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Discussion Starter #1
I just got a Aeroquip braided steel fuel line and have never worked with it before. I am trying to cut it to the proper length. I wrapped it with electrical tape and am using a 32 TPI blade on my hacksaw. I am not sure wether to saw fast or very carefully and slow. I tried one practice cut slow and the line was fraying pretty bad. Is there a better way to cut the line or any tricks to cut it clean. Any help appreciated.

Thanks,
Greg Hauser
 

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Try a cut off wheel on a die grinder,max RPM.Also use masking tape, won't melt as bad.They make a special blade for this purpose that can be used in a chop saw,that works the best.Hope this helps.

Brian Weil.

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They also make a special steel cutting blade that will fit your skill saw or table saw. Works very slick. Try a higher end hardware store such as Home Depot to buy
 

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Wrap tight with masking tape, clamp cut area 1 inch from vise jaws, use a fine tooth hacksaw, grind frayed wires down on a bench grinder or trim with clippers.

A fiber cut off wheel that burns through the hose is better, but I've done plenty with a hacksaw and worked fine.

Be sure to clean the junk out of the hoses.
David

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks guys. I used my cut-off wheel and it did a lot better. Merry Christmas everyone!!
 

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Greg, I have always had good luck using a sharp, blunt chisel. There are no frayed ends at all, very clean cut, you still need to wrap it with some sort of tape using this method. Hope this helps.

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My 69
 

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I wrap tightly with duct tape and use a (new) 32-tooth quality Nicholson hacksaw blade that I don't use for anything else. I also use a set of aluminum "soft-jaws" with magnets in them that fit in my vise that are shaped to match the hex fittings so I don't scar up the fittings while installing them (grips 4 sides of the fitting instead of just 2, and holds them straight). A small flat-bladed screwdriver is handy for "tucking in" strands as you start to insert the braided hose into the fitting.

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JohnZ
'69 Z28 Fathom Green
 
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