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Discussion Starter · #341 ·
With this last batch of parts, I'm hopefully very close to being at the end of my purchasing... I have sold a bunch of parts to offset these purchases as well as gotten some fantastic deals from people all over the internet. After mulling over what engine accessories to get, I opted to start searching for the stock LSA accessories. I found a guy who sold me the balancer, brand new water pump and a power steering pump for a smoking deal. Then the same guy who I bought the fuel rails from, also sold me the idler bracket. So with the exception of an alternator bracket, I have the complete engine accessories that will give me a true 3 belt setup for the supercharger to run on it's own belt. Much less of a chance for the belt to slip with this setup.













Now, back to the shortblock build. Not sure if it will help or not, but many people say that the Sacc City barbell upgrade is worth it and while I had it this far apart, I figured why not. Supposed to help with oil pressure and filtration.





Now before the final torque, I got a bunch of mixed feedback online about whether or not the factory rod bolts are re-usable. I opted to just replace them rather than chance it. I would have opted for ARP bolts, but they change the clamping load and would require that I machine them, and I didn't want to open another can of worms. People have made crazy 1000+ HP numbers on the factory rod bolts, so I'm sure I'll be fine. The factory rod bolts have a bushing that keeps them installed into the cap so they won't come out easily. I opted to finish a project I have been putting off. Adding a pair of vice grips to my slid hammer.



5/16-18 Tap for those who are interested.



I kept one side of the rod cap tight and then clamped on the other side. A quick little tap with the slide hammer and they popped right out.



Once I got the final approval from the boss, the shortblock was final assembled and torque'd to spec. A torque angle dial is required for that, which I have earlier in the build.





To be continued...
 

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Discussion Starter · #342 ·
The shortblock is now together and ready for the rest of the bolt ons. Please note that I assembled things out of order, so I had to pull the oil pump back off to get the chain damper installed. I'm going to post the pictures in the order that I took them, but wanted to make note for anyone assembling a motor that the chain, timing gear and damper need to go on before the oil pump.

This is the more fun part of the engine building process for me. Bolting on the parts as I unbox them. Much better than cleaning up used parts before they are installed. I thought I would share that I bought the Summit Racing oil pump and it turns out that they are re-boxing Melling pumps. M295





Next up was cleaning up the Holley 302-3 oil pan, windage tray, internal baffle and oil pickup. Now that the shortblock is assembled, I wanted to get it buttoned up to keep any debris out of it. Too much time spent cleaning to mess it up now.





Most of this had to be taken back off to get the damper on.



I was probably distracted since I was really looking forward to installing the cam! I went with the Summit Racing 8715 which is the stage 1 boost cam that is nicknamed the Ghost Cam. The specs are 222/233 115+3, .600/.575. I've heard really good things about this cam, and one of the things that sold me is that it has a negative overlap which will keep the boost inside the cylinders rather than bleeding off. I also didn't want to go crazy with a huge cam since this will be on a supercharged motor. Should have a nice idle too.



This is where I noticed that the damper wouldn't fit. I didn't care though, I had to toss my heads on to see what the long block looked like. Very happy I'm at this point, but the appearance of the block leaves a lot to be desired.





Next morning I pulled the pump and pickup back off and installed the chain damper with some blue Loctite. Repeated the process with the cam plate and cam sprocket. All back together now.





But that block was really bugging me. I had power washed it several times and hit it with Purple Power a bunch and it wasn't cleaning up like I hoped. So it was time to get out the soap and water and scrub it down for paint. I had my little helper buddy out there scrubbing on the block too which was really cool. Didn't get a picture though...



Since it was so cold out, I had to make a little spray booth in the garage to minimize the overspray. It worked really well in conjunction with cracking the garage door and opening a window. It sorta worked like a downdraft booth since the cold air came in through the window and out the garage door.



I read up on this a bunch and decided to try some Self Etching primer as a base rather than the VHT primer. Aluminum is different than steel and needs a better base to really stick. So I figured I'd give this a try.



Finally the color coats. I went with the tried and true Chevy Orange. I really liked it when I put my first motor in the car with the 5.3, and wanted to do it again. Very happy with the results and hopefully with the etching primer it has a really durable finish. I also have my boiler room attached to my garage which is a very tiny room that I use for storing car parts, but when the door is closed will get very hot, probably in the 130-140 range and thought this would be perfect to let the motor dry in overnight. Hopefully it helps with the curing process.

So much better than the corroded aluminum look!!





Timing cover wasn't ready for paint and sorta takes away from it, but it looks really good with the aluminum heads. I'm keeping this look, but all of my accessories will be painted satin black. I think it will give a nice throwback look.





That's where I'm at now, and very happy to have gotten the block assembled during the winter break from work. Now I can slowly clean up parts and hopefully get the motor installed back in the car soon.

Cheers,
Ryan
 

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Love the progress. Amazing how something can snowball. Great work as always!
 

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What? A project Camaro snow ball? LOL.... I am right there with you brother. I have finally realized when I am trying to forecast a budget just add another zero to be accurate.
 

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Discussion Starter · #348 ·
You guys are both spot on. If I want to finish this for the spring, I need to make some decisions on what can wait and what needs to be done now. No more looking at the classifies for me.

I'm continuing the engine build by getting my heads ready for install. I had originally planned on doing a light port work and bowl cleanup on the heads, but realized that with boost, I think it's really less important than before when I was planning an N/A build. Plus I kinda chickened out haha. The heads are low mileage LS3 0821 heads, and the plan is to clean them up and reinstall. First up is to clean up all of the carbon build up off of the intake valves. It was pretty caked on there. I was actually surprised based on the overall condition of the heads. I didn't think there would be as much build up as there was.







Here's a few before and after. Pretty gummed up. Really glad that I pulled the valves and didn't just swap over the springs.





By no means is it perfect, but did a few rounds of Purple Power and it cleaned about 90% of the gunk out of the runners. I know that it will not stay clean inside so I didn't spend too much time there. Really mostly concerned with the outside cleanup. Overall they heads are in excellent condition.





Once the accessories are installed no one will see this, but I like the detail work.



I was doing some research and settled on the heat exchanger circulation pump. Being the budget conscious person I am, I was trying to find an alternative to the the Varimax pump that seems to be the go to pump for most LSA swaps. What I found is a comparison of a bunch of pumps and found that the Pierburg CWA50 pump that is found on several OEM cars (mine came from an X5 BMW 4.4 Turbo) and performs as good as the Varimax pump, but I picked mine up for $60 rather than $450. Plus mine came with a mounting bracket and a harness. I was also shocked by the size of it. It's roughly the height of a beer can, and maybe twice the diameter. It's also supposed to be nearly silent, which is a win.





Next up is disassembling the rockers and getting them cleaned up for install. I bit the bullet and bought the CHE bronze Trunnion upgrade. They are supposed to be the best upgrade for the stock rockers other than going to a full on shaft rocker. What really sold me is that they don't require the bronze to be pressed in, but rather a free floating design that allows for the bushing to float and have oiling grooves for a smoother movement. Hope to have my rockers all disassembled and clean for when the show up. Then I can measure for my pushrods and button up the motor. :lol:

I'm really looking forward to tearing into the TR6060 to swap to the Magnum tailshaft. Should be interesting as it's something I've never done before.

Cheers,
Ryan
 

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Discussion Starter · #349 ·
Well at the moment, I'm waiting on a valve spring compressor to continue on with my engine build so I've decided to take another step forward, but in a different direction. I've been doing a lot of reading and finally feel that it's time to attempt the transmission. I'm starting with a low mileage LS3 TR6060 out of a 2010 Camaro. After searching online, reading other write-ups, calling sponsors and talking to friends who have build transmissions, I'm ready to attempt the T56 Magnum Tailshaft conversion. At a high level this involves disassembling the transmission down enough to remove the mainshaft, remove everything from the 5th gen mainshaft, swap it all back onto the T56 Magnum mainshaft, then reinstall using the new T56 Magnum extension housing. I took about 100 different photos on just the disassembly, but I'll just post a few to give you an idea what all is involved.

Here's what I started with:



Removed the tailshaft housing first. Then I test fit the new housing to get a ballpark of where the shifter will land.





Every bit of information I could find online about the T56 Magnum shows that the rear shifter location is 26.6" from the bellhousing and the Magnum-F is 29.4". My car was set up for a 4th Gen T56 which is set up to be a drop in for the Magnum-F, so I had originally assumed that I would need to use one of the Sikky setback shifters. Now what is very interesting to me is that the TR6060 with magnum Tail shaft housing measures out to 28" on the dot, with an overall length of roughly 35.25". That means that with the stock Magnum shifter that I should be only about 1.4" forward of my old shifter location. Maybe someone who builds these transmissions can chime in, but I'm assuming that this has something to do with the larger bellhousing for dual friction clutches and the built in cooler pump.



Now the real disassembly starts. I made sure to clean off my bench really well and took the advice of those that have done this before and laid everything out in a line as I remove it.





Now, I didn't have the special long jaw puller tool that is necessary for this job, but I got creative and build some extensions to my 8" jaw puller. Worked like a champ.





More to come...
 

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Discussion Starter · #350 ·
Thanks guys, it may look easy but is far from it. I'm learning as I go, just doing a lot of reading and trying to ask questions. Not sure if I can mention the name here since I don't believe they are a sponsor, but a particular company I've called for tech support has been very helpful whenever I've called them.

The tolerances do need to be checked, but from what I understand most parts are guided by the snap rings and they can only really go in a certain spot. I believe the biggest one I need to check is the overall mainshaft end play when I get the case bolted back together.

Once I pulled a blocker ring and a gear off the countershaft, the rest of the gears slid right off. I made sure to keep track of everything and take a bunch of pictures with every piece I removed. Here is right before the maincase was removed.



After all the detents and guide pins were removed I could pull off the main case.





Now I had access to the mainshaft to further disassemble.





I ended up buying a bearing puller kit from Harbor Freight and while it did the job, wasn't overly impressed with the quality. The chromed bearing separators themselves were nice quality, but the rest of the kit left a lot to be desired. The three jaw puller probably would have worked, but there wasn't much to grab onto with this smaller gear. I didn't want to risk chipping one of the teeth.



I took my time and slowly removed and documented everything. Then It came down to removing the front main bearing. I tried the smaller bearing separator, and ended up bending the cage. That lead to the rollers falling out. This was the only thing that was damaged during the disassembly process and I'm thrilled because that little bearing is only $20.





Here is the table with everything disassembled and in the order it was removed.



The Camaro TR6060 mainshaft is on top, and the new T56 Magnum shaft is on the bottom. You can see on the end of the Camaro shaft where the splines are and how it tapers down quite a bit. That is where guys break the transmissions when they put down more power than stock.





The trans at this point is completely disassembled and I wanted to take assessment of what parts I may need to order. All of the syncros look great with minimal wear as to be expected with a low mileage transmission. All the gears have nicely pointed teeth with no damage as well as the blocker rings and syncro assemblies. I then started looking at the tailshaft and realized there is one bearing and one bearing race installed. I was able to remove the top bearing race pretty easily, but the lower rear counter shaft bearing didn't budge. So I decided to replace it since it was also pretty inexpensive.

Out with the old:



In with the new:





It felt good to start reinstalling some parts, but that is as far as I want to go at this point until I get the new front mainshaft bearing. I want to have that installed so that I can test fit each gear as I go to ensure that I have the proper alignment. I ended up ordering the front main shaft bearing, rear countershaft bearing and a Tick speed bleeder. I'm hoping that it shows up sometime Saturday so that I can get the transmission back together soon.

I received what will hopefully be the one of the last engine parts before I can get it all back together. I splurged a little since it was my birthday a few weeks ago and went with the CHE Trunnion kit. Very impressed with the full floating design as well as the overall presentation. I can't think of any other part that I've opened where I was this impressed.



I'm not sure if I really "needed" the trunnion upgrade, but the motor had almost 200k on it, so I figured it was a good insurance policy. I also received a cheapy valve spring compressor that I bought from Amazon so now I have everything I need to measure for pushrods.

Cheers,
Ryan
 

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Discussion Starter · #351 ·
Thanks man. I'm learning a lot about how transmissions work!

I'm at a stand still with the transmission at the moment waiting for the front mainshaft bearing and rear countershaft bearing, so I started turning my attention to the engine again. After the first spring compressor I bought on Amazon turned out to be a scam, I ordered a second one from a different vendor which showed up this time. My first reaction was, "Wow this is bad it's not even close to lining up!" It took me a few minutes, but then I realized that they installed the bolt going the wrong direction. After I got that swapped around it did a great job with my PAC dual springs.







Another project I was working on was finalizing the jig in order to drill my head for the LSA dowel pin. I didn't like the idea of breaking off the dowel pin like most do, so I opted to figure out a way to drill it myself. Several months ago for a Lingenfelter jig, but they are unavailable. Someone responded to my ad on an LSA Facebook group and said he could build a jig. His was based on a template off of a gasket, so it needed some fine tuning, but once I got it centered, it fit perfectly. I had an old truck LS head that I used to get the centering just right, then did the final drill on my 821's. Came out perfectly.

Took several attempts to get it centered.



Once I was happy, I fully welded them together.



Here's the final fitment with the truck head.





Then onto my 821's.





Much better!!





My bearing showed up last night from Tick, so I'm hoping to get the transmission back together by the weekend to start mocking up for my driveshaft.

Cheers,
Ryan
 

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Discussion Starter · #352 ·
I've been slowly making progress with this transmission rebuild. I've had a few hang up's that I'll get into into later. I've also had a few parts that I bought a while ago slowly trickle in. Other than a driveshaft and a few other small parts I'm pretty sure that I have everything I need to get this motor back in the car.

Unlike with my LS1 accessories, there wasn't an easy OEM hose that I could find to use with the CTSV power steering pump. I found a fitting from TurnOne that would optimize the pressure and flow for the CTSV pump to my JGC steering box as well as convert over to -6AN lines. I then got Russel fittings and hose to make my own line.





What's nice is that they extended the fitting so that it sits outside of the pulley. That way you can easily tighten it.





Also got a bunch of fittings, hardware, brackets and some wiring from ICT. Low mount Corvette spaced alternator bracket to finish my swap.



LS3 starter since the TR6060 requires a small snout starter. Low mileage takeoff that I found on eBay from a dismantler.



The CWA50 pump that I bought from a 4.4 BMW had one of those quick connect fittings on it for the inlet, and I couldn't find any good info out there on it. I took a chance on a fitting I found on RockAuto and it was an exact fit. It is a heater hose from a VW.





I also bought a bunch of misc. parts from RockAuto when I made the order.



Bearings from Tick along with their Speed Bleeder. Also the AFCO hose in the picture with the TurnOne fitting is my clutch line.



I had a leak in my rear pinion, so I decided that since I was upgrading the whole drivetrain, I might as well swap out the stock 1310 12 bolt yoke for a forged 1350 unit from Inland Empire. I needed to get a new 31 spline slip yoke for the Magnum, so I opted for the Sonnax forged 1350 unit. Both are really nice pieces and will be needed to measure for a driveshaft when the time comes.



And last up for the parts update. I found a guy selling all of these parts, super low mileage BTR push rods, 100mm DSX idler (gives better belt wrap) and a few various belts. I got all of these parts for less than a new set of brand new pushrods. I still need to measure for length, but given that everything I'm using is stock, I'm confident that they will be 7.400 length.





To be continued...
 

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Discussion Starter · #353 ·
Once I received the #11 bearing from Tick, I was able to get it pressed on and started the reassembly process. It went pretty smoothly during the install, until I got to the part where I needed to press back on 5th and 6th gears.

Here's where I started back with my assembly. I made sure to inspect and carefully reinstall all of the syncros into the blocker ring assembly. It is also important to lubricate the parts with trans fluid as you install. Don't forget about the bearings too.





Moving on and almost ready to test fit the main case. Up to this point everything slid together and retained with large clips. Next up was to re-install the main bearing, 6th and 5th gear. It's also worth noting that I did need to disassemble part of it at this point because the shift rail for 3/4 needed to be installed still.



Here is what I came up with to install the bearing and gears. I found it online somewhere and it worked well for the first bearing, but I later found out that because the assembly was not 100% square, it was causing me to strip threads on the rod that I bought. I think also in part, it was the composition of the rod that I bought. I didn't realize it at the time, but the rod was a low strength carbon steel rod. I should have opted for a high strength 10.9 or 12.9 unit from McMaster Carr, or others. And for anyone that may be attempting this, the thread size for the T56 Magnum shaft (as well as most Tremec transmissions including standard T56) is M12 x 1.75.



After struggling for several days, I was able to get the 6th gear pressed on so that I could get the main case bolted together. I also made sure to put liquid Teflon around the guide pins, shift detents, and reverse light.







After a bunch of cussing and thoughts about it, I decided to try another way. I removed the 2" cap that I had drilled and in its place I used a 1/2" steel plate that I had with a small hole in it. I also put the pipe piece I had directly on the gear and against the flat steel. This gave me a much straighter pull and it almost effortlessly allowed me to press the gear on. I regret not taking a step back to re-evaluate how I was doing it. Would have saved a lot of aggravation.



Once that gear was back in it's home, the rest of the parts slid right into place.



Here is the final trans back together. I'd be lying if I didn't row through the gears for at least 10 minutes. I still need to get or make a plate for the mid-shifter location, but otherwise it's ready for install. Those 2x4 pieces that I have are for to space the bellhousing off the floor/workbench so that the input shaft doesn't have pressure on it.





I also received my LS3 valley cover which will make for a much cleaner PCV install. I found a good deal on a new crate motor take off on eBay that came with bolts and a new gasket.



Next up is to get everything on the motor bolted together so that I can get the longblock ready for install. I'm planning on installing the motor/trans bolted together as one unit and hopefully only one time. Since I'm really replacing an LS motor for an LS motor and Tremec transmissions that have very similar external dimensions, I'm hoping for no surprises. The biggest question mark for me is going to be the shifter location. If my measurements are correct, it should only be 1.5" farther ahead than my old Fbody T56.

I'm getting so excited to get the motor back together and hear it run.

Cheers,
Ryan
 

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Discussion Starter · #354 ·
Doesn't visually look like I've gotten much accomplished, but the short block has been completely buttoned up. I only had the timing and rear covers on to keep dust and dirt out.

I started out back and got the rear cover aligned with the pan and torqued down. Followed that up with the correct "big bearing" to properly match the TR6060 input shaft.



Next up was the front cover. I still needed to align the oil pump before I could get it final torqued. I used the .002 shims and it centered up very nicely. I oiled everything up with assembly lube, torqued and then installed the timing cover loosely.





Now I'm really starting to get excited about this project. I'm on the downhill side and starting to bolt on new (or new to me) parts. I grabbed my stock LSA balancer and installed it on the crank. I made sure to lubricate the hub so that it didn't tear the new seal. I have a crank pinning kit on the way and once that is here I'll add a few pins to make sure that the crank doesn't spin.



I'm sure there are other ways to accomplish this, but I used the transmission to help align my oil pan. I cleaned up the sealing surface and put a dab of silicone on the 4 corners where the front and rear covers meet the oil pan gasket. I snugged the oil pan to transmission and then torqued the pan.



While the transmission was attached, I test fit my starter. I had to get another starter because the TR6060 uses the smaller size.



Reinstalled my Holley mounts and now it's ready for the heads and valvetrain.





My 18MO shop buddy helped me put all of the bellhousing bolts where he felt they needed to be haha. Love having him help me in the garage.



Then moved onto the heads. I got all of the valve springs installed in the heads and they are ready to go. I put assembly lube on any moving part and now they are ready to install.



Once the heads are on I'll check my push rod length and button up the top end.

Cheers,
Ryan
 

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Discussion Starter · #355 ·
Made some more progress on my engine last week. I installed the LS7 lifters that have been soaking in new oil along with some trays.



Then I cleaned up the deck and head mating surfaces and installed a new LS9 head gasket.





Finished the head install with a set of ARP bolts torqued to their specs.





It was getting late when I was in the garage and got carried away test fitting the engine accessories. I started by test fitting the water pump, and before I knew it the whole accessories were mocked up.



I test fit a new LS1 Fbody belt that I had kept in the event that it would work with my new accessories, but it's way too short. The routing looks good, but I do need to find a smaller idler pulley. This one was a random one that I had just to mock up.



Then I got to looking at the low mount with truck alternator. It's going to be really close, and the positive stud will be contacting the frame. So I'm either going to need to reclock it or try a new alternator.







I finally tracked down the last part that I needed for my Hybrid TR6060-Magnum project. I needed a mid-shift plate to cover up where the stock TR6060 shifter was. I found one listed on eBay along with a shifter and messaged the guy. He sold me the plate by itself, Win. I'll get some new bolts, but here it is installed hand tight to keep out dust/dirt.



I also bought a few other parts. One is a trap door for the trunk so that I can swap out fuel pumps much easier. I like how this trap door is very slim and won't intrude into the truck far.



I also finally found a fitting that works for the fluid pump on the TR6060. It is Dorman Part# 800-732, with a 9/16-18 thread with O-ring on the transmission side and a 5/8-18 inverted flare fitting for the line. I opted to go with a conventional flare nut over an AN fitting because I think it will do a better job of cooling, and a little easier on the wallet.





I also got a 5' section of 3/8" NiCopp line with fittings and a Holley CAN splitter.



Thanks,
Ryan
 

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Discussion Starter · #356 ·
I've been continuing to make progress toward getting this motor installed. I have been jumping around, but I wanted to make sure that I've got everything test fit and ready so I only have to install the motor and trans once.

I started by mocking up the motor and engine harness. Holley gives a lot of extra wiring length, so I'm working on cleaning that all up. I'll wrap it up inside of the cabin, but outside it fits much tighter and cleaner. I also need to add a few wires for the Flex Fuel Sensor and MAC valve. Another little detail is that I had to re-drill the coil brackets to lower them by about 1" so that they clear the fuel rails. I have some really nice mesh wire wrap that I'll finish it all up in. Should look very clean and tidy when I'm done.





I mentioned that I'll be wiring up a MAC Valve, and what I'm going to try and do is use it as a makeshift boost control valve. There are a few people online who have been playing with the Terminator software to use this valve to control boost in certain situations. My intentions would be to turn down the boost while I break in the motor, but it could be used for traction control, valet mode, and etc. Something for me to play with down the road.



I also picked up a cheap LS1 Fbody alternator to try in the low mount position and it wasn't any better than the truck, so I'm back to square one.





I bought these a long time ago, and was looking forward to installing them ever since. With all of the miles on the stock rockers and the added lift from the cam, I opted to go with brass trunnions. I went with the CHE Trunnions for two reasons. I really liked how these had a floating design rather than a pressed in fixed bushing, and secondly by default of their construction the ease of installation. Because they are a floating design it doesn't require any press to install. They all just slip together. Overall it took me about an hour to assemble and lube them all up. Very impressed with the quality here and would recommend them highly.





After I installed the rockers, I measured for pushrods and came up between a 7.375 and 7.400, so I opted to use the 7.400 that I already have. If they end up being too tight and give that sewing machine sound, I'll swap them out for the looser of the two. What was interesting is that when I went to rotate the motor to check for pushrod length on a few different rockers, the motor was frozen. It didn't want to move at all. Now, I have doublechecked everything along the way so I was terrified I screwed something up. I assumed the worst, but it didn't make sense as nothing has changed that I could think of. So ended up pulling apart the front of the engine and found the culprit... oil pump. When I had disassembled to shim, I must have flipped the drive around and it clamped tight. I swore I was careful about orientation, but somehow got flipped 180*. After I corrected that, everything turned freely. While I was in there, I took the opportunity to document my timing marks as I didn't get a picture before. Re-torqued and reinstalled everything.



I then moved onto the clutch master cylinder swap. Last season I wasn't happy with how stiff the pedal was on my car. After researching I found out that Tick uses a 7/8" bore Tilton which by nature is more stiff, because the 3/4" is what came stock. So because I'm going to run a McCleod RXT which will be stiffer than the LS7, I opted to swap those out now. Nice thing about having the parts already fit, is it was a simple remove and reinstall exercise.



I got a crank pinning kit from LSXInnovations and the first one was "lost" in the mail, so they sent me another one. Well the replacement came one day and the "lost" one showed up the next day. I've contacted them to return one, so I'll see what they say.



I cleaned up the low mileage clutch (500 miles) that I bought a while ago and followed the installation instructions per their specs. All went very smoothly. The steel install tool worked so much better than the plastic ones. The trans slid right together.





Then I bent up and installed the fluid pump lines. Unfortunately the driver's side wouldn't fit the tunnel, so I need to make some changes to how it's routed. I'll end up using the stock line that came with the trans and a compression fitting so it will be a quick fix. But I was a little bummed since I liked how clean it was. Oh well.





Then after about an hour of messing around to carefully not hit anything, the motor/trans are installed! Overall the fitment is very similar since the drivetrain that it replaced was almost identical. I was worried that the slightly larger TR6060 bellhousing would be an issue, but it fit with room to spare. That's a huge relief. Another huge relief is that the stock Tremec shifter fits right in almost the same spot as my T56 Fbody trans. Overall a huge win!!





I'm hoping that the rest goes pretty smoothly since I'll be bolting on many pieces that were already fit to the car like the exhaust. I think I can make a slight modification to a truck alternator and it will work, but I need to get one in my hands. Another detail that I decided to do while I'm upgrading everything else was to upgrade from Terminator X to X Max for DBW. I was looking around at my throttle body options and considering a Nick Williams but they are $400 bucks. After looking around I was able to upgrade to Terminator X Max (Thanks MCB), sell my Terminator X base (Thanks Jonathan) and buy a pedal/throttlebody for about the same price. Should give me more control over when safeties can be activated and a few other options. So I'll need to make a few changes to accommodate that, but will be worth it in the end.

Thanks,
Ryan
 

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Discussion Starter · #357 ·
Luke, you did a great job on that LS swap. I think it may be time to start thinking about the 67 RS now:drive:

I made some more progress over the weekend. I decided to change gears and start thinking about my fuel system. I got the tank installed and mocked up so that I could cut an access hole in the trunk. I cringed a little before I made the cut, but it was worth it to be able to pop the fuel pump in and out so easily.





I need to get the hammer and dolly out to flatten out some of the panels. I'll also likely need to stitch weld some of the seams to make a flat spot to mount the access door. My pan is to make it look like semi-factory when it's done.



Mocked up and cut my power steering lines. The fittings and line are Russell Power Flex and were super easy to make. Made for a nice clean routing.



Then I turned my attention to my fuel tank. I bought the fuel sender from Rick's, but it ended up being pushed out several times on backorder, so I decided to make my own. I had a few leftover parts from another attempt I had at making a fuel sender in my last tank and built my own. I had a spare fuel sender that came with another fuel pump housing that I cannibalized the mounting point from. It worked out really well and works great.







The finished product installed in the tank. It's ugly, but works flawlessly.





I also made the change recently and decided to go with a Terminator X Max for the DBW function. I found a good buddy who wanted my Terminator X ECU and he bought that. Win win for both of us. I bought a gold blade LS3 throttlebody and a C6 pedal, just waiting for the new ECU to come in before I can test to make sure that they all work properly together.



I went back and forth on the few options that I have for running a low mount alternator in f-body location, but at the Vette spacing to line up with my CTS-V accessories. The stock truck 105 Amp alternator that I have would work other than the battery stud points right at the frame. After a failed attempt at trying to reclock the alternator, I thought maybe I could bend the stud to fit and get a new alternator. While this worked, it was not ideal. I found out that the Powermaster 484831 alternator has a side post stud, same small case CS130 and would be located roughly in the same spot that my bent stud was and it is a 165 Amp unit. But after mulling it over for a few days I decided against that because I'm just not a big fan of where the stud comes out.



That led me to think outside of the box. I found out that the 14+ Silverado/Sierra alternators are all a side post models, directly bolt into the location I need, are roughly the same size if not a bit smaller and come in 150 or 170 Amp models. Only downside is that they are controlled by PWM+ and will not function properly without the proper signal. I found a cheap 170 Amp unit on eBay this morning and will give this a try. Plus I should be able to program an output in X Max to drive the alternator and can use it to ramp up based on load. Keeping my fingers crossed that it fits because this would solve all of my alternator issues.

Cheers,
Ryan
 

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Discussion Starter · #358 ·
The warmer weather has come early this year and I'm now chomping at the bit to get the motor back together. The 14+ Alternator came in pretty quickly and I couldn't wait to test fit it, but unfortunately the dimensions that I found online weren't accurate and it is just a little too big for the low mount position. I was able to get it installed, but it meant shimming the bracket .100" away from the block and would need to lower the sway bar mount just to get it fit. Dealbreaker, but I'll save this alternator for another project. I had some parts sell unexpectedly so I bought the Powermaster alternator this morning that has the CS130D case which I know fits, is 165 Amps, and has a side post. Here's a picture of just how close the 14+ alternator was.



Moving on I had to remove the snout of the supercharger in order to replace the stock spring isolator with the revised solid isolator from Eaton. Found a little wear from the spring on the shaft, but luckily there isn't anything that rides on that part of the shaft so it won't affect anything. PSA to all LSA owners, Replace your spring isolators.





While that was off I also wanted to swap out the stock 2.95" pulley for the Griptech 2.50" pulley and ZPE hub. Wow that stock pulley was a PITA to remove. I ended up breaking the Harbor Freight 3 Jaw puller, but was successful with my bearing puller and impact gun.







My father in law let me stop over and borrow his shop press and we were able to get the new hub pressed on.







Then after test fitting the LS3 Throttlebody, I realized that on the driver's side of the opening, there was a spot that rose up slightly and after looking at other ported snouts, they smoothed this out to give a straighter shot into the intake. My buddy let me borrow his porting tools and I got to work. Here is the before doing my best to show the restriction. The right side of the picture is what I'm talking about.





Here is where I roughed it in being very careful to keep a light touch and long sweeping cuts.





Then I used some sanding drums that I had starting with 80 grit and finished with 100 grit. I definitely thing it's an improvement, but I'm sure it was minimal if any improvement. I washed it out multiple times to get all the grit out.







 

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Discussion Starter · #359 ·
Changing directions I also was able to get my trans crossmember modified since the TR6060 Hybrid was a little longer. Ended up needing to move it back about 1.25", but was at the same height.





I was using my dad's welder since he has a 211 Miller, whereas mine is a smaller 135. Glad I did because it gave excellent penetration. I didn't get the hang of his welder until the other side where I got all the settings perfect. Welds were a little hot at first, so I had to keep dialing it back. I could definitely get used to that welder for sure.





I also mocked up my engine accessories to make sure there wasn't any clearance issues anywhere. Luckily it all fit just fine, but wanted to be sure.



Now that the crossmember is finished, I'll be able to bolt up the trans for good and get my measurements for the driveshaft. One last thing though before I can do that is swapping out the differential yoke. I have a pretty bad leak there so I figured while I was addressing that I might as well upgrade to a 1350 yoke to match the trans and driveshaft I'll order. I bought this cool tool that will hold the yoke which will come in handy when I torque the new yoke down.



I'm hoping to swap the yoke this week and get some measurements for the driveshaft sent out so that can be made. There is a lead time so I want that to be in process while I work on everything else. I need to button up the fuel pump door in the trunk next, and start bolting parts back onto the car. Also hoping to get the supercharger back together soon and test fitting it soon.

Thanks,
Ryan
 

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Discussion Starter · #360 ·
I've been keeping busy and making a little bit of progress here and there. I got out into the garage last night and had something to show for it. This is partially an upgrade and partially maintenance. I've had a pinion leak since I build the rear end, but am now addressing that. Apparently you are supposed to add some sealant to the splines on the yoke, not just the nut. Lesson learned. Anyway, it was a great excuse to upgrade to a 1350 yoke while I had to pull the old yoke anyway. Hopefully I can get this back together soon, but I'm waiting on the correct pinion seal.



I should have just gotten the Powermaster 484831 from the beginning since I was sure that it would fit my needs. Failed attempt at using the 14+ Silverado alternator, but at least I tried right?? Anyway, this Powermaster unit checks all the boxes; 165 Amp, side post, and compact enough to fit where I needed it.









Again, I'm a sucker for a good deal. Picked up these Holley Tall Valve covers for half of retail that are brand new. They really serve two purposes for me; one I don't have to clean up my old scrubby ones, and two it moves the coils down so it doesn't interfere with the LSA fuel rails. And I'll add a third, they really look great. I'm either painting them Chevy orange or Torch Red to match the car. Haven't decided.



I also picked up a used Elite Engineering E2 Catch can with all the hoses and one way valve. Looks new, and helps with forced induction from what I understand. I'm going to build a mount off of the supercharger tensioner to keep it out of the way and easy to access. Unfortunately the head mount bracket won't work.





Then the moment that I've been waiting for for a very long time. It's only mocked up at this point to check for interference, but it really changes the look of the engine bay.







My cowl hood bumps up in the middle so this should clear no problem.





This picture is straight across the two fender top body lines.



I'm so pumped about hearing this thing run! Ordered a few more parts and thankfully there is only one more large purchase and a few smaller ones before I can call it done.

Cheers,
Ryan
 
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