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My 69 camaro is having charging issues. I have found a short in the CLK-CRTSY-LTR circuit and removed the fuse and that seemed to solve the discharge according to volt meter, but the car still has a discharge somewhere when motor is running that wont show on volt meter. This has been an ongoing problem for a long time. I have replaced battery, converted over to new 3 wire alternaor with internal regulator to do away with external regulator and checked and cleaned grounds, etc. The battery fails to charge even though the hand held and installed volt meter say its charging at 14.2. The car starts fine on a fully charged battery, but after running for aprox 10 to 15 minutes the battery is pretty much flat I noticed another fellow posted a similiar issue here awhile back, but i dont think he posted if his problems were actually solved or not. I'm very much a novice when it comes to auto wiring and totally lost as to what the problem is or where else to look. Any help you guys could lend is greatly appreciated.
 

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The factory setup has a charging wire running from the Horn Relay to a junction block stud on the radiator support, just ahead of the battery. A wire runs from this block to the positive battery cable. Check that this lead is connected at both ends and is not shorting. There are fuseable links in the wire so test it for continuity. When measuring for charging voltage, test at the battery terminals to see if the voltage is actually getting to the battery, you want 14.7 V or very close to that.
 

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The car starts fine on a fully charged battery, but after running for aprox 10 to 15 minutes the battery is pretty much flat
If you have a 90 amp-hour battery and it goes dead in 15 minutes you must be drawing close to 360 amps, far more than any car takes to run or start.

Thanks, that never occured to me. I will check that out ASAP and get back to you.
Your car won't start if that wire is missing/unconnected unless there is another current path from the battery to the horn relay.
 

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The factory setup has a charging wire running from the Horn Relay to a junction block stud on the radiator support, just ahead of the battery. A wire runs from this block to the positive battery cable. Check that this lead is connected at both ends and is not shorting. There are fuseable links in the wire so test it for continuity. When measuring for charging voltage, test at the battery terminals to see if the voltage is actually getting to the battery, you want 14.7 V or very close to that.
What is the 3rd wire on that junction block for? Something aftermarket?
 

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Start from the beginning - Place a test light - it can be a 1156, 1157, or a 194, any bulb, and place it between a battery cable and battery post.
Depending upon present current demand, light bulb will be glowing brightly (short), or very dim glow, if aftermarket electronics is installed.

Original design of electrical system of the Camaro, no late model radios, no amplifiers, no ECM/PCM's, all doors shut - including glovebox, trunk closed, and headlight switch knob fully CCW, the test light should be out. You may need to view Camaro at night ensuring ALL courtesy lights and optional lights, are out. If original clock option is installed, a rhythmic surge of power will brighten the test lamp - solenoid powers up to wind the main spring.

If test lamp is glowing, start pulling a fuse one at a time and check bulb brightness.
The fuse killing the test lamp is the faulty circuit.
If all fuses are out and light still ON, then disconnect red power wire shown and two results will happen - 1. light out meaning short in red wire to fuse panel,
or 2. light on caused by an additional unfused circuit (aftermarket?) connected.

Once short is accounted for and accepted, measure across battery posts and as suggested, min 14 volts, should be measured - maybe 0.5 volt more on alternator BATT stud.
If battery post measurement is alot less than alt stud, then two red wires on horn relay buss bar need to be removed and wire brushed and stack them both on the same screw. Also, the junction block shown, same here, disassemble and wire brush, and assemble.
Note: sometimes, underneath the junction block, rust builds up between the stud and radiator support and becomes a drain path. Might want to remove the block and check - maybe put a piece of electrical tape on the stud for insulation.

Measure from alt BATT stud to positive battery post and should read less than 0.4 volts
Have you cleaned battery clamps?
Same for negative, post to engine ground, or better yet, alt case to negative post - chrome & paint do not conduct electricity very well.

Once you're done, you could externally charge battery overnight. Never hurts.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks to davidpozzi and Everett#230 for the helpful info. The lack of charging was due to a bad terminal on one of the wires attached to the horn relay. external/Internal corrosion had built up and caused resistance. Second by using the "test light" i discovered my short issue was due to the glove box light switch. After disconnecting the switch no more voltage drain. I was almost ready to call the rollback to take it to a local shop, so you guys saved me some money and lost sleep. Thanks again!
 

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Start from the beginning - Place a test light - it can be a 1156, 1157, or a 194, any bulb, and place it between a battery cable and battery post.
Depending upon present current demand, light bulb will be glowing brightly (short), or very dim glow, if aftermarket electronics is installed.

Original design of electrical system of the Camaro, no late model radios, no amplifiers, no ECM/PCM's, all doors shut - including glovebox, trunk closed, and headlight switch knob fully CCW, the test light should be out. You may need to view Camaro at night ensuring ALL courtesy lights and optional lights, are out. If original clock option is installed, a rhythmic surge of power will brighten the test lamp - solenoid powers up to wind the main spring.

If test lamp is glowing, start pulling a fuse one at a time and check bulb brightness.
The fuse killing the test lamp is the faulty circuit.
If all fuses are out and light still ON, then disconnect red power wire shown and two results will happen - 1. light out meaning short in red wire to fuse panel,
or 2. light on caused by an additional unfused circuit (aftermarket?) connected.

Once short is accounted for and accepted, measure across battery posts and as suggested, min 14 volts, should be measured - maybe 0.5 volt more on alternator BATT stud.
If battery post measurement is alot less than alt stud, then two red wires on horn relay buss bar need to be removed and wire brushed and stack them both on the same screw. Also, the junction block shown, same here, disassemble and wire brush, and assemble.
Note: sometimes, underneath the junction block, rust builds up between the stud and radiator support and becomes a drain path. Might want to remove the block and check - maybe put a piece of electrical tape on the stud for insulation.

Measure from alt BATT stud to positive battery post and should read less than 0.4 volts
Have you cleaned battery clamps?
Same for negative, post to engine ground, or better yet, alt case to negative post - chrome & paint do not conduct electricity very well.

Once you're done, you could externally charge battery overnight. Never hurts.
Thanks! Added this to my library. :beers:
 
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