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Sorry ahead of time for the long post.

I have been painting in, or managing one of two shops for the last 40 years. 18 years in the first shop, (9 as head painter, 9 as manager) and 22 in the shop I'm at now, (13 as head painter, 9 as manager) so I have plenty of experience with lacquer, synthetic enamel, acrylic enamel, polyurethane enamel, and today's urethane base/clear systems.

Almost every person replying in this thread are correct when they say, lacquer is not very durable. It is very brittle and susceptible to cracking. Just the expansion of sheet metal when hot in the summer, to cold at night or the winter, is enough movement to cause the eventual failure of lacquer. OEMs used lacquer back in the day, and that's why you saw those vehicles loaded with crazing and cracking after only a few years unless they were very pampered.

The dull or less shiny look you might be referring to about lacquer may be how it looks right after applying it. It dries very quickly, so novices liked that, and the need for a booth is less. But you need to apply lots of paint, because you have to wet sand and buff the finish to get the gloss and shine you're looking for. If it's a metallic color and you don't clear it, you then risk the chance of sanding though and seeing blotches and light or dark spots because each coat of metallic paint varies with air pressure, and gun speed and distance, and you "will" be sanding a few coats off before buffing.

Enamels came out to eliminate all that work, because they were glossy, (when applied correctly) right out of the gun. But, the down side was if you got any imperfections, dirt, lint, a run, you were stuck with it. It was not buffer friendly like lacquer was, but with lacquer's hardness and ability to be buffed, came it's brittleness as well.

Now came todays urethane enamel paints. The best of both worlds and then some. The base coat dries fast like lacquer, but you don't need a ton of coats because you won't be sanding and buffing it. The clear top coat is what gives you your shine, and when sprayed correctly, it lays down nice and flat. The advantage though, over that glossy enamel that you sprayed years ago is, next day you can buff any imperfection out of the urethane enamel clear.

Urethane paints have...
The speed of lacquer for the base.
The shine of enamel for the clear.
The buffability of lacquer for the clear. (but just much less labor intensive)
And last but not least, the most durable finish of them all.
 

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Forest Green was not a 69 Camaro color?
:) Run Forrest Run!

The word "Forest" does not show up in the Camaro color chart. :D

Exterior Related - Camaro FAQ

In 69 it was: Fathom, Rallye or Frost
in 68 it was: Grecian, Rallye, Seafrost, British or Sequoia
in 67 it was: Mountain.

Strange how 67s had 2 turquoise's, but only 1 green, 68's had 1 turquoise, 2 teals and 5 greens! :)
 

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Simple answers here: A Z/28 painted it's non-original colour could hurt the value just as much as it helps it. Depends on the buyer. OP, are you planning to sell? IMO, Fathom Green is one of the best colours on a '69, but that's just my opinion and I understand some are opposed to green and prefer popular (albeit way overdone!) colours like Lemans Blue, Hugger Orange, etc.

Above all, I would prefer high quality body work and a paint job in any factory colour over something of lower quality in a popular factory colour. Forget lacquer paint, it was used back when there was no better alternative. Paints have come a long way since those days and the results from a modern system are far superior.
 

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Sorry ahead of time for the long post.

I have been painting in, or managing one of two shops for the last 40 years. 18 years in the first shop, (9 as head painter, 9 as manager) and 22 in the shop I'm at now, (13 as head painter, 9 as manager) so I have plenty of experience with lacquer, synthetic enamel, acrylic enamel, polyurethane enamel, and today's urethane base/clear systems.

Almost every person replying in this thread are correct when they say, lacquer is not very durable. It is very brittle and susceptible to cracking. Just the expansion of sheet metal when hot in the summer, to cold at night or the winter, is enough movement to cause the eventual failure of lacquer. OEMs used lacquer back in the day, and that's why you saw those vehicles loaded with crazing and cracking after only a few years unless they were very pampered.

The dull or less shiny look you might be referring to about lacquer may be how it looks right after applying it. It dries very quickly, so novices liked that, and the need for a booth is less. But you need to apply lots of paint, because you have to wet sand and buff the finish to get the gloss and shine you're looking for. If it's a metallic color and you don't clear it, you then risk the chance of sanding though and seeing blotches and light or dark spots because each coat of metallic paint varies with air pressure, and gun speed and distance, and you "will" be sanding a few coats off before buffing.

Enamels came out to eliminate all that work, because they were glossy, (when applied correctly) right out of the gun. But, the down side was if you got any imperfections, dirt, lint, a run, you were stuck with it. It was not buffer friendly like lacquer was, but with lacquer's hardness and ability to be buffed, came it's brittleness as well.

Now came todays urethane enamel paints. The best of both worlds and then some. The base coat dries fast like lacquer, but you don't need a ton of coats because you won't be sanding and buffing it. The clear top coat is what gives you your shine, and when sprayed correctly, it lays down nice and flat. The advantage though, over that glossy enamel that you sprayed years ago is, next day you can buff any imperfection out of the urethane enamel clear.

Urethane paints have...
The speed of lacquer for the base.
The shine of enamel for the clear.
The buffability of lacquer for the clear. (but just much less labor intensive)
And last but not least, the most durable finish of them all.
They don’t call me Captain Krylon for nothing!(pointing at myself)
 

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Discussion Starter · #47 ·
:) Run Forrest Run!

The word "Forest" does not show up in the Camaro color chart. :D

Exterior Related - Camaro FAQ

In 69 it was: Fathom, Rallye or Frost
in 68 it was: Grecian, Rallye, Seafrost, British or Sequoia
in 67 it was: Mountain.

Strange how 67s had 2 turquoise's, but only 1 green, 68's had 1 turquoise, 2 teals and 5 greens! :)
That was auto correct, fathom green.
 

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Autocorrect knows Forest Green is better than Fathom Green


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