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Discussion Starter #461
Rebuilding the Convertible Top Mechanism Part 2:

I removed the “number 4” bow. This is the big heavy one at the rear of the car. A bolt, plastic bushing and a wavy washer hold the bow to the side frame. The photo below shows the order and orientation of the bushing and washer. There is a driver and passenger side. When I reinstalled it, put it on backwards and the top would not fold up properly. A little mistake but I still believe nothing can go wrong.

[/url]conv top 21 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

Inside the bow has a rubber insert that is called a tack strip. The convertible top is stapled to the rubber.
[/url]conv top 22a by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

The “number 3” bow is a round tube. It has screws that are used to hold down the side pads. Someone stripped out a screw and used a rivet to fasten the side pad. Another screw was welded to the frame.

[/url]conv top 23 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

[/url]conv top 24 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]
[/url]conv top 25 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

There is a little wire and a clamp that is bolted to this bow. It slips into the vinyl and is bolted to the front of the frame next to the header bow. The little wire keeps the convertible top from flapping in the wind.

[/url]conv top 26 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

The “number 2” bow is next to the header bow. It is flat. There are two short pieces of tack strips on the ends. They are used to fasten the side pads.

[/url]conv top 27 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

[/url]conv top 28 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

[/url]conv top 29 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

Two Phillips head screws on each side fasten this bow to the frame. Between the bow and the frame are some rectangular pieces of rubber.

[/url]conv top 30 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

[/url]conv top 31 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

[/url]conv top 32 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

The center of this bow has a rectangular metal insert. The vinyl goes between the bow and the metal insert. The insert is held in place with Phillips head screws. Sure, nothing can go wrong.
[/url]conv top 33 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

[/url]conv top 34a by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

Under the side pads are some hidden screws that fasten the latches and header bow to the frame.
[/url]conv top 35 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

The wind flapping wire has a little spring on this end. The photo below shows how it is fastened with a Phillips head screw.
[/url]conv top 36 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

The header bow has a lot of adjustment tolerances. Look how long the slots are for the two fasteners.

[/url]conv top 37 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

For the longest time, I could not figure out what this screw’s function. It fastens the rubber weather stripping for the side window. There are also two triangle shaped bumpers that screws to the header bow.
[/url]conv top 38 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]
 

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Discussion Starter #462
Rebuilding the Convertible Top Mechanism Part 3:

The side window weather stripping is screwed to the frame with special wide head self tapping screws. Note the fabric top also uses the screws.
[/url]conv top 39 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

The weather stripping is old and dry rotted. I took photos of it before they were removed. I marked them with a white marking pen to show where they were fastened.

[/url]conv top 40 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

[/url]conv top 41 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

[/url]conv top 42 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

[/url]conv top 43 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

Here is another triangle bumper on the side frame.

[/url]conv top 44 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

There is a cone shaped rubber bumper on the rear of the frame. The one in the photo below is torn.
[/url]conv top 45 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

[/url]conv top 46 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

[/url]conv top 47 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

[/url]conv top 48a by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]
 

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Hi Patrick! I read your posts all the time, so at least 6 people follow this :D The triangle "bumper" looks more like a coat hook to me :)

Now that you are on to the top frame, this build just got really interesting to me! Let me know if you need to keep your sanity about this frame. I have one power frame installed and working, and 3 extra frames in basement.

I will tell you this, you need to have all windows installed in car as well as the chrome windshield header installed. The reason for this is all frame alignments are based on the windshield surrounds. And top frame W/S needs to be on so you know when side frame are at the correct height to seal top of window, but you can still open and close door with glass up.

You adjust the door window to line up with A-pillar weatherstrip, the rear window get aligned to door window, THEN, top frame is aligned to both windows. Since you need the header installed to install the side W/S, etc. You need to start there.

Good Luck! And you will do fine, what can go wrong?
 

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Discussion Starter #464
Mr. Kevin, thanks for the reply. I need all the advice I can get.

Rebuilding the Convertible Top Mechanism Part 4:

One of the screw’s head was welded to the round bow number three. It was welded because the hole was stripped out. The round tube is thin so a Heli coil or rivet nut would not work. I ran a bead of weld around the hole in the tube to build up the stripped metal. I drilled and taped out the weld.
[/url]conv top 49 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

[/url]conv top 50 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

[/url]conv top 51 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

Whoever replaced the top in the past, must have lost one of the screws. They put a rivet in the round tube. I drilled it out and removed the rivet with a chisel.
[/url]conv top 52 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

Another pivot point was broken. The pivot point has a rivet. This particular style of rivet has a flat washer on the expanded end.
[/url]conv top 53 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]


This riveted pivot point had a plastic sleeve bearing. The plastic bearing caused the steel to wear. The round steel hole is now elliptical. The plastic bearing was frozen on the rivet shaft because of rust. There was another pivot point above this rivet joint that was also frozen. The combination of the two frozen pivot points caused the steel hole to wear into an oval shape. This is the reason why plastic bearings are junk. They are actually harder than the steel that surrounds them. The steel wears while the plastic does not wear. Bronze bearings are sacrificial, they wear thin before the steel. It is easier to replace a $2.00 bronze bearing rather than a steel part that pivots on the plastic bearing.

The photo below shows the oval shaped hole and the rusty rivet.

[/url]conv top 54 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

The steel part cannot be purchased so I rebuilt the hole with weld. I welded the edges that were elongated.
[/url]conv top 55 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

[/url]conv top 56 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

The hole is no longer oval shaped, but it is definitely not round. A hand drill would wander off the hole to the softer metal. I need a drill press. I used my die grinder to start to make the hole round again. After the hole has sort of round, I used a hand drill to make the hole the right size.
[/url]conv top 57 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

[/url]conv top 58 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

I replaced the plastic bearing with a bronze one. I put a new washer on the rivet and spread the end with a big hammer and chisel punch.
[/url]conv top 59 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

[/url]conv top 60 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

The pivot point that was frozen above this one has a non-serviceable rivet. I could not move the joint with a wrench. It has a plastic bearing. I sprayed some PB Blaster in the joint. It started to move a little. I soaked the joint in some Evapo Rust overnight and half a day. The joint can now be turned by hand. I think the rivet was rusty and had seized itself to the plastic bearing like the one I repaired the hole with weld.
 

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Discussion Starter #465
Rebuilding the Convertible Top Mechanism Part 5:

The side mechanism pivot points have plastic or bronze bearings. To my knowledge, there are no replacements for the bearings. They are not standard sizes. Below are the dimensions of the five-different flange and sleeve bearings in the convertible top assembly.
[/url]conv top 61 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

I could not find a standard bearing that was close to being correct. I contacted a company and they wanted $19.00 to make a custom bearing. Minimum order was ten. The cost was over $200.00 with shipping. There are no standard bearings that have a 1.1-inch flange and a 3/8” hole. I ordered a standard bearing with a smaller flange and a sleeve bearing with a thrust washer to see if I could make something work.

I ordered a bunch of bronze bearings that were standard sizes. I plan to replace the plastic bearings with bronze ones. The list below shows the ones that I ordered. The bearings are close to the correct size. The only dimension that is off is the outside diameter or the thickness of the barrel part. The quantities are not correct on the list.

[/url]conv top 62 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

The photo below shows what I call the short plastic bearing. This is the only plastic bearing that can be purchased. I found them in the Ames Performance catalog. The part number is FH352B. This bearing fits one pivot point that has a threaded bolt and nut. It also fit the hydraulic cylinder, but they would have to be ground down so the overall length is shorter.

Next to the short plastic bearing is a standard bronze bearing that I ordered. The flange diameter and flange thickness are the same as the plastic one. The inside diameter is the same. The outside diameter of the bronze bearing is too big.

[/url]conv top 63 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

I need to turn down the bushing. I mounted two bronze bushings on a 3/8” bolt, two flat washers and a nut. I inserted the bolt in my drill motor.
[/url]conv top 64 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

I clamped the drill in my vise. I made the motor run continuously by wrapping a wire tie around the trigger. With the bearings spinning, I used a flap disk to rapidly remove the bronze. After I was almost to the correct outside diameter, I used a file.

[/url]conv top 65 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]


[/url]conv top 66 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

The original bearings metal was rough from being machined at the factory. The bearings were smoother after using a file.

[/url]conv top 67 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

[/url]conv top 68 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

The convertible top has what I call the plastic long bearings. Many of these had the flange part sheared off the bushing. I turned down some bronze bearings to replace them.

[/url]conv top 69 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

[/url]conv top 70 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

The convertible top side mechanism has some bronze bearings. The largest one was worn thin and was cracked. The mechanism was rocking back and forth at this pivot point.
[/url]conv top 71 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

[/url]conv top 72 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

I bought an assortment of parts to try to recreate the largest bearing.

I tried to fasten the thrust washer on the sleeve bearing by heating and melting the two together with an oxygen/acetylene torch. That did not work. The oil impregnated bearing began to spit and hiss when the oil got hot. I ended up with a big mess that I threw away.

[/url]conv top 73a by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

The standard bearing is correct except the flange diameter is too small and the outside diameter is too large. I turned down the outside diameter. I bought a large plastic washer and drilled out the center of the washer. The washer is the same thickness as the bearing flange.

[/url]conv top 74a by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

I installed the bronze bearing without the plastic washer on the convertible top. The new smaller flange on the bearing completely supports one of the steel arms. The lower steel arm in the photo is the same size as small flange bearing. The upper arm is the side that takes advantage of the larger flange.

[/url]conv top 75 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

The photo below shows the new bearing installed with the plastic washer. The bronze bearing can be seen supporting what is now the upper arm.

[/url]conv top 76 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]


[/url]conv top 77 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

You might have noticed the parts look less rusty. I sandblasted and applied epoxy primer to the frame. I top coated it with black paint.
 

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Discussion Starter #466
Rebuilding the Convertible Top Mechanism Part 6:

I sandblasted and painted only one side mechanism. I used the other side as an example how to reassemble the newly painted side. I must have taken fifty photos of the convertible top. The photos are nice, but it would have been very difficult to reassemble the sides back together without an unmolested example. The pivot bolts have to be inserted in a certain direction. The bearing flanges cannot be installed backwards. Finally, there are wavy washers that go in certain locations on the pivot points. Photographs cannot show the details.

[/url]conv top 78 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

This is a close-up photo of the long plastic bearing that was replaced with a bronze bearing. The bearing flange will only fit in one direction. There are wavy washers between the steel bars. I had to loosen the unmolested example bolt to see the correct order bolt, bearing, washer, etc. order. I applied grease to the bearing and bolt before I installed them.

[/url]conv top 79 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]


[/url]conv top 80 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

The photo below shows on the short plastic bearing replaced with a bronze bearing. The space between the bronze bearing and the steel bar has one of those wavy washers.

[/url]conv top 81 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

The next photo shows another pivot point. This one that had a bronze sleeve bearing. I replaced the bearing although the old one was not worn. There is a set screw to lock the bolt in place.

[/url]conv top 82 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

Some of the old bronze bearings cannot be replaced. They are held in place with rivets. I would have to cut some welds to be able to get to bearings.

[/url]conv top 83 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]
 

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Rebuilding the Convertible Top Mechanism Part 6:

I sandblasted and painted only one side mechanism. I used the other side as an example how to reassemble the newly painted side. I must have taken fifty photos of the convertible top. The photos are nice, but it would have been very difficult to reassemble the sides back together without an unmolested example. The pivot bolts have to be inserted in a certain direction. The bearing flanges cannot be installed backwards. Finally, there are wavy washers that go in certain locations on the pivot points. Photographs cannot show the details.

[/url]conv top 78 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

This is a close-up photo of the long plastic bearing that was replaced with a bronze bearing. The bearing flange will only fit in one direction. There are wavy washers between the steel bars. I had to loosen the unmolested example bolt to see the correct order bolt, bearing, washer, etc. order. I applied grease to the bearing and bolt before I installed them.

[/url]conv top 79 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]


[/url]conv top 80 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

The photo below shows on the short plastic bearing replaced with a bronze bearing. The space between the bronze bearing and the steel bar has one of those wavy washers.

[/url]conv top 81 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

The next photo shows another pivot point. This one that had a bronze sleeve bearing. I replaced the bearing although the old one was not worn. There is a set screw to lock the bolt in place.

[/url]conv top 82 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

Some of the old bronze bearings cannot be replaced. They are held in place with rivets. I would have to cut some welds to be able to get to bearings.

[/url]conv top 83 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]
Are you going to install your own convertible top Patrick? If yes I am looking forward to following along in your thread. Should be awesome. :smile2:

Don
 

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Are you going to install your own convertible top Patrick? If yes I am looking forward to following along in your thread. Should be awesome. :smile2:

Don
And with 500 pictures. :grin2:

Patrick, you said I blew by you. It occurs to me that I did not have 200 hours of convertible top repair to do.
 

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Discussion Starter #469
And with 500 pictures. :grin2:

Patrick, you said I blew by you. It occurs to me that I did not have 200 hours of convertible top repair to do.
You spent a lot of time on the metal roof that did not fit.

When I don't know what I am doing, I walk around in circles and take a lot of photos. I have yet to take a photo of me tightening lug nuts. I think I got that down pat.

I visited a convertible top installation shop looking for those plastic bearings. They never heard of anybody replacing them. I asked them how would it cost to replace the top. They told me $1400.00. A new top costs in the $300-400 range. I could completely destroy the first top attempting to install it and still buy another one for less than $1400.00.
 

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Discussion Starter #470
Rebuilding the Convertible Top Mechanism Part 6: (Modifying Convertible top for Mini Tub car)

I installed mini tubs on my convertible. The wider inner wheelhouse allowed me to put fat tires under the car. It also interferes with the operation on the folding convertible top mechanism. One of the arms on the convertible top hits the top of the wider inner wheelhouse before the mechanism completely folds down.

The first photo below shows the convertible top arm disconnected from the frame of the car. The arm is hitting the inner wheelhouse preventing it from dropping down far enough to be bolted to the car. If it is connected, the top does not fold all the way down.

[/url]conv top 84 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

[/url]conv top 85 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

These are the options that I came up with:
1. Ignore the problem. It won’t be the end of the world if the top sticks up more than it should.
2. Beat the inner fender with a hammer. Make a large enough dent so the arm clears the fender. Apparently, the factory flattened where the inner and outer wheelhouses joint to prevent the convertible top from rubbing on sharp metal.
3. Cut a notch in the inner fender and weld new metal to form a pocket for the arm.
4. Reshape the arm.

I thought that reshaping the arm would look the best.
One end of the arm is bolted to a square bolt and serrated aluminum bushing. The other end is riveted to the convertible frame. I drilled out the rivet to separate the arm from the convertible top.

[/url]conv top 86 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

I took the arm to my bench and traced an outline of it on some poster board. The two pieces of masking tape show where it was hitting the inner fender. I plan to cut the arm and add metal to it. This will reshape the arm.

[/url]conv top 87 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

The arm is not flat. It is bent where it hits the inner fender. I would be easier if I cut it in an area where it is flat.
[/url]conv top 88 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

I decided to cut the arm where it makes an arc. This part of the arm is flat. I cut out a cardboard template of the arm.

[/url]conv top 89 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

I taped the template to the car to see if where I selected to cut the arm would cause any problems. It looks like the arm will still work where I selected to make the cut.

[/url]conv top 90 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

[/url]conv top 91 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

I cut the arm. I beveled the cut to get good penetration for the weld. The arm is 3/8” thick. There must be large forces present on the arm for GM to use a bar of steel that big.
[/url]conv top 92 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

I am going to replace the rivet I drilled out with a bolt and jam nut. I am going to copy some of the other pivot points on the convertible top that use a bolt. The 3/8” bolt that I selected shoulder length was too long. I tapped the bolt to add more threads to the bolt. The shoulder should only fit inside the bronze bearing. I rounded the hex head and cut a slot in the bolt to make it look like the other bolts on the convertible top.
[/url]conv top 93 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

I tapped the convertible top mechanism where I drilled out the rivet. The 3/8-16 bolt will be threaded into this point and a jam nut will be installed on the backside.

[/url]conv top 94 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

I reinstalled the cut arm back on the car. I placed a piece of poster board behind the arm. I traced an outline of the cut arm. The bolt to the left in the photo below was the one I turned. It was once a hex head bolt. I cut a slot in it to fit a screwdriver.

[/url]conv top 95 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

I removed the arm and lined it up on the piece of paper that I traced the outline. The red lines are the shape of the patch that needs to be added to the arm.
[/url]conv top 96 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

I placed the arm on top of the poster board. I placed the arm’s pivot points directly over the poster board pivot point circles. The distance and position of the pivot points cannot change. This is the reason why I drew an outline of the arm on a poster board. If the pivot points are different from the original design, the convertible top geometry will be messed up. I don’t like messed up geometry and neither does the car. I cut a piece of metal to fill in the gap.

[/url]conv top 97 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

[/url]conv top 98 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

[/url]conv top 99 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

I clamped the arm to the table, so the pivot points don’t move when I welded in the patch.

[/url]conv top 100 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]
 

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Discussion Starter #471
Rebuilding the Convertible Top Mechanism Part 7: (Modifying Convertible top for Mini Tub car)

I installed the arm back on the car. I folded and opened the top to see if it would bind. The operation was smooth.

[/url]conv top 101 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

[/url]conv top 102 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

The photos below show the driver side that was modified. It now sits low inside the car. The passenger side has not been modified. It still sits high.

[/url]conv top 103a by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

[/url]conv top 104a by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

I cut the passenger side arm the same way. The patch was exactly the same size as the driver side.

[/url]conv top 105 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

[/url]conv top 106 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

[/url]conv top 107 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

Closeup view of the modified arms.

[/url]conv top 108 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

[/url]conv top 109 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

Convertible top arms painted and closeup view of drilled and tapped new bolt with jamb nut.

[/url]conv top 110 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

[/url]conv top 111 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

[/url]conv top 112 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]
 
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Discussion Starter #472
Rebuilding the Convertible Top Mechanism Part 8: (Installing Convertible Tack Strips)

There are two different sizes of tack strips that are needed to repair the convertible top. The first size is ½”x 5/16”. The other size is 3/16” x 5/8”. I called two different very large parts houses looking for them. It was funny, the two guys that answered the phone told me they did not sell this part. I found out later they really do sell them. I posted a question in the convertible section and Mr. Don (dhutton) responded that the part is sold on Ebay. I should have known; everything is sold on Ebay. Thanks for pointing me in the right direction Mr. Don.

[/url]conv top 113 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

The number 4 bow is the one that the tack strip secures the plastic window. I used less than ten feet of the ½ x 5/16” strip. The number four bow requires two strips to fit in the slot. The original tack strip is a different size and it was stapled to the bow. The staples were inside the bow’s slot and it would be very difficult to reuse or install staples like the original. I think replacement convertible top installers use self-tapping screws that are screwed through the top of the tack strip. I did not think the screws would hold the two tack strips that were sandwiched in the slot. The screws would be between the two tack strips. The head of the screws will interfere with the staples that will be installed later.

I went a different route. I drilled holes in the side of the bow that no one can see after the top is installed. I beveled the holes so the screws will sit flush.
[/url]conv top 114 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]


[/url]conv top 115 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

I installed the tack strips in the slot using 3M weather strip glue. I squirted glue in the screw holes and screwed the bolts into the side of the bow and tack strips.
[/url]conv top 116 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

[/url]conv top 117 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

Moving forward to the number two bow, it has two short sections of the ½” x 5/16 tack strip. The ends of the bow require about an 8.5” piece on each end. The center metal insert overlays part of tack strip. Two holes are drilled in the tack strip so the bow’s mounting bolts can protrude through the rubber.
[/url]conv top 118 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

[/url]conv top 119 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]
 

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Discussion Starter #473
Rebuilding the Convertible Top Mechanism Part 9: (Installing Convertible Header Bow)

The number one bow, or the header bow, was rusty and I bought a new one. It has three tack strips. There is one long one along the bottom. There are two short pieces on the top. All the pieces are 3/16” x5/8”.

The bottom piece is about 5 feet long. It is held down with mounting tabs. I applied the glue to the header bow and to the tack strip.

264101

I started to bend a few tabs down to make sure it was in the correct position. Then I bent all of them down.

264102



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The top side of the header bow was two short strips on the ends. I think someone replaced the header bow tack strips in the past. The old header had four screw drilled on each side to hold the strip down. I drilled new holes in my reproduction header bow to copy what was done before. I screwed and glued the strips to the header.
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The old header had duct tape on the top ends of the header. The tape covered the top tack strips and the top edges. I don’t know why it was put there. Someone before me put it there for a reason. He was a lot smarter than me, so I put some duct tape on my new header to copy what was done before.

Picture 129

The header as a round piece of bow edging. The old one was junk. I bought a new one. The new one was made of plastic with metal clips embedded in the plastic. The old one might have been made of cloth. I applied glue to the top of the header and inside the new edging. I installed the edging with a rubber hammer.
[/url]conv top 130 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

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[/url]conv top 132 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

The top of the header bow has a thick felt pad glued to it. I reused the old pad. I glued it down with 3M Yellow Trim Adhesive.
[/url]conv top 133 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]


[/url]conv top 134 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]

I had to add new hook latches to the new header bow. The spring broke.
[/url]conv top 135 by Patrick Smith, on Flickr[/IMG]
 

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Discussion Starter #474
Can anyone see the photos in this build thread?
 

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Discussion Starter #476
I am seeing the same thing as you. Mr. Edmontvillage uses Flicker and his links display photos on his build thread. Maybe it is a Firebird thing. :) Thanks for responding.
 

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Tim - The Northwest 1969 Camaro
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It's almost like the link is the post rather than the photo. With the new site you can post almost any way you want and the pic will show up. Bummer to not have the history there though. It was a lot of work to post all those photos with explanations and detail. I have enjoyed reading your thread.
 

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Discussion Starter #479
Patrick, I have tried a few edits to get your photos showing, but nothing I tried worked. Lloyds pics look like they were posted differently then yours. I will keep looking for a fix. K
Thank you for trying. I sent a post to that new Cricket person. He said he will look into it but that was a week ago. I think he blew me off.
 

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Discussion Starter #480
It's almost like the link is the post rather than the photo. With the new site you can post almost any way you want and the pic will show up. Bummer to not have the history there though. It was a lot of work to post all those photos with explanations and detail. I have enjoyed reading your thread.
This is my second attempt to make a build thread. 1969 Firebird Convertible was the old one. The photos were corrupted by Photobucket. I asked if I could edit the build thread a fix the photos, but the administrators told me no. So I made this new thread, 1969 Firebird Convertible with photos. You know it takes a lot of work to create a build thread. I don't think I will post anything new. It is not worth the trouble.
 
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