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Discussion Starter #1
I am installing fabricated valve covers that I will have to drill holes for the breather and PCV.

I know the PCV goes on the driver's side...but does it matter if it is installed at an angle? (ie horizontal on the rear or a 45 degree tilt towards the carb)

Same question with the breather...probably needs to be verticle but can I install it anywhere on the top of the valve cover with no issues?

Any pic of non-standard installs of these two things?

Thanks!
 

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On mine I did the opissite of the norm the breather on the pasinger side is towards the fron and the pcv on the drivers is towards the rear. The main thing of concern is that the rockers dont hit them.
Don't forget to install a baffle so it doesn't suck oil out of the cover!
 

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It shouldn't make a difference.
 

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I didn't read the OP's question as meaning which valve cover to install the PCV in, rather can it be installed on the side of the valve cover instead of the top. If I read correctly, my 2 cents would be that you can install it on the side provided you get clearance between the valves, rockers, etc. However, sucking oil into the PCV is a big problem that could be made worse by placement. If it were me, I'd leave it in the top to avoid sucking oil and ensure there is a baffel in place.
 

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The top isn't always a better place either. I think the location depends on whether oil is actually splashing on it.

Pull a valve cover right after the engine has run and see if the top is any drier than the sides.
I bet it is not.

I plumb mine in through the sides and although it's only run on a stand and several dyno pulls, there is no evidence of oil being sucked in.
 

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The correct factory location of the pcv valve on 1st gen Camaros anyways is on the driver side front.There are arguments re: the crank/ rotating assembly throwing oil up on/into the pass side of the eng/vavletrain.On older camaros the pcv usually ran from the front driver side to , more often than not the front of a Q jet (except Z-28 etc.; Holley). Curiosly the new GM crate engines put the pcv on the driver side rear. I personally have tried both ways and run mine on the driver side rear into the back of a Holley carb,this way it doesn't interfere with my throttle linkage. On either side (top or side of valve cover) it will work.You will have to watch for oil being sucked into the intake manifold and clearance to rockers. Proper baffling is crucial or you will suck oil into your manifold! I have a really nice set of unbaffled GM vale covers that I tried to use with baffled grommets and it didn't work. Baffled grommets are junk. My other 2 sets of valve covers have the factory style baffles and I have no more issues. If you can get your fabricated valve covers with baffles I would highly recomend them for street use.:thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Johnny5: I'm the OP here so I guess I can hijack my own thread...so here goes...

How did you get your Master Cylinder not to rust? Is that bare metal or is it coated?

So you gave up completely on baffled grommets and use factory bafflles now?
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I didn't read the OP's question as meaning which valve cover to install the PCV in, rather can it be installed on the side of the valve cover instead of the top. If I read correctly, my 2 cents would be that you can install it on the side provided you get clearance between the valves, rockers, etc. However, sucking oil into the PCV is a big problem that could be made worse by placement. If it were me, I'd leave it in the top to avoid sucking oil and ensure there is a baffel in place.
You're right--that is what I was asking--I wanted to try and leave the top clean and uncluttered if possible. Johnny5 says that baffled grommets won't work--is there no other option that will allow me to use fabricated covers with no baffle installed? Can I weld baffles in without screwing up the covers?
 

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Steve, isn't that why they put baffles in front of the PCV valve? To make sure you don't suck up oil? I would think that as long as you have room and a baffle is used, then the PCV can anywhere you want, as long as you don't have any interference issues. The PCV system is going to pull vapors out no matter if it's in the front, rear, or side. As long as your system is in good working order, baffle installed, it doesn't make a difference.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Steve, isn't that why they put baffles in front of the PCV valve? To make sure you don't suck up oil? I would think that as long as you have room and a baffle is used, then the PCV can anywhere you want, as long as you don't have any interference issues. The PCV system is going to pull vapors out no matter if it's in the front, rear, or side. As long as your system is in good working order, baffle installed, it doesn't make a difference.
If this is so, I could put my PCV on the rear of my cover (if I can avoid rocker interference)...

What do I do for baffles if I shouldn't use grommets?
 

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Johnny5: I'm the OP here so I guess I can hijack my own thread...so here goes...

How did you get your Master Cylinder not to rust? Is that bare metal or is it coated?

So you gave up completely on baffled grommets and use factory bafflles now?

Brentmc I know what You mean re: the master.The answer is, it's new.The booster is painted with cast blast.The car is only driven in the Summer and stored indoors. I didn't have any luck with baffled grommets I was sucking oil so, I dont use those unbaffled covers with the baffled grommets anymore. I think Wysco makes a breather for fabricated valve covers that didn't come with breather holes, but I don't know if they work or not.You will just have to drill holes. You can find them @ Jegs under- dress up- valve covers -breathers :thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Thanks--my car is garaged and nice weather driven and I have clear coated the MC but it still gets rust in the corners. I didn't want to have to paint it buy may just do so....
 

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The top isn't always a better place either. I think the location depends on whether oil is actually splashing on it.

Pull a valve cover right after the engine has run and see if the top is any drier than the sides.
I bet it is not.

I plumb mine in through the sides and although it's only run on a stand and several dyno pulls, there is no evidence of oil being sucked in.
Steve. Question:
Why two PCV valves????:confused: The acronym stands for Positive Crankcase Ventilation. How do you achieve Positive movement of air OUT of the crankcase with a PCV valve in each cover? I would think that only air that's in the covers between the valve and vents would move. Your pan must be vented too????:confused::confused:
 

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Because I was intending to run the crancase at a vacuum. I wasn't interested in giving it any "fresh air"!
I've ran it that way for years before this recent freshen up.

Anyway, I have only just reconsidered my approach. Not to say that my idea of 2 PCVs didn't work, as I believe it did. I was concerned about zero manifold vacuum at WOT when that's when blow-by is at it's maximum..
-theoretically.
So I guess it may have been possible to have the crankcase at atmospheric or slightly above during WOT.
Without a vacuum gauge tapped into it, I guess I'll never know for sure.

Here is what I have done now.
 

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I hate those damn theories!
Vacuum in the crankcase is a good thing. Those crank-driven pumps are worth measurable horses. But they're pumps that work full time. Not engine manifold vacuum. Theories, damn theories!:eek:
 

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Well Fred, having one PCV and a vent is an established theory that isn't necessarily the best one either. :)
I believe it's main objective is an environmental one, which is to allow blow-by and oil fumes to be readily consumed by the engine.
It also allows pressures in the crankcase to remain very close to atmospheric.

By replacing the vent with another PCV valve, I did indead run the crankcase at a vacuum, which is good for power and minimizes possible oil leaks too. The air in the crankcase may have been full of blow-by and fumes, but do I care? Frequent oil changes with quality oil, no problem.

Like I said, it's only at WOT when manifold vacuum gets close to atmospheric that it will stop pulling as much air out. There still may be a vacuum present during those times. Probably more so, than the way I have it now.
 

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Baffles should be able to be welded to the valve covers. If you use a low amp tig weld you should be safe and not cause any cover damage.
 
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