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Hi,
My name is James and I or should I say "we" own a first generation 1967 Camaro, 327 engine, with a 4speed on the floor "Saginaw" transmission. The "we" is actually my father who is the original owner, bought brand new for a whooping price of $3300. I have it now, doing some restoration when the money lets me. Had the wife's bro and friend do some work on the engine to get it running nice and smooth and looking that way too. I know this question has been asked before but I gotta ask it again. I went to the Pertronix I, had trouble with it and went back to points, running good now but have a, what I call, high speed miss, little stuttering and was wondering if going to the Pertronix III would help. Any suggestions if I should just stay with the points or convert it?? Want to keep it as original as I can, since it mostly is, and also, with the points, I'm burning them up pretty quickly. Any help is appreciated.
 

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Welcome aboard james! Question for ya on the Pertronix dizzy, did you run 12V to the coil or did you use the resistor wire?

I run a PerTronix D100800 - PerTronix Flame-Thrower Plug and Play Billet Distributor with Ignitor II® Module...I also have the PerTronix 45011 - PerTronix Flame-Thrower II Ignition Coil and this combo made a huge difference on performance...The dizzy and coil require a 12v source...

Mike
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Mike,

Glad to be here, thanks for the info and for the answer, I ran the Pertronix with the resistor wire, worked fine at first, but then when I put a Flowmaster 40 series on, it started running real rough, thought maybe it was something with the muffler, but when checked it out, the prob was the #3 cylinder had no spark whatsoever. Then the car died and wuldnt start. Put the points back in, started up on first try and ran like a champ, now it's got that "high speed stutter/miss". Maybe needs adjustment on the points and timing but it was set and running good, or maybe just go back to the Pertronix. But will a 12V to the coil make that much of a difference??
 

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James,
There's nothing wrong with running breaker ponits on a street car...If points/dwell are set correctly there's no need for after market stuff.

The points function as a circuit breaker for the primary circuit of the ignition system. The ignition coil must boost the 12 volts of electrical pressure supplied by the battery to as much as 25,000 volts in order to fire the plugs. To do this, the coil depends on the points and the condenser to make a clean break in the primary circuit.

The coil has both primary and secondary circuits. When the ignition is turned on, the battery supplies voltage through the coil and onto the points. The points are connected to ground, completing the primary circuit. As the current passes through the coil, a magnetic field is created in the iron center core of the coil. When the cam in the distributor turns, the points open, breaking the primary circuit. The magnetic field in the primary circuit of the coil then collapses and cuts through the secondary circuit windings around the iron core. Because of the physical principle called electromagnetic induction, the battery voltage is increased to a level sufficient to fire the spark plugs.

When the points open, the electrical charge in the primary circuit tries to jump the gap created between the two open contacts of the points. If this electrical charge were not transferred elsewhere, the metal contacts of the points would start to change rapidly.

The function of the condenser is to absorb excessive voltage from the points when they open and thus prevent the points from becoming pitted or burned.

If you have ever wondered why it is necessary to tune-up your engine occasionally, consider the fact that the ignition system must complete the above cycle each time a spark plug fires. On a 4-cylinder, 4-cycle engine, two of the four plugs must fire once for every engine revolution. If the idle speed of your engine is 800 revolutions per minute (800 rpm), the breaker points open and close two times for each revolution. For every minute your engine idles, your points open and close 1,600 times (2X800=1,600). And that is just at idle. What about at 60 mph?

There are two ways to check breaker point gap: with a feeler gauge or with a dwell meter. Either way you set the points, you are adjusting the amount of time (in degrees of distributor rotation) that the points will remain open. If you adjust the points with a feeler gauge, you are setting the maximum amount of points will open when the rubbing block on the points is on a high point of the distributor cam. When you adjust the points with a dwell meter, you are measuring the number of degrees (of distributor cam rotation) that the points will remain closed before they start to open as a high point of the distributor cam approaches the rubbing block of the points.


There are two rules that should always be followed when adjusting or replacing points. The points and condenser are a matched set; never replace one without replacing the other. If you change the point gap or dwell of the engine, you also change the ignition timing. Therefore, if you adjust the points, you must also adjust the timing.

The usual procedure is to replace the condenser each time that point set is replaced. Although this is not always necessary, it is easy to do at this time and the cost is negligible. Every time you adjust or replace the breaker points, the ignition timing must be checked and, if necessary, adjusted. No special equipment other than a feeler gauge is required for point replacement or adjustment, but a dwell meter is strongly advised. A magnetic tool is handy to prevent the small points and condenser screws from falling down into the distributor.

If you choose to use the Pertronix Ignitor I would call there Tech Support (909-547-9055) and ask them about the resistor wire...

Hope this helps.

Mike
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Mike,

That helps tremendously, never really understood how points, condensor, coil and all really works. Ur explaination makes it simpler to understand. I think I will do as u suggest and call Pertronix and ask them about the resistor wire and such. And since I have the points side of the problem somewhat mastered (thanks to you), now I need to get the Pertronix side mastered. Since I may be able to get some sort of Pertronix set up, I may just put that in, and see what happens after getting their info on the resistor wire, and if it doesnt work, I can always go back to the points set up. Thanks again and I'm glad I joined this forum. Kinda hard to find someone in a auto parts store that has the time and knowledge that people like here have.
Thanks again,
James
 
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