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Still trying to finish this project I picked up and the rear brakes are still a headache. I took off the CPP disc conversion the prior owner had on the car, in favor of a Wilwood setup front/rear. The issue I'm having is on the rear. The car has a narrowed 12 bolt and now the new caliper bracket is hitting the lower shock mount. It's quite a bit of overlap. I tried to swing the caliper around to the front of the axle, but the condition is the same. Any thoughts or suggestions?
 

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Swap the two caliper brackets from side to side relocating the calipers to the opposite side of the shock mount. The drivers side caliper should be in front of the axle and the passenger's side should point toward the back of the car.


Update: I see you may have already tried this. Sounds like your shortened axle may be the cause.
 

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Looks like you have two options:

Four link with coil over shocks, or moving your standard shocks in board with a fabricated upper shock mount on a new frame cross-member.

One option that has no sex appeal but works very well is to swap out the rear disc brake with an over sized drum brake. Several vendors sell the eleven inch drum off of a B-body (Impala, Caprice). It bolts up in place of a stock nine inch drum brake, but the added mass and surface area will perform on a street strip car as well a disc brakes will. Only if you plan on road racing it would you need a disc brake.

Big Dave
 

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Brett - Leander, Texas 1969 SS396
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When I bought my 69 SS396, the previous owner had taken the lower shock mounts and swapped sides with them i.e. Taken the passenger mount and bolted it to the drivers side & visa-versa. What this did was move the shock to the inboard side of the leaf spring. A mount needed to be fabricated/installed, but it moved the shock away from the brake for sure....

Brett....
 

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When I bought my 69 SS396, the previous owner had taken the lower shock mounts and swapped sides with them i.e. Taken the passenger mount and bolted it to the drivers side & visa-versa. What this did was move the shock to the inboard side of the leaf spring. A mount needed to be fabricated/installed, but it moved the shock away from the brake for sure....

Brett....
Also lengthens the shock travel and puts it at a compound angle. A 2"x2" thin wall tube welded between the "frame rails" (also made of thin wall tubing) could have a shock mount fabricated to weld on to that new cross-member. If you just move the shock inboard and bore a hole in the trunk pan for it to bolt to it will push through the sheet metal of the trunk pan in short order. DSE makes a kit to move the springs inboard, and mount the shocks to the inside of the leaf springs that is combined with a mini tub kit to mount big tires.

You can make all of this yourself out of flat stock and some non-structural (decorative) tubing if you know how to weld and still own a welder. If you go to thick wall structural tubing the frame rails that are just formed 16 gage steel won't like the heat required to burn them together (it can be done by an experienced welder, just not me).

Big Dave
 

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Brett - Leander, Texas 1969 SS396
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Also lengthens the shock travel and puts it at a compound angle. A 2"x2" thin wall tube welded between the "frame rails" (also made of thin wall tubing) could have a shock mount fabricated to weld on to that new cross-member. If you just move the shock inboard and bore a hole in the trunk pan for it to bolt to it will push through the sheet metal of the trunk pan in short order. DSE makes a kit to move the springs inboard, and mount the shocks to the inside of the leaf springs that is combined with a mini tub kit to mount big tires.

You can make all of this yourself out of flat stock and some non-structural (decorative) tubing if you know how to weld and still own a welder. If you go to thick wall structural tubing the frame rails that are just formed 16 gage steel won't like the heat required to burn them together (it can be done by an experienced welder, just not me).

Big Dave
Yes, Big Dave. Whoever moved my shock mounts did not adequately reinforce the area up top and when I got my car and started looking at it more closely, the shocks were not even secured. They had pushed through the sheetmetal up top! I swapped the shock mounts back and mounted the shocks correctly.

Brett.....
 
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