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Amico H4 Headlamp Relay Wire Harness Kit Review

After pricing out what it would cost to build my own headlamp relay kit and the time it would take to do so, I did a quick online search and found the “Amico Car 30A Fuse 2 H4 HID Headlight Fog Bulb Female Plug Relay Harness Wire” kit being offered by Amazon with free two day shipping for Prime members, The price was $18.56 which is less than just the materials alone would add up to if I built one myself. So I ordered the item and the following is my review of the kit and how well it installed and worked.

Amazon link: Amazon.com: Amico Car 30A Fuse 2 H4 HID Headlight Fog Bulb Female Plug Relay Harness Wire: Automotive


The kit arrived in a typical bubble wrap lined envelope with the harness wrapped in clear plastic.





The harness has two red fuse holders each with a 10-amp fuse installed and a red wire with a ring tongue connector for attaching to either the battery or some other 12-volt power source. There are two 80-amp relays for the low beam and high beam circuits, two ceramic green heat shrink covered H4 female headlamp sockets with 60 plus inches of wire between them, and one yellow plastic H4 male headlamp plug for connecting to one of the vehicles original H4 female headlamp sockets to trigger the relays. The ceramic H4 female headlamp sockets have two wires running from them to the power relays for high and low beam power but instead of a negative wire running along side, they each have a 7-inch ground wire with a ring tongue connector to attach to a good ground near each headlamp.



Installation was straight forward, I secured each of the ground cables to existing grounding points on the radiator support, connected the red power lead to the horn relay on the drivers side and then connected the H4 sockets to the two headlamps and the original H4 socket on the drivers side to trigger the relays and used some die-electric compound to prevent corrosion.

The car currently has Sylvania H6024 headlamps installed in it and before installing the relay kit, I measured the voltage drop that existed in the original wiring harness by first checking the battery voltage with the car sitting, engine not running, and no electrical loads which measured at 12.5 volts. Next I inserted a couple of temporary jumper cables into the H4 headlamp socket and connected them to my voltmeter and took a reading with the headlamps turned on and the H4 socket connected to the headlamp. The voltage at the headlamp socket while powering the headlamp was exactly 2 volts less at 10.5 volts.

The same measurement taken after the relay kit installation shows there is now only .5 volts less at the headlamp sockets indicating a 1.5 volt increase in voltage to the headlamps and due to the relays now powering the headlamps, a much lower current demand being placed on the old wiring going into the car and to the headlamp switch.

I would recommend this kit for anyone wanting to install a headlamp relay kit, it was well-manufactured, reasonably priced, easy to install and just plain works.

Scott
 

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That's a great price. I really like that it has the ceramic connectors. I don't care for the ribbed loom cover though.

I think I paid like $43.00 for the one someone suggested in another thread (from Summit Racing)...so yeah...that's a big price difference. I'm very happy with the end result...lights are certainly brighter.

 

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I'm not a fan of the ribbed loom jacket either and will be replacing it with wiring harness vinyl wrap like was originally used on these cars from the factory but I didn't want to alter the product until I installed and tested it and made sure there were no defects requiring a return/replacement.
 

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Amico H4 Headlamp Relay Wire Harness Kit Review

After pricing out what it would cost to build my own headlamp relay kit and the time it would take to do so, I did a quick online search and found the “Amico Car 30A Fuse 2 H4 HID Headlight Fog Bulb Female Plug Relay Harness Wire” kit being offered by Amazon with free two day shipping for Prime members, The price was $18.56 which is less than just the materials alone would add up to if I built one myself. So I ordered the item and the following is my review of the kit and how well it installed and worked.

Amazon link: Amazon.com: Amico Car 30A Fuse 2 H4 HID Headlight Fog Bulb Female Plug Relay Harness Wire: Automotive


The kit arrived in a typical bubble wrap lined envelope with the harness wrapped in clear plastic.





The harness has two red fuse holders each with a 10-amp fuse installed and a red wire with a ring tongue connector for attaching to either the battery or some other 12-volt power source. There are two 80-amp relays for the low beam and high beam circuits, two ceramic green heat shrink covered H4 female headlamp sockets with 60 plus inches of wire between them, and one yellow plastic H4 male headlamp plug for connecting to one of the vehicles original H4 female headlamp sockets to trigger the relays. The ceramic H4 female headlamp sockets have two wires running from them to the power relays for high and low beam power but instead of a negative wire running along side, they each have a 7-inch ground wire with a ring tongue connector to attach to a good ground near each headlamp.



Installation was straight forward, I secured each of the ground cables to existing grounding points on the radiator support, connected the red power lead to the horn relay on the drivers side and then connected the H4 sockets to the two headlamps and the original H4 socket on the drivers side to trigger the relays and used some die-electric compound to prevent corrosion.

The car currently has Sylvania H6024 headlamps installed in it and before installing the relay kit, I measured the voltage drop that existed in the original wiring harness by first checking the battery voltage with the car sitting, engine not running, and no electrical loads which measured at 12.5 volts. Next I inserted a couple of temporary jumper cables into the H4 headlamp socket and connected them to my voltmeter and took a reading with the headlamps turned on and the H4 socket connected to the headlamp. The voltage at the headlamp socket while powering the headlamp was exactly 2 volts less at 10.5 volts.

The same measurement taken after the relay kit installation shows there is now only .5 volts less at the headlamp sockets indicating a 1.5 volt increase in voltage to the headlamps and due to the relays now powering the headlamps, a much lower current demand being placed on the old wiring going into the car and to the headlamp switch.

I would recommend this kit for anyone wanting to install a headlamp relay kit, it was well-manufactured, reasonably priced, easy to install and just plain works.

Scott
Will this kit work with RS headlights also?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Will this kit work with RS headlights also?
Yes, I have a 69 Rally Sport with hidden headlights and it works fine. I located the relays on the drivers side to connect the power leads to the horn relay. I removed the wire loom covering and wrapped the harness with the correct vinyl wrap so it "looks period correct". Made a big difference in the amount of light available from the headlights with full electrical system voltage available.
 

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Reading the reviews on amazon, there were concerns about wire gauge (thick insulation but minimal wire), did you notice this? Hate to have a wire melt down.
No I did not and even with the brighter and higher amp headlamps in my car, the voltage drop went from 2.0 volts to just .5 volts which is minimal and 75% less voltage drop than before the relay setup was installed. You will always have some amount of voltage drop due to resistance in the wiring, but you want that drop to be the smallest amount possible. This setup also uses two fuses, one for lo-beams and the other for hi-beams so if one fuse blows (hasn't happened on mine), you still have the other light circuit to run on.

You can probably find other kits with even heavier wire but unlikely you will find them for such a reasonable cost.
 

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Wow, did not notice date on your review until I read another thread...I would say if you have been running this harness for a year with no warm wires than it is a mute issue. The gauge of wire would have more to do with the current carrying capacity/heat than voltage drop for such a short run.

I recall in my youth...used some very thin wire on my radio hot feed. It was fine for a long time until one day, volume on "11" and the wire melted. Perhaps if I had a fuse instead of the paperclip it would have blown :D
 

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Wow, did not notice date on your review until I read another thread...I would say if you have been running this harness for a year with no warm wires than it is a mute issue. The gauge of wire would have more to do with the current carrying capacity/heat than voltage drop for such a short run.

I recall in my youth...used some very thin wire on my radio hot feed. It was fine for a long time until one day, volume on "11" and the wire melted. Perhaps if I had a fuse instead of the paperclip it would have blown :D
True about current carrying capacity but as a conductor heats up from being overloaded with more current than it can carry, the resistance increases and then causes voltage drop so the two are directly related. The fuses on the harness are 30 amps each, I'm pretty sure my headlamps don't draw anywhere near 30 amps. Perhaps if one was loading the wiring with a current demand of closer to the 30 amp rating, the wires might get warm but that's not a situation I have so I don't know.

Great story about your youth and the undersized radio feed wire. Perhaps if you had used a paperclip made of much thinner wire, the paperclip would have acted as a fuse and melted before the wire ;)
 

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Hey guys I had a thread about dim head lights. I was going to just go ahead and do the halogen swap without the harness and then when I saw this thread I decided to get the harness. I am in Canada and they don't ship here. I have a place in Maine and I will have it shipped there . Total cost was only 23.99. I did not need anything else so I paid 5 bucks for shipping. My wife is there so I will have her bring it back.
Hope it is an easy install. Maybe a how to might also help.
 

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Pretty simple to install.

Disconnect negative batt cable.

Best place to mount the 2 relays is on the core support near the horn relay. You can use self-drilling/tapping screws if you wish. Connect the ring terminal on the relay harness to either one of the 2 screws on the bottom of the horn relay bus.

Unplug both headlights from the factory harness. Plug the three prong male connector from the relay harness into the driver's side female headlight socket that you just disconnected from the headlight. This connection will trigger the relays.

Plug the new driver's headlight socket into the back of the driver's side headlight. Route the new harness to follow the existing front light harness in the core support u-channel over to the passenger side. Plug the new socket into the back of that headlight. Tuck the old pass side headlight socket out of the way - it is unused.

Zip tie the new harness to the existing front light harness as you see fit.
 

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Reading the reviews on amazon, there were concerns about wire gauge (thick insulation but minimal wire), did you notice this? Hate to have a wire melt down.
I base my purchases on reviews and after reading the reviews, this unit is a piece of junk that melts parts and hasn't enough copper in the wires to buy gum.
 

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I base my purchases on reviews and after reading the reviews, this unit is a piece of junk that melts parts and hasn't enough copper in the wires to buy gum.
Mark, while reviews can be useful, I went a step further and ordered this item over a year ago, installed it, wrote up my own detailed review and have been using it since without any issues and I do plenty of night driving. Unless you actually purchase, install and test one of these I think you are talking out of turn with your negative opinion of it. No one is twisting your arm to purchase one but seeing as you have not, perhaps you'd do others a service by keeping your opinion that is based only on reviews by others you don't even know to yourself.

There are other similar kits out there which one could use instead. This was the one I tried and it has worked out just fine. The before and after voltage measurements tell the real story with real data. If you have another headlamp relay kit that you have purchased, installed and have real data for, write up a review of it for others to benefit from rather than putting one down you have absolutely no experience with. Good day.
 

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Well , I just ordered one. Didn't get free shipping but it's still a good deal.
 

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I base my purchases on reviews and after reading the reviews, this unit is a piece of junk that melts parts and hasn't enough copper in the wires to buy gum.
After I purchased it online I took a look at the reviews. I do not want anything I have to modify. What is the point of buying a harness in the first place. As with anything everyone has a different take on things. I was able to track down a pair of regular non halogen bulbs and they are only about 6 dollars apiece. I will try one of them to see how much of a difference there is between the old and the new bulbs. I will then make a decision as to whether I really need to upgrade to halogen.
I cancelled the harness from Amazon.
 

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After I purchased it online I took a look at the reviews. I do not want anything I have to modify. What is the point of buying a harness in the first place. As with anything everyone has a different take on things. I was able to track down a pair of regular non halogen bulbs and they are only about 6 dollars apiece. I will try one of them to see how much of a difference there is between the old and the new bulbs. I will then make a decision as to whether I really need to upgrade to halogen.
I cancelled the harness from Amazon.
Like I mentioned earlier Brian, I've been running one for over a year with Halogens and I did NOT modify anything and I've had no issues. Either way best of luck with your headlamp situation.
 

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Like I mentioned earlier Brian, I've been running one for over a year with Halogens and I did NOT modify anything and I've had no issues. Either way best of luck with your headlamp situation.
The fact that you have had a year with it makes a big difference. You did not have to modify the harness. I am not finished with this yet. I am trying the 6214 bulb first then the H6204.
If that does not work I will look into getting the harness.
I will have to take it to the shop to have the harness put in. I will not mess with electrical.
I know it is probably is a plug and play fix, but I trust these guys. The labour cost is not an issue for me.
Thanks for your help and experience.
BTW My daughter lives in Maine and we visit that area a lot. I am undergoing treatments that will not let me travel. My wife flew down this week for the birth of our 5th grandchild. I do love the area.
 

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I plan to order one of these to try out. I also do a lot of night driving. Funny thing is my system is stock but I use an internally regulated alternator. On n low beam and correctly adjusted head lights I still get flashed like I habe high beams on . These people must be light sensative albino's.
 
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