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I ran a -8 braided hose from gas tank to start of rocker panel. from there to slightly past firewall, I ran a 1/2" stainless linr from inline tube, then finished it with braided to fuel pump. I used aeroquip hoses aand fittings. I have always had good luck with them.

Going with stainless hard line along the bottom of car, gives better protection from debris etc.

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Jay
69 SS-350 4-speed
Hotchkis suspension

[This message has been edited by JayBird (edited 07-17-2002).]
 

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anytime you use braided it is better than rubber!!!!! like he said use hard line under neath car. i used braided from sump on tank to electric pump then hard line to firewall, then braided to regulator then braided to dual feed braided inlet with pressure gauge in between, goodluck, oh ya i use aero quip but its whatever is availible locally unless you don't mind ordering from summit, goodluck
\Jake

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1968 Camaro convertible, 454,th400,3500 stall,8.5 10 bolt,3.90 gears
 

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Rob,
With over 20 years experience in aviation maintenance I can tell you there are much better ways to spend you cash on your car. I can't think of a single automotive application where stainless braided lines would be necessary. The working pressures for automotive uses don't begin to approach where steel braided lines would be beneficial. However they will provide good chaf protection, this shouldn't be necessary either if you have properly secured you stock lines. Stainless lines are still made of rubber and deteriorate just the same, that is why they are time change items on aircraft. You also have to remember they use AN fittings and your car uses SAE fittings. this can be overcome, but it's additional expense. I'm not sure if aeroquip offers an inverted flare fitting to install on the brake lines, they probably do. However if you like the look and are going for that, this is a popular item.

If you are considering stainless hard lines they offer good corrosion resistance, but working with them is more difficult if you ar making the lines yourself, they are difficult to double flare. That reminds me make sure if you buy them already made that they are double flared, all brake and fuel lines should always be double flared. The only time I have ever seen a single flare stainless line used on aircraft was on Falcon 20 thrust reversers made by Dee Howard and they are prone to cracking at the flares.

Dave

[This message has been edited by SY1 (edited 07-19-2002).]
 

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Talking about flaring, is there a flare to make the nipple that goes on vacuum steel tubes? The reason I ask is I bought one of those Rally Sport vacuum hose kits last year and finally got my headlights working. I now see that in several places where the hose had to make a sharp 180* bend those cheapo hoses are cracked all over the place. Maybe a little better quality hose would not do that (but then you wouldn't have the nice yellow red or blue line on it but you'd save about $50). I was thinking about bending some 3/8 fuel or brake line into semi circles and flaring the ends and attaching with hose where those bends are necessary.
 

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For offroading, people almost always prefer rubber brake lines. The stainless steel braided lines always end up breaking from all of the flex. Lots of people (though certainly not everyone) have had problems with the stainless lines -- cracks, breaks at the connections, frays, etc. Rubber lines are more robust over time.

Now, keep in mind that the application is quite a bit different than here. But that is the only experience I have.

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K.A. Young

67 SS 350
PowerGlide AT
AC, Deluxe Interior

Daily Driver
 

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Winch,
I think what you are refering to is the bulbed flare on the end of nipples that help to hold the rubber hose on the tube. they do make a special tool to bulb the steel lines. I'm not sure who would sell it locally for you. I can check in my aviation tool supplier catalogs to see if there is an inexpensive one listed anywhere. I've often needed one myself. I won't be out to the hangar until Monday evening, I'll check then.

Dave

[This message has been edited by SY1 (edited 07-20-2002).]
 
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