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Discussion Starter #1
I have done a search here and couldn't find any comparisons.I want to upgrade I have 15" wheels and non power brakes and I am staying with non power.

Which would be the best and the best cost it will be on my Pro-Street.I have a Wilwood master on the car now.Oh it also has an-4 hoses going from the frame to the calipor is this ok.

I dont want to brake the bank with this I would just like a better stopping and quieter.Thanks for the help in advance
 

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We sell a ton of Wilwood, Actually made the Top 10 in Wilwood sales last year. Wilwood brakes are one of the only brakes you can buy that are actually designed to be manual brakes, which is huge in a manula brake application. Many brake that ARE NOT designed to be power brakes, like many factory brake systems that are popular conversions, work horrible as manual brake application

As mentioined, we have a 10.75" front kit and a 12.2" rear kit for your car with 15" wheels.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Jim I have the aftermarket 8mm gm style and the squeek and don't have a lot of stop power.They came with the chassis from Checkered Racing he offers an up grade but I would like to shop on here possably with Frank.

Frank,if you can PM me with some numbers or I can call you on Monday.Jeff the guy I got my frame from said the only thing I need to know is that the spindles are Mustang II and the size of the bolts in the ford housing ends which I think are 3/8".I was thinking of getting a kit for front with rotors and a wilwood replacment for the 8MM and keeping the rotors out back is all this possable you think....
 

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Dave, can you get more details on the specific parts used on your existing system?
Manual disks without a lot of stopping power is often due to a mismatch in caliper piston size and master cylinder bore size. You can check the master by unbolting it and pulling it out a bit, and measure the ID of the bore with a caliper.
 
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