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Discussion Starter #1
Ok...guys this may sound stupid but what exactly is a chevy 355...Also approx what kind of hp can a 355 with a blower put out...is 500-600 streetable hp obtainable with this set up....Thanks in advance

[This message has been edited by Badcaiman (edited 08-27-2001).]
 

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My 355 makes 437 rear wheel horsepower (around 500 flywheel hp) with an ATI Procharger pushing 9 PSI of boost thru a set of mildly ported L98 (Corvette) aluminum heads. So, the answer to your question is, yes, it is possible.

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Pearl blue & white 69 Camaro with supercharged 350, Tremec TKO, and 3.73 12-bolt

See my website updated 4/16/01 at:

www.geocities.com/gheatly
 

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A bored .03 over 350 would become a 355 in3(albeit slightly lower compression unless you shave the heads a tad. Did it to mine, with the cam from a 327, 375 HP - just got the carb straightened out, AWESOME!!
JJH
 

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You can find out the size of a motor by this formula:

Multiply:
BORE x STROKE x PI x # of CYLINDERS

by the way
PI alway = 3.14



[This message has been edited by Black 67 (edited 08-29-2001).]
 

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Lets do a Chevy 350

Multiply Below

Bore 4.00
Stroke 3.48
Pi 3.14
Cylinders: 8
----
349.67ci.

[This message has been edited by Black 67 (edited 08-29-2001).]
 

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Don't want to get into a mathamatical feud, but BORE X PI X STROKE X #CYL, only works for 4" bore. The correct formula is 1/2BORE X 1/2BORE X PI X STROKE X #CYL.
It works for 4" because 1/2 x 4 x 1/2 x 4 = 4.
 

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I don't want one either! I also do not claim to be a math whiz (not yet anyways but I am working on that) I was just trying to recall what was taught at the class that I took last semester out here.
The formula in our book is:

CID= pie x R(squared) x L x N

in which pie = 3.1416
R(squared) = bore radius or bore diameter/2
L = length of stroke
N = number of cylinders

This is were I have gotten my info.
"Like I said that is what I thought, I have been wrong before and will be again!"

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TONY
67 CAMARO R/S CLONE, 355/turbo 350, 200hp NOS,12 bolt,etc...

[This message has been edited by idoxlr8 (edited 08-28-2001).]
 

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to figure out the volume of a cylinder, you need diameter squared x pie x height. so that would equal bore squared (bore x bore) x 3.14 x stroke x number of cylinders.

[This message has been edited by lil_beast_67 (edited 08-28-2001).]
 

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Bore x Bore x stroke x .7854 x # of cylinders...works every time


Byt he way, overboring an engine, with all else the same, increases compression, not decreases it.

------------------
375hp 78 Chevy truck
77 Chevy Nova
95 Chevy Lumina 3.4L
and building a 78 Nova
 

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I may be the oldest ( or nearly the oldest) poster here, but way back in the old days I was taught that the area of a circle was calculated with the formula " Pi r2 ". Now if that is the area of a circle, then multiplying this formula buy the height of the cylinder will give the volume of the cylinder. That is "Pi r2 h ". This is the same as 3.14 x 1/2d x 1/2d x height. End of math class.

H-dog
 

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the formula Travis posted works in every case regardless of engine dimensions.

bore x bore x .7854 x stroke x # cylinders
 

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UNREAL:

Man I've been out of school for to long... Thanks for showing me why it only works with a 4 inch bore... I still can't believe I forgot the formula... Oh well..
 

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H-dog, pie r round, cornbread r square!!


My last year of college I had to take Chemistry 101 as a required class. In the first lab we were learning how to calculate volume (duh-pretty simple task after 4 years of engineering classes) and we each had to take an object from a box, measure it, and calculate its volume. I chose a cylinder because I was lazy and only wanted to measure 2 dimensions. But our worksheet had spaces for length, width, and height. I only filled in two: diameter and height, then calculated the volume. When I handed it in, the TA pointed out that one of the spaces was blank. I explained that I had a cylinder and only needed 2 dimensions to calculate the volume. She began to argue with me that it wasn't possible and I needed a third dimension to find the volume of a cylinder!!! And this girl was a grad student?? I realized on the first day that I wasn't going to get much out of that lab class. The second class she came over and apologized and agreed that I was right, you can find the volume of a cylinder with just diameter and height.


Another way of looking at displacement (sometimes it helps me to derive a formula so I understand where it's coming from):

Find the area of the cylinder:
(bore)x(bore)x(PI)/(4) or
(1/2 bore)x(1/2 bore)x(PI) (same thing different way)

Then multiply by height of cylinder (stroke):
(bore)x(bore)x(PI)/(4)x(stroke) or
(1/2 bore)x(1/2 bore)x(PI)x(stroke)

Then multiply by the number of cylinders to find the total displacement of the engine:
(bore)x(bore)x(PI)/(4)x(stroke)x(# cyl) or
(1/2 bore)x(1/2 bore)x(PI)x(stroke)x(# cyl)

Note that the first equation is the same as Travis' because PI/4 = .7854

[This message has been edited by No 'E' in Camaro (edited 08-29-2001).]
 

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My math teacher was right when he said "YOU WILL NEED THIS IN THE REAL WORLD" I just thought he was going mental... Of course he did walk up and down the halls with a leash in is hand, talking to an invisiable dog..
 
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