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Hi everyone, mods feel free to move this thread if needed.

So, I'm getting my 67 ready for resto. I've successfully pulled the interior (pretty easy). I'm reasonably handy, but haven't actually taken a whole car apart.

From what I've read here, first priority is take too many pics, and then take some more. Aside from that and notes, is there a good thread that basically goes over do's and don'ts? Like don't remove that set of bolts before you do that sort of thing.

I know that's really general, but I'd rather do it mostly correctly, as opposed to breaking stuff in the process.

Any parts removal helpful, for example, gas tank, brake lines, dash, etc.

As I mentioned, I did pull the interior, but actually haven't yet pulled the console or dash.

Thanks everyone,

Jeff
 

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I'm in the first phase of my project too, and can't agree more with picture, pictures, pictures and more pictures. Notes are extremely good as well so sounds like you are on the right track there.

Also when replacing with new parts if you are not sure what nuts/bolts/etc. you will be using again from the old parts just bag and tag them and set them aside where nobody else will touch them.

Other than what you are doing I'd say that the night before you are going to remove something, search the forums for topics about it, look at the assembly manual if you have a copy and even try YouTube and the image search on google. I've found sometimes the search function here is a little finicky like pretty much every other forum, so if you don't get results sometimes just try changing up your wording.
 

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#1 Get organized. Shelf unit dedicated to parts. If you put stuff in boxes label the boxes
#2 Don't throw anything away. Except for obvious items like carpet
#3 Bag and tag. I use painters tape and felt pen to mark larger items
#4 Pictures yes but organize the pictures in folders for ease of finding them later.\
#5 As you take things apart make a shopping list as you go of parts you want to replace.
 

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#1 Get organized. Shelf unit dedicated to parts. If you put stuff in boxes label the boxes
#2 Don't throw anything away. Except for obvious items like carpet
#3 Bag and tag. I use painters tape and felt pen to mark larger items
#4 Pictures yes but organize the pictures in folders for ease of finding them later.\
#5 As you take things apart make a shopping list as you go of parts you want to replace.
The only thing I could add is save everything. Even the carpet and headliner. There are measurements on that stuff you will be glad you have when installing the new stuff.

I also used 90% of the old fasteners because I was disappointed with the repop ones.

Roger
 

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^ excellent advice. There was a recent thread where a member had developed his own simple software to assist with cataloging restoration photos for ease of later reference. He shared it free, IIRC it was called 'Phoenix'. I downloaded it but haven't yet installed it, but will search for that thread and add the URL.
EDIT: here's the thread, turns out the software was not from a TC member but from another car forum:
http://www.camaros.net/forums/showthread.php?t=359457
 

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The only thing I could add is save everything. Even the carpet and headliner. There are measurements on that stuff you will be glad you have when installing the new stuff.

I also used 90% of the old fasteners because I was disappointed with the repop ones.

Roger
Jeff, I am doing a ground up restoration and currently in the midst of tear down. All of the above advise is excellent and comes from TC members who have lived the experience. I would add that an investment in Ziploc freezer bags in all sizes (http://ziploc.com/en/products/bags) will prove invaluable in keeping you organized. I put just about everything I can in them. I also purchased several clear storage bins which are very handy to organize and retrieve parts at a glance. Good luck with your project.

 

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Yep on all accounts, bag it, label it, picture it, label the picture, make notes, organize, keep everything including carpet for cutting new one and retain dimmer switch grommet as ones with new carpet are incorrect, obtain hardware kits from AMK to assist with newer washers, nuts, and much of the hardware, learn how to phosphate and re-use needed hardware, and have a lot of patience and $$$$$ in hand.
Have fun! :D:beers::thumbsup:
 

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Taking the gas tank out before removing leaf springs makes it easier. Taking fenders off with inner fenders still attached is easier. Main fuel lines are easier with the tank out and car up high enough to make it easier. Same with the brake lines. All the front brake line stuff is easier with the engine out and even the front sheetmetal. If you pull the subframe take a bunch of measurements to a fixed spot underneath and even "X" dimensions. It never hurts to over measure. AND... Did you get the point about pictures, bagging & tagging and proper storage.LOL. That is extremely important.
 

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I agree that bagging all original parts and fasteners is important, especially for someone who does not know anything about originality. Unfortunately, the original motor and tranny is lost in the OP's car, which reduces the car's value. A few incorrect finishes or fasteners will hardly affect the value of a car without the original drivetrain. I suppose the owner might like a flawless trailer queen rebuild without the born with driveline, but that is not what he stated in a previous thread. He wants to drive the car. Install all fasteners as they were prior to disassembly; provided you know what was original. Because the car has had work performed on it over the years, the OP must research all fasteners and parts that may no longer be original.

No reason to take measurements prior to subframe removal.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I agree that bagging all original parts and fasteners is important, especially for someone who does not know anything about originality. Unfortunately, the original motor and tranny is lost in the OP's car, which reduces the car's value. A few incorrect finishes or fasteners will hardly affect the value of a car without the original drivetrain. I suppose the owner might like a flawless trailer queen rebuild without the born with driveline, but that is not what he stated in a previous thread. He wants to drive the car. Install all fasteners as they were prior to disassembly; provided you know what was original. Because the car has had work performed on it over the years, the OP must research all fasteners and parts that may no longer be original.

No reason to take measurements prior to subframe removal.
Hi Scott,

Yes, I have no interest in a "trailer queen". For me, a car should be driven, or at least not have to worry about driving it. Strict originality, especially considering that the original motor and axle are not in the car is not an issue for me.

jeff
 

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Buy ton's of ziplock bags of all sizes. Buy several totes (pictured above). Keep everything organized. You will go back to these items (even though you won't be using them) several times for reference...pictures, pictures, pictures. Measure, measure and measure (and then take pictures of those measurements). Take tons of notes.
 

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The above suggestions are excellent advice. One thing that you did not mention is how deep are you going into the restoration your car. Make a plan Stan. Get a vision of how the finished car is going to look. Don't be too rigid in your vision. You will change your mind several times during the restoration. It is hard to give exact advice like take part A off before removing part B. Every restoration is different. For me, I broke the big project into hundreds of smaller projects. I started with the ones I felt most comfortable with and I was sure I could accomplish. As my knowledge and skills improved then I would tackle the more complicated projects.

Try to buy the parts in quantity to get a volume discount and save on shipping costs.

Consider making a spreadsheet that has a list of all the old and new parts. A spreadsheet might have a column that lists the locations of the parts. My old and new parts are in the attic, others are on shelves, the front end was bolted to a wall, the big stuff is in the junk pile on the side of my garage. Another words they are all over the place. It is hard for me to remember where my battery tray that I bought 2 years ago is located. The spreadsheet also helped me not to double order parts. I almost bought door lock knobs twice because I will add little things to an order to get over the threshold for a volume discount.

Most of all have fun. If you mess up and destroy something don't get all bent out of shape. Just fix it the next time you work on your car.

There are some very knowledgeable people on this forum. I just wish I knew what they have forgotten. They have helped me get through some parts of my project that I thought was impossible. You will figure out who they are as you progress in your restoration.
 
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