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Discussion Starter #1
I spent a lot of time over the past few days going through all (most?) of the oil posts regarding zinc.
I ended up buying a case of Brad Penn 10W-30 oil that should be here tomorrow.

Assuming I get far enough along to actually start this newly built engine in the next couple of weeks, what do I need to do to break it in properly.

I've read/heard two different schools of though on this:
1) Run the engine for a minimum of 20mins at a minimum of 2500rpm
and
2) Constantly run the motor at varying speeds, preferrably driving on back roads for 30mins or so, the idea being that you don't want it to run at the same RPM for an extended time.

Obviously at odds with each other.

The engine will likely be ready to start before the car is "driveable", so should I wait and do #2, or can I start it up in the garage and break it in without being on the road quite yet.

Jim
 

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I spent a lot of time over the past few days going through all (most?) of the oil posts regarding zinc.
I ended up buying a case of Brad Penn 10W-30 oil that should be here tomorrow.

Assuming I get far enough along to actually start this newly built engine in the next couple of weeks, what do I need to do to break it in properly.

I've read/heard two different schools of though on this:
1) Run the engine for a minimum of 20mins at a minimum of 2500rpm
and
2) Constantly run the motor at varying speeds, preferrably driving on back roads for 30mins or so, the idea being that you don't want it to run at the same RPM for an extended time.

Obviously at odds with each other.

The engine will likely be ready to start before the car is "driveable", so should I wait and do #2, or can I start it up in the garage and break it in without being on the road quite yet.

Jim
Here is the breakin procedure from Crane Cams :

http://www.cranecams.com/uploads/breakin/548e.pdf
 

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I have done about 8 motors in recent times and have always used the same oil you bought. I have done it the same way each time 20 min at 2500 rpm.

Be sure to prime the oil pump first.
 

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Check with the company that you got the cam from for THEIR instructions.

I am from the "vary the RPMs" school - which is very similar to what Crane says to do in that link above.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Check with the company that you got the cam from for THEIR instructions.

I am from the "vary the RPMs" school - which is very similar to what Crane says to do in that link above.
It's a Crane...and I went through their break in instructions. They say to go straight to 3,000rpm, get it running smooth, and then vary it from 3,000 down to 1,500, and back to 3,000 for 20-30mins.

My neighbors are going to LOVE that ;)

Jim
 

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From 7. in the break in instruction from Crane above, these are what it says...

Start the engine and immediately bring to 3,000 rpm. Timing should be adjusted, as closely as possible, to reduce excessive heat or load during break-in. Get the engine running fairly smoothly and vary the engine speed from 1500-3000 RPM in a slow, to moderate, acceleration/deceleration cycle.

During this time, be sure to check for any leaks and check out any unusual noises. If something doesn’t sound right, shut the engine off and check out the source of the noise.

Upon restart, resume the high idle speed cycling. Continue the varying “break-in” speed for 20 - 30 minutes. This is necessary to provide proper lifter rotation to properly mate each lifter to its lobe.

The important thing is to vary the RPMs in a slow to moderate cycle.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Use Joe Gibbs BR oil for your breakin. They also sell BR30 breakin oil.
I bought this specifically for the zinc content:

Brad Penn 009-7150-12PK 10W-30 Partial Synthetic Racing Oil - 1 Quart Bottle, (Case of 12)

Only concern is that it's "partial synthetic"...

***edit***
Went back and found Brad Penn Break In oil...straight 30W, so bought 4 quarts of that. Will used the 10W-30 after it's been on the road for awhile.

Jim
 

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making sure the engine fires right up helps alot too! grinding away over and over wipes off cam and lifter lube!! a little too much timing is better then not enough (red headers, and gets hot)! also be prepared, have a plug in fan ready, enough fuel, timing light hooked up, a few helpers to watch for leaks. give one person the job to watch oil pressure gauge and instruct them to shut off motor is oil pressure drops for some reason. if for some reason it needs to be shut off, this is not bad. just dont let it idle. on restart let it come up in rpms right way again.... hope this helps make it smoother for you!
 

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Discussion Starter #14

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I have always covered the cam lobes and lifters with Molycote assembly paste and used a break-in oil when available. I also use a big blower that blows air into the radiator to simulate highway speed air and do the break in sitting in the driveway.

Back before I knew about the molycote we would use STP oil treatment and coat the cam & lifters with that. Cannot remember ever having a problem doing it this way either. We did use a drill attachment to prime the oil pump and get lube up to the top end a bit as well.
 

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Are the springs from Crane as well? Are they matched to the camshaft?
Hydraulic or solid?

Depending on how strong those springs are, you MAY need to break it in with the OUTERS ONLY installed. I am not saying every aftermarket spring requires it. I have no idea which springs you have.

Check the spec sheet for seat pressure. Check with the manufacturer to see what it recommends.
 

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I have always covered the cam lobes and lifters with Molycote assembly paste and used a break-in oil when available. I also use a big blower that blows air into the radiator to simulate highway speed air and do the break in sitting in the driveway.

Back before I knew about the molycote we would use STP oil treatment and coat the cam & lifters with that. Cannot remember ever having a problem doing it this way either. We did use a drill attachment to prime the oil pump and get lube up to the top end a bit as well.
The molycote is good but have you ever pulled the pan after a break in job? This stuff is heavy and it just wants to stay in the bottom of the pan. Not sure what long term effect is.
 

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Well boys here is my take on this .In the old days I would use a new filter coat the lobes and lifter bottoms with Isky REV_LUBE 5qts of 10 w40 se/sf oil and a can of G/M EOS fire it up and 2000 to 2500 for at least 20 minutes or better then change the oil and filter. NEVER HAD A PROBLEM .Chris Straub bought up an interesting premise over load the crank case with 10 qts of oil. I would think that oil in that amount would blow out oil all over the place but maybe not. I certainly am not contesting his knowledge but wish he would explain the reasons why the oil would not go everywhere in that amount and RPM . If you go over to team chevelle 540 RAT says that the Brad Penn is not great oil because of poor film strength yet it has plenty of zddp and Isky and others recommend it for breakin and afterwards here is a man who is a member of the SAE and holds patents and is a BOEING engineer to boot, impressive credentials to say the least. He states that you do not need oils high in zddp for F/T cams to survive but oils high in film strength. Yet all the cam companies say that you need the zddp for their F/T cams I have had conversations with ISKY ENGLE HOWARDS and they say you need it or motor oil specially formulated for F/T cams with enough zddp in it already .Alex
 

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Little story for you. This was over 30 years ago...

One of the first engines I rebuilt mostly by myself (had to have a friend grind the valves for me - but that was it) lasted a lot longer than it should have.

327 with a 327/350 hp cam. I cut out the ring groove, put in new rings and bearings, gaskets, freeze plugs, etc. Break in prep was getting timing close, fluid levels all correct, oil system primed.

Fired it up, checked for leaks. No leaks, so DROVE IT for about 30 minutes. Going up and down in RPMs, on and of the brake - keeping rpms up. Never over 4000 RPMs, but never under 1500. Did this on back roads.

Drove that truck for 5 years. Sold it to my uncle who drove it daily for 7-8 years to work - and everywhere else. Then my cousin took the engine out, put 2.02 heads on it and raced it in a dirt track car for 3 seasons before it finally gave out. Threw a rod.
 

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Yes Byron I agree but 30 years ago all the oils had enough zddp . you don't think for one minute that G/M FORD and Mopar broke in each and every cam on a new car back then do you, they didn't and no problems . I believe this is because back then everything was USA made good metal good Parkerizing and good oil plus everything was flat tappet for the most part . Alex
 
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