Team Camaro Tech banner

1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
32,301 Posts
Copper is better as with nylon/plastic tubing will outgas later in life and will break.
You can get copper tubing from any hdwe store, but visit a HVAC supplier and use their 1/8 inch OD tubing as it has thinner wall thickness allowing for better quicker meter movement/action.
Once tubing is ran and hooked up, loosen fitting at gauge and allow oil to pass through for removing air in line.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
I just replaced my plastic tube with a copper line that I purchased at Jegs for my console gauge.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,095 Posts
Once tubing is ran and hooked up, loosen fitting at gauge and allow oil to pass through for removing air in line.

Since the gauge is measuring static pressure I wouldn't think it's necessary to remove the air in the line, if any, so the OP could skip that messy step. Any air bubbles will compress slightly under the relatively low pressure of the oil and will transmit the oil pressure as if they were not there. If instantaneous measurements of oil pressure were required from the gauge, then the expansion/contraction of the air bubbles in response to changing oil pressure might produce a small delay in instantaneous readings, but we're only looking at nominal oil pressures when we're driving. If the engine were to lose oil pressure the gauge would still show the loss quickly enough for one to take corrective action. Fact of the matter is, I probably only look at my console mounted gauge just periodically while driving since the gauge being mounted on the console I really have to take my eyes off the road and focus on it to read it (old eyes). The console is definitely not the best place for the oil pressure gauge. I'd rather have a warning light with and adjustable pressure threshold so it would light up if the pressure dropped below a preset level, but not zero.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 69Z28

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,095 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,674 Posts

Is the copper tubing the same OD as the GM or reproduction plastic/nylon tubing? Specs do indicate 1/8". A while back there was a discussion on CRG about the OEM fittings and what not, correct looking etc. I bought the factory looking kit with the nylon tubing. Just wondering if the kit I have will work with the copper tubing even though it's used with the nylon/plastic material. I want to say yes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,665 Posts
Copper will work-harden and eventually fail.
If you use the correct brass fittings and a firewall grommet, the nylon would be fine.
 

·
Premium Member
Brett - Leander, Texas 1969 SS396
Joined
·
1,336 Posts
Copper will work-harden and eventually fail.
If you use the correct brass fittings and a firewall grommet, the nylon would be fine.
Are you sure about that? "Work Harden" is exactly what it says and it would have to be "Worked" (Machined, hammered, etc in order for it to become hardened. Just being in a static position will not cause hardening. "Age Hardening" would be another form, but that takes heat-a lot of heat.

Brett.....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,665 Posts
Hard line connected to engine block. Engine vibrates and has range of movement. Line gets worked.
 

·
Premium Member
Brett - Leander, Texas 1969 SS396
Joined
·
1,336 Posts
This is a quote from a Google search;


"Upon bending, the copper hardens due to work hardening (also called strain hardening). Enough bending will make it impossible to return it to its original shape."

It would take a LOT of bending and a lot of movement for it to become a different molecular shape to where it would not go back to it's original shape, but it would not "Fail" in my opinion in the application it is being used in.

But, I have been know to be wrong on occasion...

Brett....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
571 Posts
I had a copper line break off at the engine. It can happen and when it does you have a steady stream of oil oiling down everything under the hood.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,435 Posts
Copper lines have been used for decades in the big truck and equipment industry. Those trucks usually drive over a a couple million miles in their lives. I have seen both copper and nylon tubing fail. Most of the failures I have seen are because of instillation errors. They both will work if installed correctly.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Everett#2390

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
32,301 Posts
True, one does not have to bleed the oil line, but a brand name gauge will not react as fast as it has to wait for the air in decompressing verses oil decompressing.
One would have a rag at the gauge end of line - it can be attached and loose fitting, say 1/4 turn unscrewed, a warm engine, and start engine and as oil is seen, shut off engine, tighten fitting, done.

The line at engine connection should have a min 1.5 inch service loop for vibration purposes.
This above all worked great for me in several gauge installs.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,137 Posts
Bleed the line if you want to, but it does nothing. Watch what happens to the oil in the line after you shut the engine off. A lot of the aftermarket gauge companies supply a clear or white nylon tubing with their oil pressure gauges. You can clearly see that the oil drains out of the line away from the gauge every time the engine is shut off. Turn the engine back on, and the tubing fills with oil all the way up to the gauge.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,665 Posts
GM began using copper-plated steel lines around 1960 for this application, until switching to nylon, which was what came from the factory on first gens.
But do what you want, your car, your choice.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,435 Posts
I agree Ev, use what you want. Or just say the hell with the line and go electric.🤔
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,097 Posts
One thing I noticed years ago was that copper shows the pressure spikes more as fluctuations when cold. I prefer factory lines. If you buy the factory replacement with the specific ferrules you won’t have any problems. Good luck.
 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
Top