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Discussion Starter · #781 ·
Lloyd, I was wondering if you have not assembled your RS headlight door hinge (GM PN 3945711) can you check something for me? Rest the 4 "points" on a flat surface. Does it lay flat with no rocking? Both my hinges do not lay flat, but have an opposite "rack". Either both were in an accident or were purposely bent to line the doors up. I need to know before I attempt to make them flat again :) Thx
Kevin. I'll check and let you know later in the week when I'm back in the shop.
 

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Discussion Starter · #782 ·
Lloyd, I was wondering if you have not assembled your RS headlight door hinge (GM PN 3945711) can you check something for me? Rest the 4 "points" on a flat surface. Does it lay flat with no rocking? Both my hinges do not lay flat, but have an opposite "rack". Either both were in an accident or were purposely bent to line the doors up. I need to know before I attempt to make them flat again :) Thx
Kevin, I tested one of the door hinges as requested on my steel bench and it sits dead flat, no rocking.

 

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Discussion Starter · #783 · (Edited)
Had some time last night so I decided to work on the RS washer motor PN 5045605. There are very few serviceable parts inside the assembly and from others' experience, attempting to take the motor housing tower apart to replace brushes etc can lead to a world of hurt. I also avoided any thoughts of taking the base plate apart to access the rotating assembly as the square rivets are difficult to work with without making a mess of them (they aren't actually rivets, they are punch formed when the plate is sealed during manufacture), so instead I bench tested the motor for low and high speed operation, then stripped and repainted the base and tower housing paying attention not to damage the original brass grounding strap and fully masking the electrical contacts. Also re-plated the original P head marking motor-to-firewall bolts clear zinc (along side the other unique fasteners). More to follow on the re-assembly and the washer pump.


 

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Discussion Starter · #785 ·
Working on the washer pump, I plan to transfer new mechanicals to the original distribution head which is off-white compared to new and NOS washer pumps which are white or black. Also, the pump's black plastic cover on NOS units differs from originals. Will post some photos as work progresses in the coming days.
 

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Had some time last night so I decided to work on the RS washer motor PN 5045605. There are very few serviceable parts inside the assembly and from others' experience, attempting to take the motor housing tower apart to replace brushes etc can lead to a world of hurt. I also avoided any thoughts of taking the base plate apart to access the rotating assembly as the square rivets are difficult to work with without making a mess of them (they aren't actually rivets, they are punch formed when the plate is sealed during manufacture), so instead I bench tested the motor for low and high speed operation, then stripped and repainted the base and tower housing paying attention not to damage the original brass grounding strap and fully masking the electrical contacts. Also re-plated the original P head marking motor-to-firewall bolts clear zinc (along side the other unique fasteners). More to follow on the re-assembly and the washer pump.


Was your wiper motor housing ink stamped originally? I had to duplicate the stamp on a 67 wiper motor for a customer. I found a company that sells an accurate stamp kit. Let me know. I do not follow these threads very often.
 

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Discussion Starter · #787 · (Edited)
Was your wiper motor housing ink stamped originally? I had to duplicate the stamp on a 67 wiper motor for a customer. I found a company that sells an accurate stamp kit. Let me know. I do not follow these threads very often.
There were no stamps on the "605" RS wiper motor housing. There is a (yellow) ink stamp on the plastic washer pump cover and (2) on the RS solenoid. Nothing else I could locate.



Washer pump cover


RS Headlight washer solenoid
 

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I really like the way the bolts turned out. Are you doing the clear zinc in your shop or do you send them out to be plated? Wasn’t sure if have the process documented in your thread or not. I’m also curious on how you prep the fasteners before plating. I have the phosphate process figured out but have yet to dive into clear zinc for DIY.

Thank you
 

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Discussion Starter · #789 ·
I really like the way the bolts turned out. Are you doing the clear zinc in your shop or do you send them out to be plated? Wasn’t sure if have the process documented in your thread or not. I’m also curious on how you prep the fasteners before plating. I have the phosphate process figured out but have yet to dive into clear zinc for DIY.

Thank you
Thanks. All of our zinc and cadmium plating (and chromating) is done in-shop using Caswell solutions. I haven't documented the processes in the build thread but could if there is broad interest. We started using Caswell about 18 months ago and expected it to be more or less plug-n-play, it isn't. Many calls were made to their support line which proved frustrating. I submit its likely less expensive to outsource zinc / cad plating than do the work in-shop however its a nice to have particularly as we like to restore components one by one so its easier to stay organized, avoid losing small parts and fasteners, and it eliminates the plating shop trips and wait time. Our good results came down to learning by trial and error, many times over, before we developed an understanding of the undocumented science that you won't find in their publications nor from Caswell's support team. Since you asked about preparation, we first de-grease the part so its oil and grime free then immerse / soak it in muriatic acid (HCI) to remove any residual contamination and prior plating (until the chemical reaction stops). After that we thoroughly rinse the part in water to ensure all traces of HCI are gone followed by dry media blasting then vapor blasting so the part has a clean, smooth, burnished surface, ready for plating. The plating process involves wire, amperage, heat, PH and so on.
 

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Thanks for the explanation. I use a local plater and they‘re very reasonable. I can usually get a galllon zip lock bag done for $35, minimum fee. They don’t do any prep, just zinc whatever I give them. With phosphate I can go from blast to installed in less than a few hours. Keeps the project moving vs waiting weeks. Just started a C2 project and these have tons of clear zinc, compared to a Camaro.

The little bit the I‘ve had done come out cloudy, from the plater. I’m bead blasting. I need a smooth finish before it goes to plating and not the blasted finish. Was thinking of trying a tumbler but that won’t help with larger parts.

Thanks for sharing, project looks fantastic.
 

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Discussion Starter · #791 ·
Thanks for the explanation. I use a local plater and they‘re very reasonable. I can usually get a galllon zip lock bag done for $35, minimum fee. They don’t do any prep, just zinc whatever I give them. With phosphate I can go from blast to installed in less than a few hours. Keeps the project moving vs waiting weeks. Just started a C2 project and these have tons of clear zinc, compared to a Camaro.

The little bit the I‘ve had done come out cloudy, from the plater. I’m bead blasting. I need a smooth finish before it goes to plating and not the blasted finish. Was thinking of trying a tumbler but that won’t help with larger parts.

Thanks for sharing, project looks fantastic.
With a commercial plater nearby who does quality work, doesn't lose small parts and is that inexpensive I wouldn't do any zinc plating in-shop either - not worth it. You are correct that good prep is your friend with zinc plating, the nicer the part is going in the better the result. Phosphating produces a slightly textured surface, is a forgiving process and works well with dry media blasting. Good luck with the C2 project!
 

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Discussion Starter · #792 ·
Will post an update in the coming days, have started travelling for business so available project time is shorter, I now have the small parts I need to rebuild the RS washer pump (will post a step by step) so that's next. Was at MCACN last week which is always a source of "information and inspiration" if you're tackling a project. The first edition of the 1969 Camaro Legends Judging Manual has been published and it's a very good foundation to build on. Was nice to receive a credit in the book.

 

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Discussion Starter · #793 ·
Still working on the wiper / washer rebuild, should be adding it to the thread in a few days. I purchased a set of NOS exhaust hangers to complement the Gartner system that I installed a few weeks ago. Not a big improvement but its NOS.

NOS hanger on the left and Gartner on the right. Original hangers were natural steel whereas the Gartner hanger is clear/silver zinc plated to prevent rust.


Hangers installed. Of course the NOS hangers have stamped GM part numbers Right: 3964858, Left: 3964633


 

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Discussion Starter · #794 ·
Working on a few areas so will have more posts over the holidays. In the meantime I got the rear wheel well trim back from polishing so I thought I would install them now rather than risk damage setting them aside for later date. They are NOS and were in ancient packages however they did have some shelf wear so polishing dealt with all that. Originals and some NOS rear wheel well trim have a "C" cut-out as shown on the vertical section of the leading and trailing sides of the trim. They did require some massaging to get them to fit tight to the body and I used a series of small clamps prior to securing them to the fender lip.



Note the C cut-out on the trailing side of the trim



 

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Discussion Starter · #795 · (Edited)
Another small side project I could fit in the available time I had yesterday was to re-stripe one of RS headlight door vacuum hoses. Original RS vac hoses consisted of 3 green stripe, 3 red stripe, black (unstriped) and 2 yellow stripe hoses together with some T connectors. The aftermarket RS hose kits use an off-red "fuchsia" stripe instead of a true red stripe and the same fuchsia stripe instead of an orange stripe hose. At present the aftermarket fuchsia stripe hose is accepted for Legends judging (Pg 121 Judging Manual) in lieu of the correct red stripe hoses however not in place of the orange striped hose which runs from the vacuum tank to the dash mounted light switch. In order to change the fuchsia stripe to the correct orange stripe I first secured the hose on my worktable using a plastic clamp then stretched it clocking the stripe face up. I removed the fuchsia stripe using Xylene and a microfiber towel which also softened the rubber so it was more receptive to paint. To lay out the new strip line I'm using an automotive pinstripe stencil tape, The Striper, from Finesse Pinstriping Inc instead of freehanding or using a Buegler striping tool for a better result and a crisp edge. I applied the pinstripe stencil tape to the hose, which adhered well, then applied orange acrylic water based artist paint that I first diluted slightly for better flow. I applied the paint with a foam roller being careful to "color inside the lines" allowing 15 minutes to dry between the two coats. The finished product is what I was looking for and the acrylic paint should not peel or flake off.

Pinstriping stencil tape, acrylic paint and fuchsia striped hose clamped to the worktable, stretched to length


Fuchsia stripe removed from hose with Xylene ready to receive stencil tape


Stencil tape applied to the hose prior to peeling off the clear layer


Removing clear tape layer to expose area that will receive paint


Applying the first of two thin coats of acrylic orange paint to create new stripe



Prior to stencil tape removal


The re-striped RS vacuum hose



Test Fit
 

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That's cool Lloyd. For me, another solution to a future problem. Looking forward to more of your posts.
 

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Discussion Starter · #798 ·
That's cool Lloyd. For me, another solution to a future problem. Looking forward to more of your posts.
Great detail. Nice to witness a true restorer instead of most guys that install reproduction parts that come via FedEx.
Thanks guys, after a closer look at the other hoses (yellow, green and "red") I plan to correct them all.
 

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Discussion Starter · #799 ·
The windshield washer pump needed attention as the pump mechanism wasn't working. The RS pump has a supplementary solenoid that bolts to the wiper motor mounting plate above the wiper motor housing and provides additional capacity to supply the windshield washer nozzles so the main pump can supply the headlight washers. The plumbing is fairly intricate and in my case the solenoid pump was non-functioning and the main washer pump piston had failed (case cracked) and had yellowed over the years so it needed freshening. Reproduction pumps use a bright-white plastic which wasn't used originally, instead original (and NOS) washer pumps use a off-white creme coloured plastic.

My original RS-only wiper-washer motor 5045605 and pump assembly


On Non-RS washer pumps the (3) primary hose connections are oriented forward facing and on RS optioned 69s they face left (drivers side).




ID Foil (print dissolved)



Date Coded RS solenoid pump October 15,1968

 
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