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Discussion Starter #441
That's good work there. It's the little things that really matter.
Thank you. You are one of the builders that have set a high bar. I am trying to keep up.
 

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Discussion Starter #442
Rebuild Wiper/Windshield Switch

My wiper switch was reading 102.4 ohms in one position. It should have read 0 ohms.

[/url]wiper motor 80 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

I removed the switch from the plastic dash. I carefully disassembled the switch. The washer portion of the switch’s copper contacts were green. The main contact that operates the motor was pitted. The old grease was dry. The inside part of the switch was full of dust and dirt.
[/url]wiper motor 81 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]


[/url]wiper motor 82 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

[/url]wiper motor 83 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

[/url]wiper motor 84 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

These are the parts of the switch after disassembly. I washed the switch with electrical contact cleaner many times. I cleaned the copper surfaces with 800 grit sandpaper. I used a little of dielectric grease on the contact surfaces when I reassembled the switch.
[/url]wiper motor 85 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

Now it works.

[/url]wiper motor 86 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

My convertible top switch cannot be taken apart. It would sometimes stick in the UP position. I sprayed contact cleaner inside the switch and kept working it until the switch stop sticking.
 
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Discussion Starter #443
Rear Mounted Battery Part One:

Electricity is a contentious subject on this forum. I enjoy reading the threads, but I try to stay out of the fights. Sometimes I cannot stand it and I have to put in my two cents worth of opinion. On one thread, Mr. Shad (zboss86) asked about mounting a battery in the trunk of the car. I got on my high horse and wrote a novel why a street driven car should never have the battery in the trunk. He wrote back that he thought the post was long and he appreciated that I mentioned the approved type of cables that can be used with a car battery. I laughed at myself, he was right.

Since he thought it was important, so I will repeat the cables approved cable types. The Society of Automotive Engineers recommend three different cables:

1. SGT cable is acceptable. It conforms to SAE J-1127. It has 50 volt insulation 80 degree C insulation. It is the stiffest.

2. SGX cable. It conforms to SAE J-1127. It does everything the SGT cable can do but it is a higher temperature wire at 125 degree C. It costs more than SGT.

3. STX cable. It conforms to SAE J-1127. It is the thinnest for a given gauge. 50 volt, 125 degree C insulation.

4. SGT-M is a marine grade cable. It is a variation of SGT. The good thing about this cable is the insulation is self-extinguishing. It does not burn too easily. You can submerge it in water. It is a high dollar cable. The copper is tinned so it resists corrosion.

I bought a trunk mount battery kit from Jegs. Yes, I am going against my advice I gave Shad. The reason is the front of the car might be too heavy for the springs on my front subframe. I need to move some weight to the back.

The battery relocation kit was an impulse purchase. It was on sale and I got an extra discount for spending a certain amount of money. It is a universal kit that really does not fit my needs.

The tray was too big. It was 13 inches long. The battery tray was coated with a rubber compound. It began to peel off. The peeling rubber gave an excuse to cut the tray and make in shorter. I cut two, 1-inch, sections out of the ends and welded the tray back together.
[/url]battery 1 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]


[/url]battery 2 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

[/url]battery 3a by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

I was afraid the battery might pull off the trunk pan’s thin sheet metal if I get in a wreck. I fabricated a 3/16” plate to bolt to the battery tray. I coated the 3/16” plate and battery tray with Plasti Dip.
[/url]battery 4 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

I tapped the plate with ¼”x20 threads. The battery tray bolts to the plate in five places. The metal plate bolts to the car using two, 3/8” bolts, and one, 1/4“ bolt. All bolts have flat washers and lock washers. One of the 3/8 and ¼ bolts are fastened to the cocktail shaker reinforcement plate under the trunk pan. The other 3/8 bolt fastens to the thin trunk pan.

[/url]battery 6 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

[/url]battery 7 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

I bought a battery disconnect switch. It is made by Pollock but is sold by American Auto Wire. The large studs are rated at 180 amps continuous at 12 VDC. They can handle an intermittent surge of 1000 amps for 20 seconds. After 20 seconds the contacts have to cool down for 5 minutes. The small studs can handle a 20 amp load at 12 VDC. The lugs in the photo do not come with the switch. There was an existing hole in the wheelhouse to deck filler brace. I enlarged the hole and drilled another on for the pin alignment in the switch.
[/url]battery 8 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

[/url]battery 9 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

[/url]battery 10 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

This is the planned route for the battery cable. It will go along the wheelhouse and travel down the rocker panel. It will not interfere with the quarter panel window operation.

[/url]battery 11 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

The Jegs kit came with 16 feet of #2-gauge red wire. I think the original Firebird battery cable was a #4-gauge wire about six feet long. I did some voltage drop calculations to compare the two cables plus a 1/0 cable. Voltage used was 12.6 VDC, I measured the voltage drop using a 250 and 800 amp loads. 250 amps is the maximum starter amperage. 800 amps is just a number.

*******************#4 Gauge 6’*********#2 Gauge 14’*********1/0 Gauge 14’
******************250 amp**800 amp***250 amp**800 amp****250 amp*** 800 amp
Voltage drop:*******0.75******2.39******1.09******3.5*********0.69******2.20
Voltage at the starter: 11.85*****10.21*****11.51*****9.1*********11.91*****10.4

14 feet of #2 does not perform as well as 6 feet of #4. The 14 feet of 1/0 cable performs slightly better than 6 feet of #4. Therefore, the 1/0 cable is will be just as good, maybe a little better than the original factory cable.

Now the contentious part. Some people add fuses to the circuit. Others add a solenoid. A few add both fuses and a solenoid. I am not going to add any fuses or a solenoid.

Automobile manufacturers do not fuse the wire that goes from the battery to the starter. The alternator and the rest of the smaller wires are the ones that are fused. Why don’t they add a fuse or some other protective device on the starter cable? I am sure they have gone through several hundred scenarios of what would happen if a fuse is installed and what are the consequences if the cable is not fused. Obviously, the benefits of not adding a fuse outweigh the protection the fuse might provide.

Automobile manufacturers do not mount the starter solenoid next to the battery. The old Ford external solenoids were mounted on the firewall or the inner fender area. They never tried to protect the starter cable with a solenoid.

Fuses

I looked at the fuse curves for an ANL type fuse. For a battery that has 800 cold cranking amps, a 250 or 275 amp fuse would be a good selection. But then I started thinking about the battery. A battery’s current depends on how much it is charged, what the temperature is outside, and the age of the battery. A fixed value fuse might blow when the battery is new, and it is hot outside. But if the battery is old and cold, it might not burn and break the circuit. A car battery has a huge variance in its ability to provide current. There is no current level that I can choose that will ensure that the fuse will blow in a fault condition and not blow in a nuisance condition.

A fuse will not protect the cable. It might blow and not allow the battery to rapidly discharge. But the fuse will only open when the cable is damaged, and it shorts to the car’s body.

Solenoid


I have read many threads why a second solenoid is added to the starter circuit next to the battery. They all state that the starter cable is only energized when the engine is started. A second cable is needed that runs from the alternator to the battery. The smaller, second cable is always energized. What makes the smaller cable impervious to damage compared to the larger starter cable?

I live in Texas. If I am driving down the road and my car looses electrical power, I will have to pull over on the shoulder of the highway. Someone who is full of road rage is going to shoot me because I slowed them down from 70 to 50 mph. If I don’t get shot, someone is going to rear end me because my emergency flashers don’t work. Mr. Matt lives up there in the Great White North. He is going to freeze to death in an hour sitting in his car waiting for a wrecker.

When I modify my car, I consider that my life is most important, and my safety is number one. Protecting the car and putting my life in danger is not an option. The fuse and solenoid methods might protect the car, but it does not protect me. Having the car not being able to start in an emergency situation, can cause me to die.

Everybody who mounts a battery in the trunk is afraid the starter cable is going to be damaged. I am afraid of the same thing. A solenoid and/or fuses protect the car after the cable is damaged. Why not be proactive, and protect the cable so the chance of it getting damaged, is slim to none?

I ran my cable in plastic conduit. The area around the wheelhouse has flexible liquid tight conduit and PVC conduit was used to run along the rocker.

[/url]battery 12 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

[/url]battery 13 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

[/url]battery 14 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

[/url]battery 15 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

[/url]battery 16 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

[/url]battery 17 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

[/url]battery 18 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

[/url]battery 19 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

The ½” conduit fits perfectly in the rocker. The carpet shields still fit with no modifications.

[/url]battery 20 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]
 

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Discussion Starter #444
Rear Mounted Battery Part Two:

The chances of the cable’s insulation failing, and the plastic conduit breaking are very remote. If the copper in the cable was able to touch the frame, there is nothing flammable along the conduit route. It is not run under a carpet or upholstery. It is not under the car to be scuffed by road debris and ignite a ruptured fuel line. It is laying against steel in the wheelhouse and rocker. It will burn the paint on the steel where the copper touched the metal but not much more.

I have not routed the conduit around the subframe. I need to mount the engine to see the best route for the conduit.

A 1/0 SGX cable is too big to fit in the ½” conduit. I did not use the approved battery cable. I used a 1/0 XHHW-2 cable with thinner insulation. It has a GR II rating, so it is gas and oil resistant. It is a 90 degree C cable with 600 volt insulation. It can be used in wet locations. This 1/0 will fit in a ½” conduit.

I pulled the cable through the conduit using a fish tape. I stripped the insulation off the end of the wire. I cut half of the conductors off at the insulation. I folded the rest of the conductors around the fish tape. Cutting half of the conductors makes the connection thinner so it is easier to pull.

[/url]battery 21 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

I clamped the fish tape closed with a pair of pliers and wrapped tape around the joint. The goal is to make the area start out small and gradually become the size of the cable. It is a lot easier to pull wire through a conduit if the joint is not a big ball of copper and tape.

[/url]battery 22 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

[/url]battery 23 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

[/url]battery 24 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]
 

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Very cool write up TP

I am a big fan of "bigger than stock" size battery cables be it front or rear mounted battery.

IDK what battery you will be using but I went with a 78 series side post only battery. I prefer the look and attachment of side post cables vs top clamp type.
 

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Discussion Starter #446
Very cool write up TP

I am a big fan of "bigger than stock" size battery cables be it front or rear mounted battery.

IDK what battery you will be using but I went with a 78 series side post only battery. I prefer the look and attachment of side post cables vs top clamp type.
I was going to use a side post battery. When I install the battery, I will have to shove it in place and clear the metal ledge just above the battery. A top post would increase the height and I do not have much room.

An AGM 78 series battery has provisions for a vent tube which is good for the trunk. A 78 series battery is 10 inches long. My battery tray that I cut is now 11 inches long.

Thank you for the advice. :smile2:
 

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Discussion Starter #447
Vapor Worx Fuel Controller Part One:

I bought a Vapor Worx fuel pressure controller to maintain 60-65 psig pressure in my fuel line. It is tuned for a GM LSA engine. The heart of the system is a module that converts 12 volt dc to a PWM square wave that powers the fuel pump. The PWM waveform simulates a variable DC voltage and allows the fuel pump to turn at different speeds. It has a fuel pressure sensor that provides feedback to the controller. It also uses the Manifold Absolute Pressure (MAP) as a feedback loop. I assume the fuel pressure sensor is the major feedback loop, but its response is slow. I assume the MAP sensor is used for transients that require the controller speed up or slow down the fuel pump when driver pushes the accelerator pedal to the floor or when he removes his foot from the pedal and he hits the brakes.

Not all fuel pumps are compatible with PWM control. VaporWorx has a list on their website that has the pumps that will work with this controller. A DC motor that has brushes should not be used with a PWM waveform. The PWM voltage causes the current to be discontinuous, and the brushes will fail prematurely. I think a vane type pump used in an inline type pump cannot be turned at variable speeds. A vane type pump is essentially either on or off. If the motor slows down, the pump no longer moves fuel. My GM fuel module uses a brushless DC motor with a turbine pump. It is one of the pumps that is compatible with a pulse width modulation waveform that allows the motor to turn at different speeds.

The Vapor Worx kit is complete. I need a special crimper to fasten the Delphi connectors. I also need a fuel pressure gauge to confirm the fuel pressure is correct. I used different wire loom around the fuel pump wiring.

This is a photo of the controller. This is a > $400.00 jewel. The second photo shows the trim screw on the side to adjust the fuel pressure setpoint. The third photo shows some the wiring harnesses. Not shown are the fuel pressure transducer and the fuel pump harness. One end of the harness is terminated with a connector. The user has to cut the wire to the correct length and fasten the Delphi connector on the other end. The wire appears to be GXL type but there are no markings on the wire to confirm this statement.

[/url]vapor 1 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

[/url]vapor 2 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

[/url]vapor 3 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

The controller converts the constant dc voltage from the battery to a PWM waveform. This on/off switching of the battery voltage to create the PWM waveform produces heat. The little controller can get hot from the switching of the voltage. I decided to add a piece of copper bar to the back side of the controller. The copper will provide some thermal mass to help dissipate the heat.
[/url]vapor 4 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

The front side of the controller has three metal posts that have 12 VDC connected to them. I do not want anything to inadvertently touch the posts and short out this $400.00 jewel. I fabricated a little metal cover for the controller. The bottom of the cover is open. I drilled tiny holes in the top of the cover to allow natural convection so that heat can be removed from the controller. The holes in the top are very small and nothing will fall through them. The inside of the metal cover is painted with Plasti Dip to help insulate it from the three posts on the controller.
[/url]vapor 5 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

[/url]vapor 6 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

[/url]vapor 7 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

[/url]vapor 8 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

[/url]vapor 9 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

[/url]vapor 10 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

[/url]vapor 11 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

[/url]vapor 12 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

The instructions state to mount the controller as close to the battery as possible. I have a hard time understanding general statements. The kit has a power wire that goes from the battery to the controller. It has an inline fuse. This wire is five feet long. I assume the controller should be less than five feet from the battery. I decided to mount the controller inside the trunk next to the battery disconnect switch. The two screws in the photo below show the location.
[/url]vapor 13 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

I drilled the copper bar so the nut will fit inside the bar. This will allow the copper bar fit flush with the convertible quarter panel brace.
[/url]vapor 14 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

This was my first attempt to mount the controller. It looks ok but the screws are too large. I cannot turn the nuts with a wrench because they rub against the black plastic. This method of fastening the controller will not work. It is too hard to access the screws and nuts for future servicing.
[/url]vapor 15 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

[/url]vapor 16 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

I bought some black rubber hardware that has a threaded insert. The head of the rubber will fit inside the copper bar. I drilled two more screws to mount the bar to the car. The bar will be fastened to the car and the rubber pieces will be held in place by the copper bar. Now the copper bar does not have to be removed when the controller is removed. The Phillips head bolts are turned around and are now easily accessible.

[/url]vapor 17 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

[/url]vapor 18 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]


[/url]vapor 19 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]
 

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Discussion Starter #448
Vapor Worx Fuel Controller Part Two:

I drilled a hole in the convertible quarter panel brace. It is next to the controller. The power wires will feed through the hole and fasten to the controller. The wires are completely hidden.

[/url]vapor 20 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

[/url]vapor 21 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

The fabricated metal cover that goes over the controller also covers the wire hole.
[/url]vapor 22 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

[/url]vapor 23 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

I bought a fuse block from…. Amazon. The fuse block will be mounted above the battery. It holds four fuses. One fuse is for the Vapor Worx controller, the second is for the convertible top motor, and the third is for the trunk light, last one is a spare.
[/url]vapor 24 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]


[/url]vapor 25 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

[/url]vapor 26 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

[/url]vapor 27 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

I put black heat shrink tubing over the yellow lug to help camouflage the connection. I ran a 6 gauge wire from the battery disconnect switch to the fuse block.
[/url]vapor 28 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

[/url]vapor 29 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

The first photo below is the fuel pump wires. The two smaller wires, (brown and black) are for the fuel level sender. I removed the fuel level float assembly from my fuel pump module. Therefore, I do need the two smaller wires, so I removed them. I have an external tube type fuel level sender that is wired separately. The next photo shows the fuel pressure wire harness. Both cables will be terminated at the Vapor Worx controller.

A DC waveform is a flat line. It has a frequency of 0 hertz. My house voltage is sinewave with a frequency of 60 hertz. A PWM waveform has a square wave shape. It is a combination of many sinewaves of different frequencies that are added together. The sharp corners of a square wave are made by lot of high frequency components. The high frequency parts can cause noise in wires that are near the fuel pump power leads. Notice I twisted the wires together. Twisted wires will reduce noise and EMI. The instructions do not say to twist them, but this is cheap insurance. I assume the fuel pressure transducer voltage range is 0 – 5 volts. It could be very susceptible to noise.

[/url]vapor 30 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

[/url]vapor 31 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

I ran the fuel pump wires in plastic sheathing. The ¼’ size is perfect. It also can be clamped with the same stainless clamps I used for the emergency brake lines.
[/url]vapor 32 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

These are heavy duty sticky backs. They use epoxy glue to stick them in place. I used these under the car to route the wires. They do not fall off. The black color blends with the bottom of the car.
[/url]vapor 34 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

[/url]vapor 35 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

Vapor Worx instructions state that the fuel pressure transducer should be mounted within two feet of the fuel pump. My fuel pump is connected to a two feet flexible hose. I mounted the fuel pressure transducer at the end of my flexible fuel line inside the QuadraLink C channel. This location is easily accessible. I will not have to drop the fuel tank if the pressure sensor fails.

I replaced some of the single stainless clamps on the fuel line and vent line. I replaced them with double clamps. One side of the clamp holds the fuel or vent line. The other side holds the wiring harness. I also glued some sticky backs to the C channel to hold the wiring harnesses.

I tried to keep the PWM fuel pump lines and the fuel pressure lines separate to prevent noise issues. The do run in parallel with each other when they enter the inside of the trunk.

[/url]vapor 36a by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]


[/url]vapor 37a by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

[/url]vapor 38 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

The wiring in the last photo will be covered by the convertible top bag.
 

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Discussion Starter #449
Thanks to the person who gave this build thread a 5 star rating. :smile2::smile2:
 

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Vapor Worx Fuel Controller Part Two:
[/url]vapor 25 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]
AHA! Now I understand the comment in my thread. :grin2:

Very impressive. I used the sticky backs too but different loom. I’m really glad I didn’t do the PWM fuel system just because I am so tired of wiring! I am really happy with the simplicity of the mechanical regulation for my system. By the way, it’s tuned for the LSA? Powerplant hint?

I need to go take some more pictures.
 

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Discussion Starter #451
Think about it Matt, Pontiac engines were known to be torque monsters. I have to add a positive displacement super charger on a LS engine just to have the low end torque needed to be a Pontiac. It is a tradition. I have no choice.

This is why the battery was moved to the trunk. My engine is top heavy.
 
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Just wanted to thank you for taking the time to document your build. I was having a tough time deciding on on how to route my Vintage Air hoses, I am at least now pointed in a direction and have a plan. Great photographs and explanations made it easy to see how the bulkhead connector would be a better option for me. Ordered it last week, got the holes drilled and progress is being made instead of staring at the thing.
 

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Discussion Starter #454
Just wanted to thank you for taking the time to document your build. I was having a tough time deciding on on how to route my Vintage Air hoses, I am at least now pointed in a direction and have a plan. Great photographs and explanations made it easy to see how the bulkhead connector would be a better option for me. Ordered it last week, got the holes drilled and progress is being made instead of staring at the thing.
Thanks for reading it. I am convinced that about 4 people read this thread. Maybe now I am up to five.

You are not the only one who has a hard time pulling the trigger. Here is a quote from one of my posts:

This took 18 hours of work. Most of the time was spent walking around in circles and trying to convince myself the axle is in the correct position.
The next weekend, I mounted the axle back on the jig and welded the pan hard bar bracket. I had to trim it to make it fit tightly against the Ford 9 inch.
 

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Discussion Starter #455
Battery Cables:

I used a very fine strand 1/0 copper cable to connect the battery to ground and to the battery positive to the switch. The overall size of the fine strand copper wire diameter is slightly larger than a regular multistrand cable. It is difficult to use the correct size lug with this wire. Some people trim off the outer copper strands so the wire will fit inside the lug’s hole. This is not a good practice. In the past, it was common practice to use a lug one size larger than the wire. In my case, a 2/0 lug would be selected.

This is no longer an acceptable method. UL was the first to outlaw this method about four years ago. The lug is crimped with a die. A 2/0 die will crimp the lug to a 2/0 size. The 1/0 cable will be loosely crimped in the 2/0 lug and the connection will get hot. It gets hot because the wire does not have a good physical connection and the internal resistance will heat up the lug. When the lug gets hot, the wire’s insulation will slowly melt away from the lug.

There are special lugs for fine strand cables. I did not have any in my stash. The special lugs have a flared end so the wire will slip into the hole. I flared a standard lug using a hammer and a conical shaped air hammer attachment. I flared just the very end of the lug.
[/url]battery 25 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

[/url]battery 26a by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

I cut the cable with my bandsaw. I made the wire round again with my slip joint plier.
[/url]battery 27 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

The little wires will flare out after the insulation is removed. I keep the insulation on the wire until I am ready to insert the wire in the lug.
[/url]battery 28 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

This is a fine strand cable with a lug installed. The flared end helps guide all the wires in the barrel of the lug. No wires were trimmed. No oversize lugs were used.
[/url]battery 29 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

[/url]battery 30 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

My battery is mounted in the trunk. It is common to bolt the ground cable to the frame rail. I did not want to drill a hole in my frame rail. I made a bonding plate out of some scrap steel. The little plate is ¼ inch thick and about 2.5 inches wide. It had three holes already drilled into it. I drilled out the center hole. I inserted the head of a 3/8” bolt in the hole and welded the hole shut. I drilled three more holes in the plate and tapped them ¼” x 20 threads.

The center bolt is made of stainless steel. It was welded to mild steel. A MIG welder needs stainless wire to join the two dissimilar metals together. If I used steel wire, the weld might crack as it cools.

There are only three types of nuts and bolts that should be used for electrical connections. They are stainless steel, silicon bronze, and galvanized steel. The common grade 5 zinc plated steel bolt should not be used. Aluminum bolts can be used for aluminum wire and lugs.

[/url]battery 31 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

[/url]battery 32 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

[/url]battery 33 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

This is an O.Z. Gedney bushing. I enlarged an existing hole in the trunk pan and screwed this bushing in place. I will later seal the hole with silicon.
[/url]battery 34 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

[/url]battery 35 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

I welded the bonding plate to the frame rail. The two outside holes were plug welded closed and ground down smooth. The 1/0 lug has not been crimped yet. The electrical tape was wrapped around the lug and wire to make sure the two did not separate.
[/url]battery 36 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

[/url]battery 37 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

Yes, my wiring has an industrial look to it.
 

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You are clearly in your element. Is this the most fun part of the project for you?

I got my 2 gauge cable and terminals from Napa. I did the crimp & solder method.

You could have gotten away with your standard ER70S MIG wire on the stainless bolt and carbon plate. The way you did it is absolutely 100% correct, but if you’re after one little weld you can get away with it versus buying and changing out a spool of wire just for that. If you control your heat there’ll be no problems with cracking, it’s done all the time at work. It really isn’t as difficult and crack as easy as google searches make it seem.

I just remembered you ran conduit in your car. It would have bugged you. Never mind. :wink2:
 

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Discussion Starter #457
You are clearly in your element. Is this the most fun part of the project for you?

I got my 2 gauge cable and terminals from Napa. I did the crimp & solder method.

You could have gotten away with your standard ER70S MIG wire on the stainless bolt and carbon plate. The way you did it is absolutely 100% correct, but if you’re after one little weld you can get away with it versus buying and changing out a spool of wire just for that. If you control your heat there’ll be no problems with cracking, it’s done all the time at work. It really isn’t as difficult and crack as easy as google searches make it seem.

I just remembered you ran conduit in your car. It would have bugged you. Never mind. :wink2:
Do you think my bonding plate is cute?
 

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Discussion Starter #459
Cute might not be the adjective. Tidy? Slick?

How long did you stare at it admiring your work when you were done? :grin2: That is the true test. I've been known to participate in such testing from time to time.
It is cute and dainty.

You are right about not needing a stainless steel wire to weld mild steel to a stainless bolt. I wanted to buy a new tool.
 

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Discussion Starter #460
Rebuilding the Convertible Top Mechanism Part 1:

I pulled my convertible top out of the attic. I have a 1969 Fisher Body Service Manual book, and an exploded diagram. The book is hard to read, and the exploded diagram lists the parts a “bolt”, “washer”, “frame”. The word selection for the parts are not very informative. I have zero knowledge how a convertible top is put together. I am confident nothing can go wrong with this part of the project.
[/url]conv top 1 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

The original owner told me it had a hole in the vinyl top. Duct tape covered the hole. The convertible top flew off when the car was transported to my house. The car looked like a trailer house after a tornado when the car arrived in Texas.

There are four bows on the assembly. Number one is the header bow. It spans the windshield when the top is closed. Number two is a rectangle tube with an insert. Number three is a round tube. Number four is a big heavy bow that the rear window is stapled onto.
[/url]conv top 2 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

The assembly has two side pieces that are cover the side windows when the top is closed. The consists of three sections that are connected to flat pieces of steel with many pivot points.

Yes, nothing can go wrong.

[/url]conv top 3 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

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