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Discussion Starter #1
Ok, it's been a long time since I posted anything on here. Been lurking a little but I haven't even had a chance to get on the site in a looong time.

I have a 97 Camaro with the 3.8l V6. I know, I know, not an LS anything. It's my commuter car. I bought it in Dec 07 with 56,000 miles on it. It now has 115,500. Like I said, commuter car.
Anyway, Over the past few months I have been having an odd problem with it. It keeps dying for no apparent reason, while I am driving. It is mostly while on the freeway, probably because that is where I spend the most amount of time.
I will be drive along and the engine will start sputtering and the voltage gauge drops to around 8 or 9. If I catching it in time I can drop it in neutral and hold the gas and it doesn't stall but if I don't... I have stalled out a few times while driving down the freeway. When it does stall, it takes a few tries before it will start up again. There is no one thing that I can pin down that causes it to happen. Its pretty random.
I have changed the fuel filter, I've ran some different injector cleaners thru it, I have tried different gas stations. Nothing seems to fully cure the problem. Someone I just talked to said it might be time to replace the injectors, not just clean them.
Any ideas?
 

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The volt gauge dropping that much is concerning. I'd get a digital volt meter, turn the key on and measure the battery voltage at the battery post. Compare the reading to the gauge. You should see about 12 volts with the key on engine off. Then have a helper crank it. The voltage should stay above 10 volts. With the engine running you should see about 14.5 volts. Does the instrument panel jive with the volt meter readings?

Even if the engine died, I wouldn't expect you to see less than 11.5 volts or so at the moment the issue happens which is why I recommended the DVM comparison.

A throttle position sensor that is failing can cause weird issues with engine stalling. Typically the portion of the TPS that sees the most activity (usually just above idle) can begin to drop out, confusing the ECM and causing a stall. You can diagnose a bad TPS by measuring the resistance between the center pin and one of the outer pins on the TPS sensor while you slowly open the throttle by hand. You should see a smooth change in resistance with no drop out or sudden jumps.
 

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Had the same problem on my 95. It was the alternator. Pull it and have it checked. It's easy to get off, and replacing it will take about 1 hr total.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I had wondered if that might be the culprit. I will do that one. If thats not it at least I can eliminate it from the suspects.
 
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