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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have owned a numbers matching 1967 Camaro V8/327 + Powerglide convertible for over 15 years. It was in mint condition when I bought it, and I never bothered to look at the innards of the engine, since it always ran well enough for my simple cruising habits.

After a few years of not using it because of family issues, I have decided to check a few simple things before putting it back on the road.

A compression test shows all eight cylinders at between 142 and 150 p.s.i., which sounds like too much for a 8.5 compression ratio. Am I to assume that the engine was modified before I bought it, or is it just that my method is wrong?

Also, it has AC Delco R45S plugs, which look decent enough, but are all gapped at about 0.028 in. I find that definitely odd, but I don't want to fix anything that ain't broken.

What is the best and easily found current replacement for these plugs? Assuming I do not replace them, should I do anything at all with regard to the gap?

Thanks a lot!
 

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I have owned a numbers matching 1967 Camaro V8/327 + Powerglide convertible for over 15 years. It was in mint condition when I bought it, and I never bothered to look at the innards of the engine, since it always ran well enough for my simple cruising habits.

After a few years of not using it because of family issues, I have decided to check a few simple things before putting it back on the road.

A compression test shows all eight cylinders at between 142 and 150 p.s.i., which sounds like too much for a 8.5 compression ratio. Am I to assume that the engine was modified before I bought it, or is it just that my method is wrong?

Also, it has AC Delco R45S plugs, which look decent enough, but are all gapped at about 0.028 in. I find that definitely odd, but I don't want to fix anything that ain't broken.

What is the best and easily found current replacement for these plugs? Assuming I do not replace them, should I do anything at all with regard to the gap?

Thanks a lot!
That compression is ok you probably have a 210 to 250 horse 327 . That R45s is the standard work horse for most of those engines . The short gap is an old trick to give a thicker spark i am assuming you also have a points distributor and there's nothing wrong with that. The std. gap is .035 and that's also fine . there ,s two things that the G/M engineers did better than any other car company it was the window distributor and the Quadrajet four barrel carb both marvels of engineering. What you probably need to do is a major tune up. Clean the carb inside and out lubricate all linkage steam wash the motor then points plugs condenser rotor cap and a new set of good ignition wires air filter oil and filter change . it will run like a Rolls Royce. ears ago we used to do a minor tune up every year or 10k miles . that consisted of clean the carb and lubricate points plugs and condenser air filter if needed . Every third year it got every thing i named above Alex
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
That compression is ok you probably have a 210 to 250 horse 327 . That R45s is the standard work horse for most of those engines . The short gap is an old trick to give a thicker spark i am assuming you also have a points distributor and there's nothing wrong with that. The std. gap is .035 and that's also fine . there ,s two things that the G/M engineers did better than any other car company it was the window distributor and the Quadrajet four barrel carb both marvels of engineering. What you probably need to do is a major tune up. Clean the carb inside and out lubricate all linkage steam wash the motor then points plugs condenser rotor cap and a new set of good ignition wires air filter oil and filter change . it will run like a Rolls Royce. ears ago we used to do a minor tune up every year or 10k miles . that consisted of clean the carb and lubricate points plugs and condenser air filter if needed . Every third year it got every thing i named above Alex
Thank you very much for your input.

Yes, I have a points distributor, and it looks amazingly new inside and out, as do the points, ignition wires, etc. I took a sideways look at the cylinders with a borescope, and again everything checked out ok. One piston has a bit of carbon build up, nothing much, all others look factory fresh. Maybe the engine was rebuilt before I bought the car, I don't really know as it's a very low mileage car. The odometer showed 45K miles when I bought it, and the shape of the carpeting and upholstery supports the reading. I even found original factory tags stuck to the underside of the carpet.

The blemishes are the carb (dual barrel), which certainly needs to be looked into, and the transmission, that makes a serious sewing machine noise when under load. I will certainly follow your suggestions, for which I thank you again.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
After sitting, give the brakes/wheel cylinders a check too before hitting the road. My 02 cents
I just took the car to the mandatory DMV inspection, and I was surprised to see the braking measurements. The front disc brakes are extremely powerful, actually stronger than my Lexus daily driver. The rear drums are ok, but then I did have those rebuilt a few years ago, and they've seen little use.

I do have an issue with the front discs, because the calipers are not the original four piston type. I want to replace the brake lines, but I do not know what type fittings they use, unless I first take them apart. I will probably need help with that in the near future.

Thanks a lot for your input!
 

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Powerglides are durable! As a kid I wound out a column shift 68 in first and then went to hit second but went up to reverse:eek:. It was just an instant, as the car started to get crazy I slammed back down on the column and to my amazement, it behaved normal. I think the extra slop in there helped(y) U joints didn't even pop.
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Powerglides are durable! As a kid I wound out a column shift 68 in first and then went to hit second but went up to reverse:eek:. It was just an instant, as the car started to get crazy I slammed back down on the column and to my amazement, it behaved normal. I think the extra slop in there helped(y) U joints didn't even pop.
Ouch!
 

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Powerglides are durable! As a kid I wound out a column shift 68 in first and then went to hit second but went up to reverse:eek:. It was just an instant, as the car started to get crazy I slammed back down on the column and to my amazement, it behaved normal. I think the extra slop in there helped(y) U joints didn't even pop.
When I was a kid, 1 year or so old, my parents were driving the Camaro on a trip to upstate NY with me in a primitive car seat between the buckets. I took my little foot shod in a white leather baby shoe and kicked the shifter into reverse at 60 mph. Locked it up, spun the car off the road, scared the bleep out of my parents, and knocked 10 psi out of each back tire. The powerglide lived until I removed it to swap the 4spd. About 135k miles. Yeah, they are tough.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
When I was a kid, 1 year or so old, my parents were driving the Camaro on a trip to upstate NY with me in a primitive car seat between the buckets. I took my little foot shod in a white leather baby shoe and kicked the shifter into reverse at 60 mph. Locked it up, spun the car off the road, scared the bleep out of my parents, and knocked 10 psi out of each back tire. The powerglide lived until I removed it to swap the 4spd. About 135k miles. Yeah, they are tough.
You sure made GM proud, but did your parents ever talk to you again after that stunt? LOL
 

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I had a 64 El Camino w/ 327 PowerGlide (PG) that I towed a trailer with a 71 Vega drag car with. I decided I needed a little faster acceleration and put in a rebuilt TH350 and an extra cooler. Very shortly, the TH350 didn't want to play. Put the old PG back in and had no more problems.
 
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