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I have been thinking of getting a set of MT et street drag radials but have read where they recommend a bias ply ET street for 4 speed cars. Anyone have any experience at the track running drag radials with a 4 speed? I don't plan to try to race often but would like to take my car down the local 1/4 miles track a couple times to see what she does.
 

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They work better than street tires, but are not the best choice for a manual trans.

Manuals typically need tire spin to properly launch. The unfortunate part is that radials do not tend to recover from wheel spin as well as bias tires.... meaning on launch the tires spin & do not want to hook back up. Bias tires are better at regaining grip & therefore are the best choice for manuals. On a really sticky track, they may work OK... experimenting is the only way to tell. Good luck.

I know the street manners are way better with radials than bias, so I would prefer them myself if they will work.
 

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They work better than street tires, but are not the best choice for a manual trans.

Manuals typically need tire spin to properly launch. The unfortunate part is that radials do not tend to recover from wheel spin as well as bias tires.... meaning on launch the tires spin & do not want to hook back up. Bias tires are better at regaining grip & therefore are the best choice for manuals. On a really sticky track, they may work OK... experimenting is the only way to tell. Good luck.

I know the street manners are way better with radials than bias, so I would prefer them myself if they will work.
X 2 ............with everything I've read/heard.
 

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A loose converter and trans brake behaves just like side stepping the clutch.

I believe the principle difference is going to be in the side wall construction. The radial construction is going to be stiffer, and as stated above start spinning without a chance to recover without lifting (not a way to win a race). The bias ply with the greater angle in the carcass will absorb the initial shock and remain in contact with the track. With this tire you risk driving over your tire and going into tire shake. Tire shake is all bad and can actually break parts.

This is particularly true if you buy a wider tire than your motor's torque can handle. You have to have some wheel speed (slip) to actually maximize traction.

Modern tire compounds hold a lot better than many beginners think. You won't need a Pro Stock sized tire to get a good launch out of the hole at the track. Just remember these tire are for track use only. They will disappear like magic in a hundred miles or so on the street wearing down to the cord so fast you can practically see it evaporate (this assumes you don't get flat first). Speaking of disappearing, the chemicals in the rubber break down under sunlight and literally evaporate over time that you can generally only get one season of racing per tire. You will want to enjoy the amount of money you spend on your tires so buying tires you can not use (wear out at the track) makes no sense.

I think your best buy will be the drag radial.

Big Dave
 
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