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Discussion Starter #1
The following was posted in the CRG forum regarding CE engines (CRG seems to be down right now?):

Quoting from the Chevrolet Dealer Service Information Bulletin, 69-I-1, dated 19 Sept, 1968:
The first letter will designate the GM division which produced the engine. C-Chevrolet L-Oldsmobile K-Cadillac B-Buick P-Pontiac The second letter will designate the type of unit "E" engine or "T" transmission. The number following the letter will designate the model year "9" for 1969. The last five digits specify the service replacement unit sequence number. The group of numbers to be used by Chevrolet manufacturing plants [for engines] are as follows:
Flint motor plant (L-6 engines) 00001 to 19999Flint V-8 engine plant 20000 to 49999Tonowanda motor plant 50000 to 79999Example: Number CE900175 designates Chevrolet engine - 1969 year, and the 175th unit produced for service at the Flint motor plant.
This numbering system applies to service engine assemblies, partial engines, fitted cylinder cases, cylinder cases, transmission assemblies and transmission cases.
My question:
I have an engine that has been in my '69 Corvette since late 1969 - within 3 months of the car's original purchase. It is coded: CE9B44296

Does anyone have any idea what significance the B after the 9 means?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hi John, since I posted the original message this morning, CRG has come back up and I've further searched and found a post by Mark C which said:
"Don't think that reference that a CE engine with an A suffix has been recycled (ie second time around) is correct. I've seen A, B and C suffixes on CE engine stamps. In the case of Flint built CE small block engines that would be 30,000 CE engines (or bare block, fitted block or complete engines), 30000 CEA engines, 30000 CEBs and then some number of CEC engines (assuming no CED engines exist), Thats at least 90,000 small blocks which is one heck of alot of replacement engines, or engine assemblies.

I believe (my theory) that the A, B and C suffixes indicate the type of components that made up the replacement. A CE number indicates a complete engine, or perhaps a short block. CEA is a fitted block (block, pistons rings and rods, but no crank or cam), CEB is a block only, CEC ?? Always looking to be educated though. Bring on the documentation. "


Someone had theorized that the A, B, C, etc.. were used when the 30,000 sequence was 'used up'.. which would mean a LOT of failed engines!! I think I agree with Mark's theory; and I bet the letters mean something specific! I'm searching for what it means. My engine has not been out of the car since late '1969. The original owner 'swore' to me that it was original and had NEVER been out of the car.. but after 30+ yrs, people's memory fail them. especially if they got a NEW engine when the car was almost new, which was the case with my engine. If Mark C. is online, I'd love to hear from him if he learned anymore since his post of a couple of years ago... :)
 

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Hi John, since I posted the original message this morning, CRG has come back up and I've further searched and found a post by Mark C which said:
"Don't think that reference that a CE engine with an A suffix has been recycled (ie second time around) is correct. I've seen A, B and C suffixes on CE engine stamps. In the case of Flint built CE small block engines that would be 30,000 CE engines (or bare block, fitted block or complete engines), 30000 CEA engines, 30000 CEBs and then some number of CEC engines (assuming no CED engines exist), Thats at least 90,000 small blocks which is one heck of alot of replacement engines, or engine assemblies.

I believe (my theory) that the A, B and C suffixes indicate the type of components that made up the replacement. A CE number indicates a complete engine, or perhaps a short block. CEA is a fitted block (block, pistons rings and rods, but no crank or cam), CEB is a block only, CEC ?? Always looking to be educated though. Bring on the documentation. "


Someone had theorized that the A, B, C, etc.. were used when the 30,000 sequence was 'used up'.. which would mean a LOT of failed engines!! I think I agree with Mark's theory; and I bet the letters mean something specific! I'm searching for what it means. My engine has not been out of the car since late '1969. The original owner 'swore' to me that it was original and had NEVER been out of the car.. but after 30+ yrs, people's memory fail them. especially if they got a NEW engine when the car was almost new, which was the case with my engine. If Mark C. is online, I'd love to hear from him if he learned anymore since his post of a couple of years ago... :)
Your explaination could be valid, but I have always thought this sequence of letters after the 9 , would indicate the shift the core was made on, but then my CE block has an A also and was actually a fitted block.
I have also understood that in 69 , the Flint replacement engines began with 20000 starting numbers to 49999. Being an old warranty clerk and parts mgr, I can recall but the mind does loose its edge over time. Yes, lets see what Mark has to say.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Don,

If the letter indicated 'shift'.. wouldn't all the engines have such a letter? In fact, most CE engines do not have the additiona 'A', or 'B' letter....

As a warranty clerk, and parts manager, can you recall what process was used to record the removed/replaced engine codes for a warranty replacement engine swap? Did the dealerships return such records, or pass them back to Chevrolet? or ??
 

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Don,

If the letter indicated 'shift'.. wouldn't all the engines have such a letter? In fact, most CE engines do not have the additiona 'A', or 'B' letter....

As a warranty clerk, and parts manager, can you recall what process was used to record the removed/replaced engine codes for a warranty replacement engine swap? Did the dealerships return such records, or pass them back to Chevrolet? or ??
I presumed the shift letter was to be at the end of all stamps, right side but since you mentioned having a letter after the year, then I was thinking maybe thats the way it was done, I am seeing conflicts here on this shift letter.
We were a small Chevy dealer in another 2 dog town. We accepted what came in on the car inoperative order that was authorized by the zone rep. We did not even restamp the vin on the new block in some cases. If there was instruction to, we never saw it. Once the orginal motor was out of the vehicle and viewed by rep , we had instructions to destroy block, with a 20# ford tool. We did in cases, record the CE stamping on the warranty repair order.
The POP information stamped on the repair order , had the orginal stamp information so there was no duplication here at our dealership.

Now a question for you, do you know what your cast date stamp is? My block was a 1970 replacement so it may bear something differant from yours.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Don,

I don't have the cast date for the CE engine here at work, but I recall it being within a month or two of the vehicle manufacture date (Aug/Sept timeframe for the car).. I'm thinking late Sept on the engine, but I will try to check that tonight... Note: all of the other parts on the engine (heads, intake, carb, etc) are the ones from the original production; only the block number with the CE and the date a month or so behind the car production is off. I have never had the engine out in the 20 yrs I've owned it, so I can't say for sure about the internals, but I can almost guarantee the engine internals are correct for the 350/350 as it 'runs' correctly for that engine... (41K miles on the car now)...
 

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Discussion Starter #8
This CE block is an '010' block, and was cast on September 18, 1969 (I 18 9). The car has the following info: body build 7 Aug '69, original engine stamped code V0725HX. The car was SOLD to the original owner on 30 August 69 off the showroom floor at the dealership (I have the Protect-o-plate, which is where the original engine info, and sales info came from). I do not know exactly when the engine was replaced with the CE engine, but it was likely sometime between late September and December of 1969... all the peripheral engine components (heads, intake, carb, etc) are dated consistently with the original engine data.
 

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I have several notes picked up over the years that indicate that "CE" codes with the letter after the year-of-manufacture number identify re-runs of the original assigned engine plant number blocks after they used up the original block of numbers, and they started showing up in late 1969 (the 5/50 powertrain warranty started in 1967).

Flint V-8 was assigned a supplemental block of numbers from A90000-A99999 in addition to their previously-assigned A20000-A49999, and Tonawanda prefixed the "A" to their previously-assigned50000-79999 block of numbers.

I have one in my '69 Z/28 from the Flint V-8 supplemental block of numbers - it's stamped "CE0A96509", and I know it was installed in June, 1970 as a complete short block (plus one new 186 cylinder head dated E 6 0).

Research continues.... :)
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks John! :) Your inputs are always valuable and much appreciated!... :)
Did the 'squence number' on the CE engines continue running over all the years, OR did it 're-initiate' on each calendar year?

PS. Re your 'Z28 engine. What is the car's date of manufacture, and what cast date is the 'original head'??
 

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I agree with John Z, as I had a CE block stamped "CE0A95???", with a 5/70 stamp on the pan rail. This was a warranty block for a 69Z, which was originally built May 69, then blown up about 1 year later, getting the CE short block in mid 70 as a warranty item.
 

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Thanks John! :) Your inputs are always valuable and much appreciated!... :)
Did the 'squence number' on the CE engines continue running over all the years, OR did it 're-initiate' on each calendar year?

PS. Re your 'Z28 engine. What is the car's date of manufacture, and what cast date is the 'original head'??
Can't answer the sequence number question conclusively - need more good data.

Mine is an 02D car, built February 27th, and the original head is dated B-19-9.

:beers:
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks John, I sold my original heads and installed angle plug heads back in the '70's... so I'm looking for the *best* dated heads to install on my original engine... in your case, the head(s) were cast only 8 days prior to car production? That is closer than I would have imagined. My car was an 09C production (best guess is 18Sep69).. my engine was cast 26Aug and assembled on 27Aug. Most of the information I've gotten has indicated heads 1 to 3 weeks in front of the engine assembly which would be 4 to 6 weeks for the heads prior to production. Can you explain why there would be such variation between Feb and Sep??
 

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this code thing must be all messed up because I have a 68Z with the block stamp of :
CEB1309-2MO (010 block)

In addition I have replacement heads #3991492 that have correct porting for the 302.

I would like to determine if it is in fact a 302 engine ? Any way to determine that?

Everything else matches the car (03D) , trans, rear end , ect. Nice straight 68 w/52K miles.
 

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this code thing must be all messed up because I have a 68Z with the block stamp of :
CEB1309-2MO (010 block)

In addition I have replacement heads #3991492 that have correct porting for the 302.

I would like to determine if it is in fact a 302 engine ? Any way to determine that?

Everything else matches the car (03D) , trans, rear end , ect. Nice straight 68 w/52K miles.
If you could find one of those old P/g tools , that measures swept volume of air from the cly, that would work. If the heads are off, you could measure stroke of cly?
I am sorta confused too with CE stamp data also as my 3rd replacement block was fitted.
CE0A20629, replaced in mid 70's.
 

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CE4N31785 Code 283 Engine

Hi there, guys, and greetings from Chile.


I'm currently rebuilding a 283 C.I.D., for a boat project, and I'd like to have more info about this engine, because nothing seems to fit, nor match. For example:


1) Engine ID code is CE4N31875. This tells me that the engine is a replacement one, built at Flint V-8 Engine Plant.


2) Casting number was deliberately erased.


3) Cylinder heads have a compression volume of 60 cc., or 3.66 ci (10.66:1 compression), and they don't have the typical threaded holes to install the alternator and other accessories.


4) The block has an open PCV system.


Please, if anyone has any info about this engine, please let me know.
















 

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One of the magazine websites has a head identification article going right now. I deleted it this morning. (Powernation)? Sound like the old Powerpac heads.
 

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CE4N3125 Can anyone decode this? :confused:

Thank you
 

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Beginning in 1969, Chevy added accessory holes to the front of all its cylinder heads to facilitate mounting alternator and air conditioning brackets to the front of the engine. Older heads do not have these bolt holes, requiring the use of a short water pump and different brackets.
 
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