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Discussion Starter #1
I was lucky enough to score a new set of wheels and tires off of Craigslist for my 69. I swapped out my 15x8 Rally's for a set of polished 15" Torque Thrusts.

I swapped wheels and tires when I got home from work yesterday. My front tire size changed from 215/65/15 to 225/60/15. Once I had swapped out the front wheels, I lowered the car down slowly to check for clearance issues. I noticed that my passenger side seemed to have more clearance than my driver's side. A lot of looking and feeling around led me to find that my passenger side coil spring is not seated in the upper perch area.

Has anyone ever experienced this? They are relatively new springs on a recent restoration. I did notice with my Rally wheels that the car tended to sit ever so slightly uneven but I chocked that up to it being a 48 year old car. But now that I found the issue, I want to set things straight.

So here's my question: I'd prefer to not pop out the lower ball joint as I don't want to destroy the dust boot. I'm thinking of removing the shock and fabricating an inside the coil spring tool out of a long bolt and a plate of steel. Hopefully I can pull the spring down enough to set it back in it's seat.

Any other suggestions or experiences. I've done front coil springs before but having one pop out of the seat is a first for me.

Thanks in advance.
 

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Autozone has that coil compressor you need, also you can unbolt the lower control arm bolts and drop, the arm down after you compress the spring then move you spring to correct spot. You will need a jack of some sort, im not sure what they are called, but they are on a tripod and the center of it spins to raise up the control arm to reinstall bolts.
 

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I think you would have a tough time twisting the spring without dropping the A-arm. First check the spring alignment at the top of the spring pocket. There is an inspection hole on the top of the subframe you can drop a screwdriver through to check alignment. If you can't get it through the hole, chances are your hitting the spring which means you are likely seated properly. This thread (post #4) shows the hole from the top view. It is generally forward of the top shock mount.

I attached a photo of the bottom view of the inspection hole looking up into the spring pocket. Just above the inspection hole, you will see where the spring stop. The spring should be seated 3/8" +/- 1/8" from the stop (Assembly Manual UPC 3-A4).

Here is a link showing an example of the spring spacer to provide a slight lift to the low side. Generally, your height will increase by double the thickness of the spacer (1.86 to 1 ratio).

BTW, if you have a big enough hammer, you may not even have to use a fork to separate the ball joint. All this is far to fresh in my mind. I spent half a day trying to seat my springs properly.

 

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Discussion Starter #7
I seem to have fixed the issue. I jacked the car up off the ground and removed the wheel. With the front suspension hanging, I removed the passenger side shock and with my jack under the lower control arm, I used a pry bar to pull the spring down slightly while my buddy used a 2x4 and a light sledge to tap the spring. There was a clear shift/pop as the top of the spring reseated itself in the perch.

I put the shock back in and the wheel on and lowered the car to the ground. It now sits level on both sides.

Thanks to everyone for their feedback.
 
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