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I am going to swap out a factory 4 piston caliper set up on my 68 camaro and move to a single piston caliper like the 69 models, Please don't judge, and I simply need an answer. I need to know if the 67 and 68 caliper brackets are the same as the 69 caliper bracket, and if not where can i find just the 69 caliper bracket? Thanks for your time and help guys!
 

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You would have to look up the original steering knuckle (what many call a spindle) to compare the part numbers. If the numbers are different then the parts differ from each other. Since the four piston fixed bridge Girling calipers were fitted to the Corvette (same steering knuckle as used on the full size car) I doubt if the GM designed floating single piston caliper will just bolt up.

Big Dave
 

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You hardly hear of a single piston caliper failure. I would not hesitate on the swap. The brackets are at all the major suppliers, and eBay.
 

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Not judging. The brackets are not the same.

Hard to find originals. Repops are available here: https://www.ebay.com/itm/NEW-Disc-B...vrolet&hash=item3ae6f2792a:g:5k4AAOSw1~JZOtLI

I have never used the repops, so can't speak to quality.

I do not know if the spindles are the same, but suspect so. Someone on here may know for sure. I know the drum brake spindles are interchangeable from 68 to 69. Don't know about the disc brake spindles.

As has been mentioned, the 4 piston set up is superior in performance.... but, for a street car, you will never push it enough to know the difference. The single piston design is much less likely to fail because of corrosion, and will take a rebuild without sleeving.
 

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You need to get 1969 caliper brackets, single piston calipers, and 69 rotors. Your old rotors may work. You can use one-piece rotors, you don't need the two piece.
I'm not sure how the hoses will swap over. 69 used a long hose that had a bolt on support to a hole in the upper A arm. 69 brake hose anchor point was on top of the frame rail, not on the side.

Be sure to get the upper caliper bracket mounting bolts.
I don't see any difference between 67/8 disc spindles & 69 disc spindles.
 

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I'm having to guess but I would think he wold prefer the full floating single because it "looks" original (numbers matching thing vs. performance).

According to my 35th edition Hollander interchange manual (printed 1969) the disc brake steering knuckle for the 1967 and '68 Camaro has an interchange number of 556; the 1969 has a disc brake steering knuckle interchange number of 575. Different number means that you can bolt it onto the car but none of the other parts (disc rotor and hat, or caliper will fit the other). So you have to buy everything off a donor vehicle; or use an adapter, which isn't numbers matching.

I am pretty sure that some one with a single piston that wanted to step up to the Corvette style brakes to go road racing would swap out a stock steering knuckle with a floating single piston for yours (just be sure he doesn't have a drum brake steering knuckle interchange number 574, for your 556 steering knuckle).

The Girling brakes are superior in clamping ability compared to the single piston (because the load is spread out evenly across the pad on both sides of the rotor due to four pistons. It is why NASCAR now uses six piston calipers and why newer Camaros went from a single piston to two pistons with PBR calipers in 1982, and back to four pistons with Brembo brakes in 2010.

Big Dave
 

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I'm having to guess but I would think he wold prefer the full floating single because it "looks" original (numbers matching thing vs. performance).

According to my 35th edition Hollander interchange manual (printed 1969) the disc brake steering knuckle for the 1967 and '68 Camaro has an interchange number of 556; the 1969 has a disc brake steering knuckle interchange number of 575. Different number means that you can bolt it onto the car but none of the other parts (disc rotor and hat, or caliper will fit the other). So you have to buy everything off a donor vehicle; or use an adapter, which isn't numbers matching.

I am pretty sure that some one with a single piston that wanted to step up to the Corvette style brakes to go road racing would swap out a stock steering knuckle with a floating single piston for yours (just be sure he doesn't have a drum brake steering knuckle interchange number 574, for your 556 steering knuckle).

The Girling brakes are superior in clamping ability compared to the single piston (because the load is spread out evenly across the pad on both sides of the rotor due to four pistons. It is why NASCAR now uses six piston calipers and why newer Camaros went from a single piston to two pistons with PBR calipers in 1982, and back to four pistons with Brembo brakes in 2010.

Big Dave
Dave, much of what you wrote is the reason for asking what prompted the change.
 

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The cost of rebuilding the early 4-piston (corroded?) calipers might be a valid reason to 'switch' to the '69 single piston caliper which are basically trouble free and cheap/easy to rebuild. But.. that said, I'd keep the car original myself, and send my calipers off to get SS sleeved/rebuilt which is a significant one time cost but should greatly minimize future costs...
 
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