Team Camaro Tech banner
421 - 440 of 442 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
719 Posts
Discussion Starter · #423 ·
Continuing on the assembly of my rear differential, I installed and torqued down my ARP Wheel studs to match the front. I've never used a screw in stud before, but according to Yukon I added some high strength thread locker and torqued to 90 lb ft. I actually used 95 lbs just because. Before that I also cleaned up the mating surfaces since they were raw uncoated. I just found some gray paint that I had left over.





Once they were installed, I put the C Clips in and the puck that comes with the TrueTrac. I really like that little puck instead of the pin in the Eaton copy because there is hardly any endplay in the axles now. I also like how the puck is retained in the carrier with the clip. Very nice design overall.





Another little adjustment that I needed to make was how I mounted the brake lines. Where they were on the top of the axle housing rubbed on the exhaust tail pipes, which I didn't realize until I was taking out the differential. So I cut them off and rotated down where the stock lines would have been. I didn't get a picture, but because of the relocation, I had to bend up some new lines to meet up. Both ended up a little short so I used some extra line I had.







Once the new lines were finished, back in the car she goes. Just needs to be filled with oil and that's a done deal.



Good news is that the Rocket wheels fit the rear! So they will work for rears if someone is interested.



Now that the rear is back together, it's time to start on the frame connectors! Out goes the interior. I'll need to modify the rear seat frames anyway for the mini-tubs so I needed the back seats out anyway.





First up before I did any cutting was to make sure that the frame was square. Now I thought it was good to go, but I never had a tape measure on it. Glad I did because I was out of square by about 3/16". Also the frame measured 1/2" more forward on the passenger side from the same reference point on the rear frame. I basically loosened up 3 body bolts and the 2 core support bolts. I left the short side rear frame bolt tight, then pulled on the passenger side wheel with some jackstands under the body and the weight taken off the frame. Worked great. I had to do that twice to get it to move enough, but after that I was 1/16" out of square, and the frame was only 1/16" forward now. Close enough for me.



Cut out my templates and laid them out roughly where they will go.





So because I had to take out the battery and battery tray to get to the core support bolts I figured I'd also install my new coolant overflow tank. It's from a 75-79 Chevy Nova and fits really nicely in the passenger fender space that is unoccupied.





It has a nice single mounting tab that meets up nicely with the ridge on the passenger fender too.





Almost invisible now. You can see the old overflow I had. When I had my 14" fan it was tucked down nice and low, but after the C7 fan was installed, I had to relocate to the fender brace temporarily.



Here's what it looked like before. Not a great picture, but you can see it doesn't flow in that location.



That's all for now. Hoping to start on the passenger side frame connector tonight.

Cheers,
Ryan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
909 Posts
Ryan, nice work on the rear end, should be able to handle that extra power you have now. I've got a 8.5" truetrac that's in the works with 30 spline Moser axles for later on in the year.
Its great to be able to do a lot of the work yourself while saving some dough. Simon.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
719 Posts
Discussion Starter · #425 ·
I've been plugging away working on the frame connectors. I made some good progress so I'll post up some pictures. I can't just take a weekend and knock them out, so I'm posting up the progress I make in 1-2 hour sessions.

Once I got the templates laid out, I scribed the lines and made the cuts. Now since my interior is completely installed, I had to get creative on how to avoid damaging it. Since we regularly get large boxes from Target, I decided to use one for a "tent" and keep the sparks inside this little box.



Then I cut out these seat plates to get to the cuts underneath.





The overall fitment is pretty good for the first test fit. I do have a few gaps larger than I would have liked, but nothing that can't be fixed. What I used for my first cut was a 3' long metal ruler and made sure to line up the template on the bottom with the ruler to connect the rear frame rail with the front. That way I knew that my one line was very straight. I then trimmed with a pair of metal shears until I could fit the connector up.



DSE makes the connectors a little long on the front so that you can trim to fit closely to your frame. they say it should be 1/2" from the front of the frame connector to the back of the sub-frame. I used my handy bandsaw which made really nice clean cuts.



Tacked the end cap in place and then fully welded it up. I had to play around with my settings at first so there were a few more stitches than I wanted, but great penetration so It's all good.





I then test fit the frame plates and assumed they were all the same at first, but they aren't. Make sure that you are using the inner/outer when you mock them up. The ends of the sub-frame are just slightly different.



I clamped them in place and made sure it had a really tight fit. Then put some tack welds on to hold them in place.







I then repeated the process on the driver's side. Everything was the same with one exception, the rear frame rail fitment. The passenger side was nice and tight and the width was going to tie in nicely. Once welded and flap disked, it will blend in very seamlessly. However, the driver's side was about 3/16" too wide at the taper.



That gap was too large to overcome, so I had to modify it. Wasn't really expecting to do that, but we are building custom cars so not completely out of left field. I measured the amount that I needed to narrow it, then cut a pie shaped piece out of it. That large metal ruler came in handy for this too.



Note that I added two reference lines to put the frame rail in the same spot. After I increased the taper, it fit just like the other side.



Welded up the seam and hit with the flap disk until it disappeared.



At this point both sides have been mocked up and fit pretty good. Time to get the frame plates welded to the frame connectors. I stopped over to my dad's for that though since he has a bigger welder that can weld the 1/4" frame plates to the 1/8" connectors.

I still need to play around with his welder since I don't use it all the time. His welder has always had way more welding spatter than mine. I had to chisel them off and grind smooth when I got home. One of these days I'll get a larger welder.





This was my best weld for the day, definitely need more practice.



Then yesterday I was able to get some time in the garage I got the frame connectors welded to my frame. I welded them on the outside and inside.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
719 Posts
Discussion Starter · #426 ·
Hit my picture limit. Continued...

They tuck up really nicely. I'm really happy that I went with these connectors. They are definitely more involved to install, but I think will do a better job of tying the frames together.





I still need to weld the frame rails to the torque box and inside on the floor pans. As well as a few other areas, but I'm hoping to get that all done this week. Then I can paint and seam seal.

I'll be happy to get this project done and out the way.

Cheers,
Ryan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
719 Posts
Discussion Starter · #427 ·
I made some more progress on the car, and finished up everything but welding in the seat plates that I had to cut out in the beginning. Now that the connectors are are welded to the front and rear frames, I could focus on connecting them inside the car. Like others have said, the toughest part was connecting the 1/8" frame connectors to the light gauge steel floor pans. It wasn't bad, just have to get the settings right or you can easily melt through the thinner material. I opted to make the welds hotter so that I could get good penetration on the connectors, then just dipped down to touch the pan for a split second. It worked really well and I'm pleased with the results.





Now that the top side was completely welded, I went back and had to drop the leaf spring perch down to finish welding a little section that was inaccessible. I wanted to make sure that most of the welding was done before I went to this step so that I didn't tweak anything.



Once everything was welded to the frame connectors, I went through and painted everything with an oil based paint that I'm a big fan of. It brushes on and creates a really smooth finish when cured. It looks really glossy right now, but will turn Satin when cured. I need to go back and weld in those seat plates and then I'll be 100% finished with the install. Already the car feels much tighter when I jacked up the car on one corner. I think this will make a big difference.





I can't wait to get this wrapped up so that I can get the interior back together. I bought some parts that came in for when I recover the rear seats as well as the right dome light switch. The one I have is too short and will occasionally come on when the door is shut.



The front wheel on the car had some curb rash and it has always bugged me. I was looking on eBay and happened to find that was kept as a full size spare in the trunk and the site had a 20% off deal. Got it for under $200 with a like new tire.





Another thing that has bugged me is the rear view mirror I had in the car was original, but very badly deteriorating. I found a guy who had one local and will be swapping that out soon.





The screw I had that had a better finish was damaged a little so I thought I would try the old steel wool trick. Pretty amazing the difference! Not perfect, but way better.





I'm going to stop and grab some burlap and new seat foam so that I can reupholster the rear seats. Hoping to get this all wrapped up in the next few weeks.

Thanks,
Ryan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
719 Posts
Discussion Starter · #428 ·
Made some great progress over the weekend. I can finally call the frame connector install finished. All that was left was welding in the seat riser sections that I had to cut out for the install. Welded those up and sprayed a little paint.



I realized that there should have been a trunk divider which I never had installed when I first put the car together, so I grabbed one with the jute insulation on it. Hopefully that will quiet the car down a little. I also cleaned my seatbelts with hot water, Oxy clean and a little dish soap. The water was black, and I had to do that twice. Looks like they are a little sun faded.



Note the date code 1968 original belts!



Next up was recovering the rear seats. I got busy and didn't take any pictures during the disassembly or recovering process. I added new burlap and kept the original reinforced burlap for added strength. I re-used the cotton padding, but added a 1.5" layer of foam on top. That really filled out the seat covers and gave more support. I used a hog ring kit and carefully installed them all as well as installing some reinforcement wires to help the hog rings not to pull out. I'm not sure why they didn't come with those, but they were simple to install. I used some scrap 12/3 ga wiring I had left over from a house wiring project. I separated the wires into the individual sections and it worked great. Plus the copper will take a lot longer to corrode than a steel wire will rust. Here they are all done. I left them in my boiler room and used a steamer on the wrinkles, but they weren't coming out. I was hoping that they would have come out smoother.



Then yesterday it was in the 50s and sunny so I put them outside for a few hours. BINGO! All the wrinkles were gone on the top of the seat back and the crease line was gone on the seat bottom! That was the ticket and now I'm thrilled with how they came out. Better than I expected actually. Not bad for my first time.





I couldn't help myself, I had to install them last night. Wow what a difference! Little bummed about my sail panels though and how they are almost delaminating...



I also got my new to me rear view mirror installed. It's wayy better than the original one that I had.



I'm hoping to plug away this week and get the carpet and front seats re-installed. It will be nice to have the car back together again.

Ryan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
719 Posts
Discussion Starter · #431 ·
I checked last night and the sunvisors clear by about 1/2" on both sides. I appreciate you bringing it up though. Didn't even give it a thought.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,340 Posts
Will that mirror clear the visors? A lot of work for a race car. Very detailed for sure. If you need anymore insulation, Styrofoam works great, they use it in the new cars, lightweight and cheap. Enjoy your progress.
I checked last night and the sunvisors clear by about 1/2" on both sides. I appreciate you bringing it up though. Didn't even give it a thought.
I can only imagine how many pennies you have to pinched to build your car. Having built 37 F bodies, thinking of all the mods, I went with the full frame Chevelle with a built LS6 profile. Less mods and I never even come close to using the power and I built it for less than the budget of 30k. oh well the fun is in the build.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
719 Posts
Discussion Starter · #433 ·
Been plugging away this weekend to get the interior buttoned up. The easiest one was getting the rear seat bottom installed. Wow, that is a huge difference from the original white seats.



Two years ago:



I also put a little elbow grease into my sill plates. While they are not in the best condition, I picked them up at a swap meet along with the RS turn signals from an original RS/Z28 car. Amazing how that aluminum polish cleaned them up.





Finished up my 4th Gen Nova overflow jug swap. Turned out so great, I'm so happy I found that as an option. I love how it tucks away in the fender, and the script matches the era perfectly.



I also got the shroud pieces and CAI painted with the Trim Black that I painted the rest of my engine bay. Turned out really nice. I'm glad that I painted the CAI, I think it looks a lot better than the polished aluminum.





I also wanted to finalize the supercharger reservoir bracket. I temporarily mounted it last summer and never got around to making a mount. Well because I was driving it haha. My father in law stopped over on night after work and wanted to work on something so I gave him the task of making the bracket. He did a fantastic job, just what I was looking to do.







All done with the lines re-routed and cleaned up.



With that, I decided to clean up the car inside and out. I never cleaned it up before I put the car away last winter... No time like the present!





Cleaned up the engine bay too. I think this is what the final form will look like.





Just to prove that I do drive this car in the winter, I backed down my driveway and grabbed some cool wintery shots. I was on the fence about it, but I'm glad I did. The pictures turned out great. Really cool background. I really like the first one, when the sun peaked out and gave better lighting.





Well I'm going to call the car done for now. Can't wait for spring!!

Cheers,
Ryan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
719 Posts
Discussion Starter · #434 ·
Well, I'm really proud of the car that I've built, but I've decided to put it on the chopping block. I've been thinking about getting another project, but I can't have two. I've had a lot of fun building and restoring this car, but it's time for me to move on.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
719 Posts
Discussion Starter · #437 ·
All good things must come to an end, and it's no different for the Penny Pincher Camaro and I. Sorry for the cliché, but a lot of blood, sweat and tears went into this build and I have learned so much in the process. My spot in life has changed from when I first bought this car and with a growing family I'll need something bigger. I feel really good that I was able to revive an old Camaro and bring new life to it. The guy that bought it is really excited for it and is not a re-seller so that makes me feel so much better about the sale. I was able to take the car from a broken down car, to running/driving on it's 50th anniversary. I was able to swap in 3 different engines, with the final being an absolute beast. It was also the first car that I've ever had with any forced induction. I owe a lot to that car, but in the end we are only caretakers of these cars and now it will live on for another 50+ years.

Here's a few send off pictures of the car before, during and after it was loaded up on it's way to Los Angeles.

I wanted to get a proper picture of myself with the car before I sold it, so I got a quick one before it was loaded on the trailer.



It was in good company too.











I'd like to thank everyone here that has helped me along the way with parts, advice/suggestions, critiques, or other support. Great community here and I look forward to sharing my next project when it comes along. It's likely going to be a 2 door wagon of some sort. I want to find a solid body late 50s or early 60s wagon with really cool patina. Ford, Chevy or other. Not sure what it will be but I'll know it when I see it.

Cheers,
Ryan
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,507 Posts
Bummer, my 68 is my first car when I was 18 and now 65 in 50 days it won't leave until after i do. I'll leave instructions for my wife. Being from Venezuela she will get what is asked or more.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
719 Posts
Discussion Starter · #440 ·
Thanks guys. It's bittersweet for me. It may be strange for some, but I think I may enjoy building them more than driving them. Now that it's done, I'm sad to see it go, but it went to a great guy in LA, Cali.
 
421 - 440 of 442 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top