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68 RS L30 AA 749
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I presume you guys change your brake fluid periodically ? :)How can you tell the old fluid is completely removed and replaced with new without introducing air into the system. In the past, I would simply let gravity do the bleeding by opening each wheel cylinder/ caliper and topping off the master cylinder when it gets low. I'd rotate fluids between changes from blue to the conventional yellow/amber so it was easy to distinguish, but nowadays blue brake fluid is no longer offered at a reasonable price. This is what I used previously, but is now discontinued.
RARE ATE Super Blue Fluid - DOT4 - SEALED NEVER OPENED - FREE SHIP | eBay

Wondering if there is some type of dye safe to add to the hydraulic system ?
 

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For me its easy to see the old "dark" fluid stops coming out when the "new" clearer fluid starts to come out. Actually more easy to see it in the clear plastic tube I use that goes into the recovery bottle. Basic 2 person bleeding procedure.

If doing a gravity bleed use a clear tube, small bottle to more easily see the color change vs just letting the fluid drip direct out of bleeder
 

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68 SS/RS, 460 BB 4 speed, 3.73 Posi, new paint, motor mods , trans and diff assembly. 2" Drop
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I use a pressure bleeder on a car system, as stated just watch the color change from old to new fluid in the line. I get a quart bottle and run that through all 4 corners which is more than adequate. Fluid is cheap and any leftovers are useless, so I over bleed just to be sure.
 

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I presume you guys change your brake fluid periodically ? :)How can you tell the old fluid is completely removed and replaced with new without introducing air into the system. In the past, I would simply let gravity do the bleeding by opening each wheel cylinder/ caliper and topping off the master cylinder when it gets low. I'd rotate fluids between changes from blue to the conventional yellow/amber so it was easy to distinguish, but nowadays blue brake fluid is no longer offered at a reasonable price. This is what I used previously, but is now discontinued.
RARE ATE Super Blue Fluid - DOT4 - SEALED NEVER OPENED - FREE SHIP | eBay

Wondering if there is some type of dye safe to add to the hydraulic system ?
Be careful not to get any brake fluid on the carpet Garth! :p

Don
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
For me its easy to see the old "dark" fluid stops coming out when the "new" clearer fluid starts to come out. Actually more easy to see it in the clear plastic tube I use that goes into the recovery bottle. Basic 2 person bleeding procedure.

If doing a gravity bleed use a clear tube, small bottle to more easily see the color change vs just letting the fluid drip direct out of bleeder
If the color between new and old amber fluid is that distinguishable, you're probably not changing it soon enough. I believe 2yrs is recommended.

Yep, gotta use a clear tube to keep it off the carpet! ;)
 

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I presume you guys change your brake fluid periodically ? :)
I use my MityVac to completely suck out the fluid from the MC reservoir. (There will be no danger of introducing air). Fill up the reservoir with new fluid and pump the pedal until clear fluid emerges at each brake cylinder. Or use the MityVac again at each brake cylinder.

Starting with a full reservoir of new fluid allows the new fluid to immediately flush the lines without waiting for the reservoir fluid to clear up.
 

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The ATE fluid with the yellow cap is actually yellow in color. The "rare" stuff I posted from ebay is too expensive!
Didn't see a specific cost limitation needed, so it is still available. Every 3 to 5 years , what does that come to yearly cost. $75 for a liter. So about $15 a year to use it. Cheaper than gas or oil now a days.

I use the whole quart bottle if I don't see a color change. That should make it good. Start at furthest away point and work my way back to left front.
 

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If the color between new and old amber fluid is that distinguishable, you're probably not changing it soon enough. I believe 2yrs is recommended.

Yep, gotta use a clear tube to keep it off the carpet! ;)
Well, to me, I see a slight color difference between old & new fluid. Not a big color change but enough to notice

Aside from that though I 1/2 fill a 12 oz plastic bottle on each wheel,,,actually a little less on front brakes on each wheel as I do the RR, LR, RF, LF 2 person bleed and use about a full qt bottle of DOT3 so the system is fully purged. I have a small syringe I use to remove the old stuff from MC first

Have done brakes on all my cars for over 50 years and 2 yearish brake bleeds are SOP

I also have hydraulic clutch car where I flush fluid in that system.
 

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What I read, Tracer Dye is for Petroleum based. Wouldn't go well with Glycol brake fluid.
Perhaps, I'm no chemist but it only takes about 1/10 ml. to treat 2000 ml. There is an in depth PDF data sheet if anyone wants to research this.


Leak-Detecting Dye for Hydraulic Systems
Easy-to-see colors enable you to visually inspect for leaks without ultraviolet light.
Use 1 oz. of dye for every 50 gallons of oil, solvent, wax, or other industrial fluid you're inspecting.
Fluorescent red dye can be enhanced with a UV flashlight.


Liquid
ColorMax. Amount of
Water Treated, gal.
Container
Size, oz.
Each
Red20041400T23$20.80
Fluorescent Red20041400T2260.18
Blue20041400T2132.78
UV Mini Flashlight for Fluorescent Red Dye1159N2Each$41.67
 

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DOT 3 is not Hydraulic fluid. It is polyethylene glycol-based fluid. DOT 4 & DOT 5 also not petroleum based either. Add Tracer fluid if you want.

What is DOT 3 Brake Fluid?
DOT 3 brake fluid is polyethylene glycol-based fluid that has been designed to withstand very cold temperatures without thickening and to endure high temperatures without boiling. The typical boiling temperature of DOT 3 brake fluid is around 250° C. This product usually has a yellow to amber appearance and a mild glycol odour. This product is slightly soluble in water however this does degrade the quality of the fluid if water mixes with the product. All DOT brake fluids must meet an industrial standard to be allowed for sale in the market place.
DOT 3 Brake Fluid - Automotive Brake Fluids | Solventis

What is DOT 4 Brake Fluid?
DOT 4 brake fluids are glycol ether-based and have an addition of borate esters, which improves its performance
DOT 3 vs DOT 4 vs DOT 5: What are The Differences? – Rx Mechanic

What is DOT 5 Brake Fluid?
DOT 5 brake fluids are silicon fluid, and it is used in most modern cars. It is more expensive compared to others since it has a high bylining point. It has a dry boiling temperature of 356 degrees.
DOT 3 vs DOT 4 vs DOT 5: What are The Differences? – Rx Mechanic
 

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DOT 3 is not Hydraulic fluid. It is polyethylene glycol-based fluid. DOT 4 & DOT 5 also not petroleum based either. Add Tracer fluid if you want.
Not saying I would (or wouldn't), just saying there is information available for anybody who wants to research it. Besides there a whole spectrum of fluids (non petroleum included) that this stuff is supposed to work with. My thinking is, water isn't good to have in brake fluid either and is in much higher concentration levels before it has adverse effects, This stuff in solution is like 0.001% so will it effect the brake fluid? I don't know but It shouldn't be too hard to find out.
 

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ATE Super Blue is no longer available in this country since congress, in its infinite wisdom, decided only certain car fluids could be blue, and brake fluid did not make the list. If you find some, it is pretty old and way overpriced. Contrary to what most of the sellers claim, there is no difference between ATE Super Blue and the yellow ATE Dot 4. EXACT same specs. It was only tinted blue to make it easier to see the diff.

I hoarded a few cans, but sadly it is all used up. It was really easy to see when the "new" fluid came through, as I just alternated every other change from yellow to blue and back. But I am not going to pay triple (or more) price just to get some blue.

Now, I just use regular DOT 4. Normally, it is still relatively easy to spot the "new" fluid coming through.
 

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Garth:

You are right about cost when using fluorescent dyes. Not cost effective unless you have lot of leaks to trace.

Dye 1 oz. $30 plus ship
Fluurescent inspection tool kit. $90 plus ship

Just can't find any manufacturer who has made a glycol or silicone fluid soluble dye to date.
 
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