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Discussion Starter #1
Please confirm it doesn't matter where the ballast resistor is mounted? It doesn't need to be grounded correct? I could mount it to the manifold bolt, or drill a hole in the firewall? I'm guessing someone has found a good/easy place to use.
 

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I was under the impression it is mounted where it is to be in the air flow of the blower so it doesnt burn out. The blower cools it....
 

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The American GM have a ballast resistor..with heat sleving around the wire
The British / Aussie Sth Africa GM have a ceramic resistor thats usually mounted on or near the fire wall not too far from the coil/
It is not mounted in this position to "where it is to be in the air flow of the blower so it doesnt burn out. " but rather bnot to scorch or burn anything that may get close... no it doesnt get hot because of the thick ceramic casing
 

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I was under the impression it is mounted where it is to be in the air flow of the blower so it doesnt burn out. The blower cools it....
Good advice for the Heater (blower) resistor.

I would mount the ballast resistor on the firewall away from the heat of the engine.

Jeff
 

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Good advice for the Heater (blower) resistor.

I would mount the ballast resistor on the firewall away from the heat of the engine.

Jeff
Funny how you read one thing and think another. I happened to be working on my blower resistor so thats what I was thinking when I responded! :p
 

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There is no difference in using a resistance wire or a ballest resistor...other than if the resistance wire has been removed, a ballast as used in many Dodges, Fords, and as I mentioned above in Aussie/ NZ British GM Ford Vuaxells roots group European cars
The resistance wire would have been cheaper on the assembly line in most cases.... the main issue with restance wire is the need for heat sheild...and that the wire does have a tendency to oxidize over long periods of time... making replacement of the loom far more expensive.

There is no issue mounting the ballast resistor there.... thu the firewall is the usual area mainly due to it is that area that the ign wires tend to feed thru the firewall, and conviently located for the coil.....which in the case of points dizzy systems the wire between the coil and pionts is of a given length and size .....Given that GM have the dizzy at the rear of the engine...
The Aussie staight 6s where the dizzie is in the middle /side of the engine also have mounted on the firewall... convenient to thew loom thru the firewall.

The "argument "as to engine heat burning it out, just doesnt hold water....considering that the coiled wire inside gets way hotter than any engine heat could ever introduce to it...
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thx for the great info. For wiring the ignition system, I currently have a pink (AAW kit) ignition feed wire from the firewall pass through to the ballast resistor. On the other side of the ballast resistor, there are two wires. 1. Pink ignition feed continuing to the coil (+). 2. Yellow wire that's supposed to go to the 'R' terminal on the starter.

The problem is...my starter doesn't have an R terminal. I assume that was a stock feature, but mine is a summit hi torque mini starter.

Where should this yellow wire go?
 

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Your assumption is correct, that aftermarket mini-starter solenoid is missing the terminal that the yellow wire would normally connect to. The ballast resistor (or resistor wire if you were using that approach instead) reduces the voltage to the primary side of the ignition coil from the full 12-14 volts to 7-9 volts which reduces the arcing and burning of the ignition points, but in doing so creates a weaker secondary high voltage to fire the spark plugs.

Normally during engine cranking the yellow wire would send the full battery voltage to the primary side of the ignition coil creating a higher secondary voltage spark to cause the cold engine to start a bit easier. As soon as the engine starts and you release the ignition switch from the crank position to the run position, the ballast circuit provides the lower voltage.

You have at least the following four choices;

1. Tape off the end of the yellow wire that you have no connection point for with that mini-starter and if the engine starts okay on the resisted primary ignition coil feed, you are all set.

2. Replace the mini-starter or the solenoid on the mini-starter with one that has the extra terminal/connection point for the yellow wire and connect the yellow wire to it so it will function as the original GM designers intended.

3. Run the yellow wire to a momentary push button switch mounted under the dash that is supplied with full battery voltage so when you crank the
engine to start it, you can push the momentary switch causing full battery voltage to go to the ignition coil - you would be manually performing the function that the starter solenoid with the extra terminal does in this case allowing for a hotter spark only while pushing the momentary switch.

4. Get rid of the points and condenser ignition setup and replace with an electronic ignition system that uses the full 12-14 volts of the electrical system and in so doing, you will also eliminate the yellow wire and the ballast resistor.

Hope this helps,
Scott
 
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