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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a complete 1971 nova a/c setup. This will fit a 69 camaro I believe. Anyone know it's worth? I don't care for air in my cars. I believe everything works except the compressor. Other than the compressor, everything else is in excellant shape.
 

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Consider that in 1971, the refrigerant was R-12. Today's cost for R-12 is about $60 per pound IF you can find it. The compressor won't be a problem to find at most any recycler but make sure you select one with the same coolant capacity.
I've heard of guys just evacuating a R-12 system and filling it with 134A and claiming not to have any problems but DuPont says 134A has much smaller molecules and will eventuallu penetrate any and all parts of a R-12 system causing them to leak from everywhere.
 

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the other Saturday while watching "crank and chrome" on Tnn...Sam and Dave where converting a r-12 system to 134 using a kit....costs about 35 bucks....and low and behold...i saw one at wal-mart...and yes the compressor oil is different for 134 and will not last long in a r-12 system
 

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Do you have the hoses from the compressor to the evap.?
Was it for a B/B or S/B?

[This message has been edited by mobiletools (edited 12-21-2000).]
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I have a 100% complete setup. It is still in the car. I plan on taking it out. It is for a sb. The hoses appear to be in excellent shape.
 

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the fittings on a r-12 system are a different size than a 134 system....the kit i mentioned about comes with the proper adapters so u can charge the system
 

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The original question was what was it all worth.

Guesses from watching prices on Ebay seem to hover around 350 to 400 for the engine comparment components, including the evaporator housing, compressor, condenser, compressor and brackets.

Don't see many hoses showing up that often except in complete setups so you could probably sell just the hoses for a good price if they are complete and in good shape. Big block stuff is worth more than small block stuff, hoses and evaporator are different.

Inside the car ductwork seems to vary widely, I've seen the ducts without the heater box section go for as high as $200 or as low as $20 (I have a complete spare set that I got for $20, and I also bid on the set that eventually went for over $200 but didn't get it, thankfully) The heater box itself doesn't come up that often but I would think its worth somewhere in the 100 range. A/C kick panels are worth quite a bit, say $50-60 each side including the damper on the passenger side and the metal sheild behind the drivers one. Control panel seems to run in the 50 to 60 range, maybe more if it includes all of the vacuum hoses and cables. Air dams for convertibles (they attach to the cocktail shakers and keep air from going around the ends of the radiator core support) might as well be made of solid gold. You probably won't ever find a set of two. The air dam under the radiator for big blocks is also something that never comes up for sale.

A good condition A/C dash pad is also worth quite a bit of money, as the Repro ones are kind of flimsy.

Keep in mind that if you are removing an A/C system that the normal heater ductwork from a Non A/C car will not cover the hole in the firewall for the evaporator. A/C and non A/C cars have different firewall penetrations, and the A/C one is about 2" taller and 6" narrower than the non A/C holes and as a result you will end up with a 1" gap above and below a non A/C engine side duct.

Also A/C cars don't have holes through the firewall into the cowl area to connect to the upper vents at each end of the dash rendering those vents inoperable if you pull out the A/C ductwork inside the car. But you run into other problems if you leave the inner stuff in place and remove just the engine side stuff because the wiring for the blower motor resistor is in the evaporator housing in a A/C car and in the top of the inner heater box in a non A/C car. Without the evaporator in place there is noplace to put the resistor. Also an A/C system has a 4 speed fan and a non A/C fan is three speed so you can't try to cross connect an A/C fan switch to a non A/C resistor. You have to go all the way in removing the system if you wan't any kind of heater in the car, you can't take out the engine side stuff and leave the parts inside the car.



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Mark Canning
1969 Indy Pace Car
350/300HP RPO Z11
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for your help, Mark. I really appreciate it.
 
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