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Discussion Starter #1
A little about me:
I'm a 42 year old accountant that grew up in BFE Texas and moved to Canada 20 years ago. From the time I was 16 I wanted to build a classic car. Now I'm old enough to know better, but still too young to care.

About my 1968 Camaro Project:
I bought it in August and thought it was in pretty good shape. It ran and drove.The previous owner took out the interior. The floors boards and rockers needed repair, but the quarter panels were perfect. The trunk floor seemed solid (coated in POR15). I wasn't able to get under the car, but it seemed pretty good. Got it home and up on blocks. Dropped the gas tank to clean it out and found the tank support brackets were rusted out. Then I noticed the frame rails were rusty. So I decided I better tear this pig down and rebuild it. I have spent the last 6 months (evenings and weekends) taking it apart and formulating a plan of attack. I also started a youtube channel to document my progress.

Two things I've never done, work on a car and edit videos. It's a fun learning experience on both fronts. I'll add pictures as soon as I figure out how. It keeps telling me my attachment is too large. (Not the first time I've heard that) Any suggestions on how to make my pictures smaller would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.
 

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Great start to a good project.

I personally would never crawl under the car as it’s supported in the video.
 

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I would install a 1 piece floor. Much cleaner install than patch work.
 

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Great start to a good project.

I personally would never crawl under the car as it’s supported in the video.
Thanks, I am really enjoying it. It keeps my wheels turning.

The cribbing performed amazing.16" 2x4s screwed together with 2x2 screwed in for chocks made a pretty solid base. I rocked that thing and shoved on it and the car never moved an inch. I was surprised at how sturdy it was. Saftey first.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Yeah, I'm looking at

Replacement parts: floor pan, trunk floor, frame rails,mini tubs, inner tp and outer tp, outer rockers and shoulder panels.
Rust Repair parts:lower cowl, front of dash, driver side front door jamb, passenger side roof, passenger side door and where ever else it may be lurking.

It'll be a long road. It's gotta be done and I'm going to give it my best. I have already got the front subframe assembly DEtatched with the engine, transmission, suspension and steering still Attached. The rear suspension and axle have been removed as well as the windshield and side glass. I'm currently working on removing the back window. It's a good challenge. I have ordered jig plans from FirstGenJigs, hopefully here by Easter. Before I start building a jig I want to remove the doors and find a place to store the drive train. May need a sea can in the back yard. Wife would kill me. I'm thinking lean-to shed and fire up the engine to heat the garage.... Thoughts?
 

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Seems like a good plan.

Don’t know about running the engine to heat the garage. I would be concerned about carbon monoxide.
 

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Brett - Leander, Texas 1969 SS396
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Usually, people move TO Texas. Good luck on your project. Is that a Canadian Camaro? If so, you should be able to obtain documentation on it.

Brett.....
 

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Cool project. I admire your willingness to dive in without having worked on cars much.

I look forward to your future videos. As a fellow Texan, I had to laugh when I heard you say no bueno. Bet that gets laughs up there. Take care with those blocks. My concern would be them slipping on the floor. Perhaps consider getting a lift for this project. Good luck.
 

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Well it looks like you got yourself a big project there. If it was me, I would considering getting yourself a rotisserie and have the car blasted down to bare metal to see what else could be lurking. This will also help you when replacing floor pans or the cowl panel as you will know exactly where all the holes are and find sound metal.

We will all be watching! Good luck.:beers:
 

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I’ve subscribed to the you tube channel too in order to follow along, I just completed my 68 last year and it was my first complete disassembly restoration. I used a rotisserie on mine and it was a lifesaver especially with having to do the floors. I’ll be checking in and if I can offer any helpful input based on my experience I’ll certainly do so. Best of luck and get yourself a factory assembly manual if you don’t already have one, it is a great resource (as is this site and the great folks on it)
 

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Seems like a good plan.

Don’t know about running the engine to heat the garage. I would be concerned about carbon monoxide.
I was going to pipe the coolant into the garage and run it through a radiator with a fan, but that's too much work. It would be funny though.
 

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Usually, people move TO Texas. Good luck on your project. Is that a Canadian Camaro? If so, you should be able to obtain documentation on it.

Brett.....
Hey Brett, I have a tendency to do things backwards. I love it here. I just wish the winters were a little shorter and warmer. I'm not sure about the history on the car. I should call the guy I bought it from and get some more details. I believe he was the second owner. Thanks for the luck.:grin2:
 

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Cool project. I admire your willingness to dive in without having worked on cars much.

I look forward to your future videos. As a fellow Texan, I had to laugh when I heard you say no bueno. Bet that gets laughs up there. Take care with those blocks. My concern would be them slipping on the floor. Perhaps consider getting a lift for this project. Good luck.
Thanks, I'm not afraid to screw it up. I'll just do my best.

I'm making videos everytime I'm in the garage now. If I can improve my editing skills they should get better. I'd love to get a lift, but I lack corporate funding at the moment, and my garage ceiling is only 8'6". LOL
 

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Subscribed to your YouTube channel since I love watching others wrench besides myself and because I used to own a 1968 Z/28 which I sold in 1974. A friend of mine owns it today.

Hey Mark, thanks for subscribing. Hopefully I get some good wrench time this weekend. It's freaking cold out there. That is a sweeeet Z! I'm glad it went to a good home. Are you currently working on anything?
 

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Well it looks like you got yourself a big project there. If it was me, I would considering getting yourself a rotisserie and have the car blasted down to bare metal to see what else could be lurking. This will also help you when replacing floor pans or the cowl panel as you will know exactly where all the holes are and find sound metal.

We will all be watching! Good luck.:beers:

Hey Joe, thanks. I have been thinking about getting a rotisserie, but I have to replace the whole bottom side of the car. That's not going to leave much to attach to the rotisserie at the rear. I want to sandblast it, but I'm afraid of it rusting more while I'm working on it at my turtle pace. I'm open to suggestions.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I’ve subscribed to the you tube channel too in order to follow along, I just completed my 68 last year and it was my first complete disassembly restoration. I used a rotisserie on mine and it was a lifesaver especially with having to do the floors. I’ll be checking in and if I can offer any helpful input based on my experience I’ll certainly do so. Best of luck and get yourself a factory assembly manual if you don’t already have one, it is a great resource (as is this site and the great folks on it)
Hey Bill, Thanks for subscribing. I'll take all the input I can get. I would like to put it on a rotisserie, but I don't want the body to flex or sag when I cut the floor out of it. I guess I could use a ton of bracing. I got the AIM and the Body by Fisher manual as well. I have been studying them when I can. I never would have attempted this project without all the fantastic gear heads on here and youtube. Cheers!
 

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I think your road ahead is about as long as the road from BFE Texas to Canada, but I like the enthusiasm. But ??
Which BFE TX are you from? We have a lot of those.
What made you flee TX?
As an accountant you will be shocked at what you are going to spend.
Winter? What is that?

That said, welcome to the community and there is a wealth of information and advice and opinion here.
Good luck on your project.
 

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I think your road ahead is about as long as the road from BFE Texas to Canada, but I like the enthusiasm. But ??
Which BFE TX are you from? We have a lot of those.
What made you flee TX?
As an accountant you will be shocked at what you are going to spend.
Winter? What is that?

That said, welcome to the community and there is a wealth of information and advice and opinion here.
Good luck on your project.

Yeah, I'm expecting this project to be 6 years or so. Hopefully shorter, but time will tell.
I'm from a small town near Lubbock. I moved to Canada for love, but I stayed for the poutine. (fries and gravy with cheese curds) My expectant budget keeps going up with every rusty bolt I snap. Winter is that special time of year between October and May when the daylight hours are diminished and the items of clothing are layered. LOL
 

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but I stayed for the poutine. (fries and gravy with cheese curds)
OH MY GOD Get this guy some CHILI before he completely zones out!
They got Crawfish up there?
 
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