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1969 Camaro SS350
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My 69 Camaro drivers side door has what I believe is called a door twist? Bottom part of door sticks out slightly, maybe just under1/4 inch. All other door gaps are good and door fits flush were it should. Read on internet some possible ways to fix but they sound kind of sketchy. Door is painted and don't want to screw up existing finish. Any sure fire ideas? A lot of the ideas on internet are along this line, of blocking top of door and pushing or pulling in at bottom to correct twist. I'll see if I can get a picture posted later tonight showing what I'm talking about.
 

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My door had a tear in the inner shell to introduce the flex. I think it could have been welded but when I had the bodywork done Henry found a donor door instead.
 

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The door twist is not uncommon. Factory gaps were not as much of a concern when these cars were built. If it's painted I would probably leave it alone if the door has any bodywork . It should have been addressed before bodywork was even started.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Picture of door were won’t line up flush
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The door twist is not uncommon. Factory gaps were not as much of a concern when these cars were built. If it's painted I would probably leave it alone if the door has any bodywork . It should have been addressed before bodywork was even started.
I agree that it should have been done back when it was painted. Paint and body work were done around 15-20 years ago. I purchased the car about 4 years ago and have been slowly repairing all the shoddy work that has been done over the years. This door issue is one of the few things that has been bothering me since purchase. Trying to see if there is any way to straighten it without ruining anything. Paint and body work being very costly I'll have to leave it as is if repairing will cause any damage.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The door twist is not uncommon. Factory gaps were not as much of a concern when these cars were built. If it's painted I would probably leave it alone if the door has any bodywork . It should have been addressed before bodywork was even started.
Also this door is off another Camaro and not original to car. Car original paint fathom green, this door was off a brown car at one time.
 

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I dunno. Looks like hinge and striker adjustment would take care of most, if not all, of that. Maybe a slight adjustment of the fender after the door is aligned.

Don
 

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It looks like it's proud at the top too. Like Don said, it could possibly be adjusted to make it a little bit better. It could also be that the door is fine, and the quarter is off. I set all of my sheet metal from the door. Starting with perfect henges.
 

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1968 Camaro Convertible 327 210hp
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You may be able to adjust it on the hinge. You could try loosening the bolts on the door side of the hinge and seeing if the bottom will rotate in. Loosen all but one bolt on each hinge and see if the door will rotate. It will likely chip the paint around the bolts and base of hinge. Mask off edges of door, fender and quarter with tape first. I would also have a helper handy to make it easier.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I've rebuilt door hinges. Tried numerous adjustments on hinges and door striker and always end up back with were its at now. Took it to a local restoration shop and guy there gave it his best. Still not where I would like to see it. Quarter panel has been replaced. So that's an area that is out of my control if installed wrong. So twist or quarter panel are the most likely culprits? Going to check striker and see if it can be pulled in a little more. Fender to door gap is good. maybe a little tight. Bottom door gap looks OK. From body line up gap looks fine on door. Door closes good with just that tweak out at bottom.
 

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I've rebuilt door hinges. Tried numerous adjustments on hinges and door striker and always end up back with were its at now. Took it to a local restoration shop and guy there gave it his best. Still not where I would like to see it. Quarter panel has been replaced. So that's an area that is out of my control if installed wrong. So twist or quarter panel are the most likely culprits? Going to check striker and see if it can be pulled in a little more. Fender to door gap is good. maybe a little tight. Bottom door gap looks OK. From body line up gap looks fine on door. Door closes good with just that tweak out at bottom.
Adjust it without the striker first. When it is right then put in and adjust striker.
 

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Hinge and striker alignment should fix most of that. Try another “restoration” shop….

Don
 

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I am not a professional body guy. This is just my opinion. IF the fender installed correctly and is perfectly aligned with the rocker, you cannot take that out with a hinge adjustment. If you move it in at the front, then the front doesn't line up with the fender and rocker.

I had a door just like that, also on the driver's side. Car had never been hit, and had the original quarters. Didn't matter how I adjusted hinges and striker, it stuck out about 3/16 of an inch at the bottom. It was obvious that I had to twist it back into shape. Car was still in primer, so wasn't as scary as it would be for you. I DON'T KNOW THAT I WOULD RISK IT ON A PAINTED CAR.

My car had no engine or trans, and no interior installed when I fixed it. Looked back through old photos and I cannot find any pics of the procedure I used. Will describe it the best I can. Pros and guys with frame machines will likely laugh their a$$es off. So, I gave you a good laugh. You are welcome. Remember, laughter is good for the bones.

I would not attempt this on a door that had any appreciable amount of filler. This one had maybe a teaspoon. What was there was so thin it was translucent. I attached a six foot long 2x6 vertically to the inside door frame, with four foot of that being above the door. If I remember correctly I wrapped a ratchet strap around the door and under the car back through the car to hold the door in place so it wouldn't open. It has been 10 plus years, so some of this is fuzzy memories. The idea was to brace the door so it wouldn't open; then pull on the top of the 2x6.

I was able to generate enough leverage that both passenger side wheels were slightly off the ground. Obviously would not have done that Took everything off and shut the door. It fit perfectly, and still does today.
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I am not a professional body guy. This is just my opinion. IF the fender installed correctly and is perfectly aligned with the rocker, you cannot take that out with a hinge adjustment. If you move it in at the front, then the front doesn't line up with the fender and rocker.
I respectfully disagree. I’m no rocket scientist but I’ve built quite a few first gens. The key here to align the door to the quarter and rocker by adjusting the door side of both hinges. Once that is done the fender is aligned to the door. That’s the way it is done. Rotate the door about the striker until it’s aligned with the quarter and rocker. Then align the fender. It’s really that simple. Will it be perfect? Maybe not but it will be a heck of a lot better than that pic. I will also say to focus on the door to quarter alignment since that is the most visible. Door to rocker alignment is much less noticeable.

Don
 
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I managed to get door off to rebuild hinges by myself without damaging paint, Worked on adjusting door without damaging. Off work tomorrow and am going to see if I can do anything to improve alignment.
 

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I respectfully disagree. I’m no rocket scientist but I’ve built quite a few first gens. The key here to align the door to the quarter and rocker by adjusting the door side of both hinges. Once that is done the fender is aligned to the door. That’s the way it is done. Rotate the door about the striker until it’s aligned with the quarter and rocker. Then align the fender. It’s really that simple. Will it be perfect? Maybe not but it will be a heck of a lot better than that pic. I will also say to focus on the door to quarter alignment since that is the most visible. Door to rocker alignment is much less noticeable.

Don
Don: Can't say that I disagree with anything you said. I have a lot of respect for your work, and your opinion.

Was just giving my opinion and sharing my experience. Again, I don't know that I would have risked MY procedure if the car had already been painted. Being in primer made the decision easy for me. I have a lot of respect for your work.

On my car, I could find no way to make it fit to my standards without taking the twist out of the door. I wasn't willing to live with the front of the door AND the fender being misaligned with the rocker. It may very well be that it was slightly misaligned from new. Some would say that by correcting it, I "over restored" the car. I am fine with that as well. Being black, EVERY flaw shows in the right light. I take great pleasure in looking at the car down the sides and seeing how well everything lines up. Still not perfect; probably better then new.

There were two other factory issues I could not live with. The leaded seam where the roof panel and quarter panel meet was pretty wavy from the factory. If the car were white or silver or yellow, no one would ever notice. Again, on a black car I wasn't willing to live with it. So, I re-leaded that area on both sides. Also, there was no black paint on the bottom half inch of most of the tail panel; just primer. I did not replicate that sloppy work (I believe the painter just was too lazy that day to bend down far enough to get full coverage) from the factory when I painted it. Is it over restored? Maybe. Do I care? Not one bit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Finally made it back with some results. Issue now is rubber seal on door makes closing it hard. Almost have to slam for latching. Push striker out to loosen contact with seal and increase in pull out at bottom of door. Gaps seem OK. Would be happy with results if closing wasn't so hard. Anything I can do with rubber seal?
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Metro seals are the softest I have found. Soft Seal is the worst in my experience…

Don
 

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Hard to tell in pic but it looks like it could come out a skooch on the upper hinge.

Don
 
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