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Discussion Starter #1
Hi hello
Recently purchased a 1968 Camaro with a brake issue. When I test drive it brake was really spongy. Barely any brake pressure. Pervious owner stated it just needs a good bleeding. Of course he lied. So far I have replaced Master cylinder, booster and distribution block. Bleed many times by both vacuum and old fashion pumping the brake. I even tried the changing the bleeding valve to quick bleeding so air can't get in. Still no brake pressure. When car is off I get some pressure but when car is on no pressure. Pedal goes to the floor. Please help.
Things I done so far.
Bench bleed MC.
New booster.
New distribution block.
Bleed brake so many ways. And no air bubbles. I must have gone through 4 big bottles of brake fluid.
Front disk and rear drums.
What am I missing ?
 

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11 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Update to my story
Turns out the last owner had installed the brake caliber backwards with the bleeder valve pointed down. I reversed it and rebleed. Bang! Brake pressure back
I can now enjoy the car
 

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I would have figured you'd notice the bleeders on the bottom when you 1st started bleeding the brakes?
 

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Yup, I just logged in when I saw your post to tell you to check on that Very thing - calipers on the wrong side. That bit me too and I spent more days trying to figure that one out that I really care to admit!
 

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Premium Member
Brett - Leander, Texas 1969 SS396
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1,406 Posts
You mean it makes a difference? I thought that since the system is under pressure, the air would be the first thing to come out regardless of the orientation of the valve. I have Wilwoods, which have bleeders up and down, but I didn't know it made a difference. What is the theory behind "Gravity Bleeding" then and does that mean the reverse bleed that pushes the air out through the top (Master) is preferred?

Brett....
 

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Joined
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13,850 Posts
You mean it makes a difference? I thought that since the system is under pressure, the air would be the first thing to come out regardless of the orientation of the valve. I have Wilwoods, which have bleeders up and down, but I didn't know it made a difference. What is the theory behind "Gravity Bleeding" then and does that mean the reverse bleed that pushes the air out through the top (Master) is preferred?

Brett....
Air always rises to the top.
 
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