Team Camaro Tech banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
396 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
What is a double flair on brake lines. Is there such thing as a single flair and is it what you get with the tool that holds the line and then screws in a wedge looking thing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,920 Posts
Rick,
a single flare is made with a standard flaring tool, block and the wedge shaped tool you describe. It simply drives down into the tube and makes a nice 45 or 37 degree flare depending on what tool you're using. The double flare folds the tube down inside of itself while making the same flare angles. It is much safer and much stronger than the single flare. That's why it is used on brake lines and fuel lines. It is much less prone to cracking. Snap-On and many auto parts stores sells a kit for double flaring tubes. I paid about 50 bucks from Snap-On for mine and it has paid for itself many times over because I make all my own brake and fuel lines.

If you are using AN aluminun or steel fittings don't make the mistake that almost everybody makes. Get the right tool to make the right angle of flare you'll need. AN and automotive SAE fittings use different flare angles and are not interchangable although many people do mix them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,721 Posts
SY1 has is right. Just to add a little more info, you do not need to double flare stainless tube. It will crack. Also, aluminum tubing over 3/8" does not require double flaring.

Carroll Smith wrote a book "Nuts, bolts, fasteners, and Plumbing" that is a great laymans guide to high-peformance fasteners and plumbing.

------------------
The Red Beast http://www.geocities.com/casanoc
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
503 Posts
CarlC....that IS an excellent reference book...I'd recomend that one to anybody that does any fabricating, wether<sp> it's flairing lines or simply changing a bolt...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,920 Posts
CarlC,
You're right about the stainless. boy is that stuff hard to work with. On some aircraft thrust reversers Dee Howard uses flare fittings and stainless lines. Hard to believe in this day and age a major aircraft modification center would use flare fittings on a 3000 psi system, but they did. Cracks resulting in leaks are common with these lines. All the thrust reversers I have seen other than these used MS fittings and never leak, or crack.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top