
Apply torque wrench onto a lug nut and rotate the one tire with opposite tire on the ground.
You are testing the tightness of the clutches. Torque to 'break loose' the clutches is a minimum of 35 ft-lbs.
If the axle passes this test, just change oil and add GM clutch additive.
I never knew those specs existed!

Chevy68, be aware that a special tool is used in the service manual to attach the torque wrench in the center of the hub. You should be able get accurate readings if you orient the wrench at a tangent to the hub, (90 degrees from the centers of the hub and the stud.)

Just in case you weren't aware...
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I went with the Yukon set up and axles and it turns out that the axles have a larger inner stand-off than mosier, strange or stock replacements so I had to get my rotors machined. Then I had to get the caliper brackets machined since the axles stick out slightly further than the aforementioned brands. Not the end of the world but it was annoying.
Funny how these simple little project turn into big projects!!!:grin2:
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I never knew those specs existed!

Chevy68, be aware that a special tool is used in the service manual to attach the torque wrench in the center of the hub. You should be able get accurate readings if you orient the wrench at a tangent to the hub, (90 degrees from the centers of the hub and the stud.)

Just in case you aren't aware...
Thanks for the heads up. I do have a 3- hole puller I could use to center on he hub.
 
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