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Discussion Starter #1
So I’m pretty mechanically inclined but I have little knowledge in terms of electrical wiring. So I guess my question is how good are the instructions with this kit? Are they straight forward in terms of telling you EXACTLY what wires to hook to what spot or do they assume you know certain things about wiring? Thx
 

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Probably. The classic update kit assumes that you have changed some things. None of the rear body or underhood connections are cut to length. All wires are labeled as to their function, its printed on the wire. I didn't note what year you have but if its a 67 the kit will be handing you a 68 fuse block setup and a 68 headlight switch. The kit also does not handle 67 hideaway headlights. Be conscious of your grounds to the point of being anal about them. Buy the crimpers.
 

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It all comes down to how well you interperit the instructions, how well you can crimp terminals, and know where to cut the wires to length. other than that it is a breeze
 

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Excellent thank you. So the wiring diagram is all you get? I was hoping it would include pics of the more complex connections or something.
Each subkit has a wiring diagram and some instructions. They have some videos you can download which will show you how to crimp etc.

Don
 

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Most of what i would call complex connections are behind the dash so thats pretty much handled. What have you got going on with this car? Your first challenge is going to be fitting the 68 fuse block in. You need to enlarge the hole in the firewall. This is gonna be a pain in an assembled car...but...you have to do it. The 67 block isnt up to the current task...no pun intended. The kit assumes a neutral safety switch. A stick 67 doesnt have one. There are things like this you have to handle. If you get over the first hurdle, which is your discomfort with the electrical work, it can be satisfying and fun to do. The box is kind of organized. It has a read me first order to it. Dont cheat. Have some quart refrigerator bags around if you cant help but open stuff up before you need to. The kit covers camaros and firebirds. You will have leftover parts.
And buy the crimpers...
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Most of what i would call complex connections are behind the dash so thats pretty much handled. What have you got going on with this car? Your first challenge is going to be fitting the 68 fuse block in. You need to enlarge the hole in the firewall. This is gonna be a pain in an assembled car...but...you have to do it. The 67 block isnt up to the current task...no pun intended. The kit assumes a neutral safety switch. A stick 67 doesnt have one. There are things like this you have to handle. If you get over the first hurdle, which is your discomfort with the electrical work, it can be satisfying and fun to do. The box is kind of organized. It has a read me first order to it. Dont cheat. Have some quart refrigerator bags around if you cant help but open stuff up before you need to. The kit covers camaros and firebirds. You will have leftover parts.
And buy the crimpers...
Thanks, you convinced me. But should I buy the crimpers 🤔
 

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I thought it was fairly easy with the AAW instructions along with the factory assembly manual which shows where to run and attach the wire.
Crimping everything takes time, and I also used wire loom on all of it.
 

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Yes, buy/rent the correct crimpers and take your time. If you buy them, they will sell if you don’t want them. Like others have said, watch the videos. You won’t be disappointed!
 

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AAW makes a great product and I think the instructions are pretty straight forward and easy to follow. Buy the crimp tools and also do yourself a long term favor.....use/apply dielectric grease on all crimps and connections. It makes the crimps easier and prevents corrosion/oxidation.
 

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The instructions are straight forward.

Take note how the original wires are routed. This is not in the instructions.

Don't run all your wires at one time and then start testing. If you have a problem, it could be hard to figure out what is wrong. You could have multiple problems. After you run a circuit, then test it. For example, when you run your wires to the headlights, turn them on to see it they light up. If they work, then run your wires to the blinkers and test them.

Bad crimps and bad grounds are going to be the most common problems you will experience.
 

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Update kit because you want to save money, or because you've got a lot of additional electrical needs?
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Update kit because you want to save money, or because you've got a lot of additional electrical needs?
Just seems like it's the most popular. I am adding Holley sniper EFI and Vintage air and want a modern system.
 

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I'm in the process of installing the AAW Update in my 69, and will be installing a Sniper EFI with Hyperspark after I get it up and running again. It's not difficult skill wise but it's time consuming. You have to cut every wire and crimp a new connector on. So far I've done the dash harness and the engine and headlight harness. I have power brakes so that meant removing the brake booster for access to the bulkhead connector. I'm not sure it it's different for a small block, but with a big block it's no easy feat accessing the firewall bolts on the booster.

Also be aware that if you get the update kit it eliminates the stock voltage regulator so you'll have to get an alternator with an internal regulator.

As others have said, get the crimper and watch the videos. They give you a few spare connectors to practice with, but those are limited and you really have to pay attention to which connectors are being used. They have great instructions, but I've still screwed up a few times and used the wrong connector.

You are replacing every connection and wire one by one so in return you do learn about your cars entire electrical system.

Scott
 

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Whats helped me a few times was to mark up the AAW wiring schematic to include all my modifications for things like
ignition,ECU,Fan 1&2,Neutral safety relay, etc...

I've referenced my schematic "as built's" a few times when changing things.
 

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Whats helped me a few times was to mark up the AAW wiring schematic to include all my modifications for things like
ignition,ECU,Fan 1&2,Neutral safety relay, etc...

I've referenced my schematic "as built's" a few times when changing things.
Yes I also do schematics of additions and changes I make as most of my projects are LS Swap Cars.

Not so much for myself buy I always get talked into selling my cars and they are good for the new owners to have.

I do a schematic of the fuel system as well including part#s for the fittings used.

Not sure what crimpers are recommended.

I use a ratchet crimper with the different size dies for the size of wire and type connector you are using.

A good supply of tie wraps (zip ties) help in routing and securing the harnesses to achieve a neat job when finished.
 

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The classic Update kit is easier than the one you have to terminate all the ends yourself. In old and new combos there might be some little issues. Like, if you are keeping the old alternator, the update kit has wiring for the newer one wire. If you have a console be sure to get the extra harness.
 

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With the Classic Update you do have to cut the wires to final length and crimp the connectors onto the wires.

The Factory Fit has the connector installed.
 
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