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Inside our camaro car clocks is a little barrel shaped component with wire wrapped around it from bottom to top (kind of like an armature).

The beginning of the wire is soldered to the metal plate holding the "barrel" against the non-conductive board.

The other end of wire goes to a little separate plate on the non-conductive board where the "hot" wire plugs into the backside of the clock from the dash wiring harness.

This is a major component of the "points" that's runs the main spring by popping open ever 2 minutes or so.

My little tiny wire broke that goes from the "barrel" to the "hot plug."

I am thinking about trying to rewire the "barrel" but I'm trying to do some internet research about it first.

Thanks
 

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Inside our camaro car clocks is a little barrel shaped component with wire wrapped around it from bottom to top (kind of like an armature).

The beginning of the wire is soldered to the metal plate holding the "barrel" against the non-conductive board.

The other end of wire goes to a little separate plate on the non-conductive board where the "hot" wire plugs into the backside of the clock from the dash wiring harness.

This is a major component of the "points" that's runs the main spring by popping open ever 2 minutes or so.

My little tiny wire broke that goes from the "barrel" to the "hot plug."

I am thinking about trying to rewire the "barrel" but I'm trying to do some internet research about it first.

Thanks
I think you're referring to the 12-volt solenoid...the clocks are run through a set of contact points wired in series with the solenoid coil. As the clock runs, an arm with one contact point moves closer to its mating contact. The design is such that it allows the points to close, completing the circuit before the spring winding runs down. At that instant of contact, the solenoid gets 12 volts, and the arm that had been stationary pulls in, and it kicks the contact on the moving arm, which then swings the mechanism around rewinding the clock. This motion not only winds the clock again, but it breaks the circuit at the same time. It's the kick of the 12-volt solenoid that makes that periodic “thunk” you’ll hear if you sit in a car when it’s really quiet. :D
 

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Yes, Yes, that's it!!
Thanks
Do you think it's possible for me to "rewind" the wire & thereby repair the solenoid?
It's a rather tedious job, but, doable. If you've never done it before and don't want to completely mess it up, I'd suggest having it repaired by a "vintage clock repair shop". Good luck :beers:
 
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