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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is there a way to coat a intake to keep it looking new? I'm not interested in painting it or polishing it I just want it to stay new looking for a long time. I take my car to shows and everybody has theirs either polished or painted and I just want something different. Thanks
Mike
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67 SS/RS 396 Camaro
 

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Treyman I had mine ceramic coated like they do on the headers. It cost around $90.00 and looks great. There is a picture on my website if you like to check it out. It takes a while to download because of all the pictures. If they don't all come up just hit refresh and they should appear. Air Born Coatings did mine. www.airborncoatings.com This is my first experience doing this so I don't know about longevity. From what I understand it will look great for a long time.

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Mike http://www.webwowser.com/cmrib/ribs
Frame Off Restoration
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
cmrib, Thanks for the info. I was on your web page earlier tonight. You have done a killer job on your car !!!!! Where did you get those valve covers and what did they cost? Thanks agian,
Mike
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67 SS/RS 396 Camaro
 

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Ceramic coating are designed to keep the heat in. Do you want to do that to a manifold. Would you do it to an AirGap?

Didn't think so. Engine temp runs at 200 or so. Underhood temps are lower. You want the manu dissipating to to the lower underhoods.

Unfortuntely it probably is good looking.

Not much can be done to the raw castings. Plain clear will yellow. Eastwoods products has something that might work. But I have no experience. Anodizing is also an option, but again, no experience.

Have heard powder coat does not hold up.

Local polisher charges $200-250. You wax it and then use Mothers.

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Gene C.
67 Chevelle SS 427/L88

[This message has been edited by 427TRI (edited 09-14-2000).]
 

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to 427TRI

Hello friend. I have worked with same broplem few times. first you cant anodize cast aluminium(all manifolds except sheet metal,are CAST)because there is too much lead in it.it would turn ugly black.
And what comes to heat iam sure the extra heat wich is coating might add wont be problem unless tryman is going to find out every extra horsepower out of hes car.But he shuld use good thermal insulation (spacer) between intake and carb.
hope this helped. Joni
 

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Joni, yes I'll concede that point. But polishing or a thin coat of black is still the best "functional" coating.
 

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427,

Polishing a manifold is one of the WORST ways to dissipate heat. A polished surface has a HORRIBLE emissivity. Emissivity is a surfaces ability to dissipate heat. Black surfaces, contrary to popular belief, have the BEST emissivity. Because of a high emissivity, black both absorbs and dissipates heat better than other colors. For an intake, you want poor emissivity on the bottom side, facing the hot oil, and a high emissivity on the top, so the manifold can dissipate the absorbed heat into the atmosphere. Therefore, best case, you want a polished (or coated) surface on the bottom and a black surface on top. Polishing the top surface does not let the manifold dissipate the heat it absorbs from the hot oil and water that touches it. Polishing may look good, but as far as function it will cause higher manifold temps.

In college we tested 3 solid aluminum cylinders. One was polished, one was anodized brown, and one was anodized black. We had a thermocouple mounted to each cylinder. We heated the cylinders with a bunsen burner to the same temps. We then shut off the burner, and began logging temperature data. The temperature of the black cylinder fell faster than the other two, with the polished cylinder finished WAY behind the other two.

Sorry for the length, but people's misconception with black surfaces have always confused me. For the same reason that black absorbs heat quickly, it also dissipates it quickly. As long as the temp of the surrounding area is less than the surface temp, a black surface is a good way to lower surface temps. Hope this helps. Take care

Shane

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69 SSRS Frame-off Resto
81 Z-28 377ci Drag Car
 

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Treyman,
I work for a powdercoating manufacturer.get the clear or a silver dust. I did mine in intake manifold silver ( snuck in back door) and all spills or dirt wipes off with a dry rag.also be sure to glass beed first.no oil residue can remain just like auto paint.

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My68Camaro
Doug G.
68 Camaro
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Teyman I purchased the valve covers from Jeff Johnston's Billet Fabrication in Simi Valley, CA 1-877-424-5538. They are pricey at $377.00 with engraving and shipping. On the other hand they are unique, great quality, and create a good seal. It takes a few weeks because you need to send him a draft copy of the design you want. Then he sets up a program with your design and engraves it to your specs. After the engraving they are then welded and delivered. I recently spoke with him and he said his busy season was winding down. So if your in the market for some new Billet Valve Covers now is the time. Good Luck!

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Mike http://www.webwowser.com/cmrib/ribs
69' SS/RS Frame Off Restoration
 

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Another idea is to glass beed the intake. It also looks nice. It doesn't have the polished look but it is clean. The only problem is that it will not hold that clean look for a long time. As for keeping the heat in with the ceramic coating. I feel a street car for cruising and having fun with will not be greatly effected.

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Mike http://www.webwowser.com/cmrib/ribs
69' SS/RS Frame Off Restoration
 

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69SSRS, thnx for the learnin'. Guess I'm still going to run the polished intake. Guess I shoulda had the heads brought up to a mirror finish, not the manifold!

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Gene C.
67 Chevelle SS 427/L88
 

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The intake and carb book by David Visard says to polish the manifold or do something to prevent it from absorbing heat from the engne compartment.

He says under full throttle the manifold is vaporising large amounts of fuel which cools the manifold interior. And you want to prevent underhood heat from going into the manifold.

Another alternative is having the manifold tumbled in a vibrator filled with ceramic pieces. It peens shut the pores of the aluminum, kind of like shot peening. The surface of the manifold looks a little pock marked like Noriega's face. Kind of like a hammertone paint surface.

Glass beading opens the pores a little, don't blast without clean media. If you do a manifold after doing something rusty, the rust will be blasted into the aluminum and cause corrosion.
David

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67 RS 327
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Has anyone used a ceramic high temp clear coat before? I just coated my Torker II after glass beading,and I don't know if this was a good idea or not?
 

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Your comment "The surface of the manifold looks a little pock marked like Noriega's face" made me laugh.......funny, yet very descriptive..............
 

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I've had alot of powder coating done to my car (pulleys, brackets, etc.) & now I want to coat my new Stealth manifold. The owner of the company that has done all the other work for me said the best way is to powdercoat then use clearcoat to seal the powdercoating. My car is only used for a few cruises & shows, so I don't think I should have a heating problem. I just don't want that ugly yellow color on the manifold when a little gas spills. Has anyone used the above method for their manifold? If so how does it look?
Thanks Guys
 

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I had a coating applied called "Chem Coat". It was done at an anodizer and seals the pores. It's a process, from what they told me, that preps the aluminum for painting. It gives the aluminum a slightly gold finish. A rag with some laquer thinner cleans up messes with no problem. Costs about $40. The only drawback is the gold hue.

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
It's final I bought a Air Gap Oval port intake and dropped it off to get powder coated clear. I also picked up a 750 Speed Demon and sub-frame connectors. God you have to love buying new parts. Thanks for all the input. Later, Mike
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67 SS/RS 396 Camaro
 

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BE VERY CAREFUL ABOUT THE BLASTING... some one blasted the alum intake and powdercoated mine before i got the car.... trouble was they didnt remove the oil valley from the intake they tried to tap[e it off and blast BAD MISTAKE sand was left inside when it was coated.... MISTAKE 2 they coated the bottom of the manifold.... heat and oil caused the coating to flake off into the oil

Think about this carefully
 

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I dont think heat would cause the powder to flake off as the ovens are usually set at about 400 F when powdercoating (used to work at a place that did it). Now as far as the oil and or Fuel having a destructive effect on the powder, I am not sure. Got me thinking as the bottom of my air gap is done.

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