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Discussion Starter #1
Hey Guys, I am going to run a number of wires into the door and am looking for some nice door jamb wiring boots. I have seen the stock type and that is not what I am after. Does anyone know of a source for some nice ones that are about 1-1 1/2" diameter? Again, no need to be stock looking. Something like modern cars would have. Thanks.
 

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I was thinking about that. What kills me is my friend and I put in some boots in a '68 truck I was building about 5 years ago. They were perfect. Now my friend can not figure out where he got them and can't find them in any catalogs. I was hoping someone had done something like this and had a source. Oh well, looks like the junk yard it is, unless someone comes up with an idea.
 

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Bry68,

Unfortunately, I/we are unsure if the boots will work for sure. Like so many options, you have to buy one, dry fit it to make sure it works and then go forward with the install.

I am ready to try them but I was hoping that someone would chime in that has had some success (or failure) with these types of fittings.

As for the stainless ones that you pointed out. I saw those as well and thought that they would look better but the description says... "These loops are very difficult to mount in later vehicles with hinges in the door jamb."

That was enough to scare me away! I'm all about simple!
 

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Looks like a piece of rubber tubing and a couple of fat grommets. :rolleyes:
 

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So I found out some good info for putting in door jamb wiring boots. If you feel around on the sheet metal in the door jamb, you will find a couple of dimples (one on the door side, and one on the car side). These are where the factory installed their boots for electric windows. I drilled holes where the dimples are, put in a homemade boot, and the boot hardly even moves, it just pivots a little bit. If you open the door all the way, it might move a little.

The way that I made my boots is by first getting some 1/2" poly tubing, the kind used in home plumbing. I think it was about 17 cents a foot. I bought a foot and cut it in half. I then made threads (with a drill and tap kit) on each end, and threaded nuts on each end. Next, I bought four 1/2" inside diameter grommets. I drilled 11/16" holes on the dimples (in the sheet metal) and put the grommets in. I lubed up the tubing and grommets with some brake lube (the label says it won't break down rubber, won't move, is waterproof, etc.). I put the tubing through the gromets and threaded on the nuts inside the door panel and inside the passenger compartment. One hard part was taking off the kick panels to drill the holes: I pulled from the firewall side (on my 68) and they came off a lot easier. I also had to take out the e-brake. It looks like you can probably fit 6-8 18 gauges wires through it (without the connectors on).

The A1 electric part that I mentioned in my previous post looks like it would work very easily if you drilled 3/4" holes on the dimples. I think there is more than enough room.
 

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As Bry68 stated there arwe some dimples to locate the center of the holes. Below is a shot of the ones like from A1 (mine are from a supplier of mine for car stereo parts/Aamp of America).

http://community.webshots.com/photo/93042429/111050427JkjZoq

I would rather see an installation with a type that seals against allowing water to get into the kick panel are or the doors. The stainless steel looking spring models are nothing more than the springs you slide over tubing you use in the house under a sink to bend it so it doesn't kink and these if installed in a door do look nice however the water that does get in that area of the door has an easy way to get inside of the car. I tried using the spring type in an installation on a 56 chevrolet and ended up removing them and making my own. On that car the slot in the jamb even though open is protected as the door weatherstrip is to the outside of that and when the door is closed no water can get to it or into the interior.

http://community.webshots.com/album/113373496zNgIvF

On the installation of any of them I would remove the door to make drilling the holes a lot easier (it also gives you the chance to replace the door hinge bushings if needed) and after drilling the holes you can paint the edges so rust doesn't form on the bare metal.

Jim
 
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