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A couple of years ago I saw an article on a cathodic protection device that fit into the radiator cap. Has anyone seen this or was it a brain f*rt? With iron, aluminum, and copper in most of our water systems do the antifreeze solutions provide enough protection?.
 

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There was a deal that dangled under the radatior cap. don't remember anything more about it.
If your antifreeze is up to snuff, I doubt you need any thing more.
David

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A few companies made them for cars a few years back. Sacrificial anodes originated from, and continue to be very popular with, boaters who run their engines in salt water; they often refer to them as "zincs".

Basically, the anode gets chewed up instead of other important metal bits, such as an aluminum intake manifold. Are they necessary in a car engine? Probably not, but I run one just for extra protection.
 

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i think they still sell them out of the JCWhitney catalog.
 

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I agree - they may not help but they sure can't hurt. I believe I got mine at Pep Boys and have had no problems with my 67.
 

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The US Navy uses zincs extensively on ships. I was on submarines and we had hundreds of 10lb zinc plates bolted to the hull at various places. They really helped stop the corrosion in salt water, but I doubt that antifreeze in your radiator is corrosive enough to justify using zincs - sounds like a marketing ploy to me.
 

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Any dissimilar metals are prone to electolytic attack,especially in an environment of temerature excursions, moisture and electrical bias (ie: battery currents).

Anything tin and thin will eventually erode. Most of the metals are thick and will almost never be noticed, However i had a thermostat housing (one of those chrome finsished jap type) sufer electrolytic attack by exhibiting small series of pits form from the inside out and eat a hole into the housing (again thin tin). So be ware of the cheap thermostate housings and electrolytic attack, However the entire dissimilar metals in the engine are also under attack as long as the battery is attached. Although the thickness if the majority of parts subjected to this process would take a really long time to affect most parts.
 
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