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Hi all, I am thinking of starting in on my first engine project. I have a 327 that has been sitting in my garage for the last five years. It came along with a camaro I bought. The guy who sold it to me said the engine was running when he pulled it. I have put in the time reading all the literature I can find on rebuilding a chevy small block and I feel pretty confident about it. I guess what I am wondering about is, if my goal is to end up with a stock 327, how much/what should I do. Should I tear the whole thing apart (like the books say), have the block tanked and checked and then reassemble with some new stock parts? If everything checks out okay, what should I be looking to replace at a minimum. This is going to be going into a daily driver.
Thanks,
Mike
 

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Do the block numbers match your car? If yes, I would recommend a full rebuild, you should be able to reuse the connecting rods, lifters, heads and crank(as long as it's not too worn). If it's not #'s matching then I would just buy a crate.
 

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dont reuse lifters!!!they wear with the cam...break in a new cam with a new set of lifters...once the old lifters are hardened, they will tear up a soft, untempered(not broken in) cam...i would think sisce they stopped building the 327 in 69??? (not sure of the yr) you will probably want to do a fairly indepth rebuild...tolerances werent real good in the 60`s, so expect to spend money on machine work too...a crate motor would definately be cheaper, but if the 327 is the 1 you want, bank twice what you thought you were gonna spend, and you`ll be just shy of haveing enough money...lol...i`d think 2700 would get you there...
 

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dont reuse lifters!!!they wear with the cam...break in a new cam with a new set of lifters...once the old lifters are hardened, they will tear up a soft, untempered(not broken in) cam...i would think sisce they stopped building the 327 in 69??? (not sure of the yr) you will probably want to do a fairly indepth rebuild...tolerances werent real good in the 60`s, so expect to spend money on machine work too...a crate motor would definately be cheaper, but if the 327 is the 1 you want, bank twice what you thought you were gonna spend, and you`ll be just shy of haveing enough money...lol...i`d think 2700 would get you there...
sorry sorry sorry I was typing quickly at work - meant rockers not lifters
 

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Get up close and personel.What good does it due to read about rebuilding a SBC then order a crate?Use your new found knowledge to plan your rebuild and then DO IT.The satisfaction value is second to none..and you can compare specs with others that dare to build as compared to just purchase.:thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I was planning on doing the rebuild myself for the experience and to put what looks like a good engine to good use. I am a little scared by the cost though. I hadn't budgetted that much. On my last project I went the route of the crate engine and have to say it was easy. If I do end up doing the rebuild, can anyone recommend a good shop in or around the New Haven county (CT) area that I can take the block to? Is the machining going to be expensive? I guess I have to also price out the parts.
Thanks again,
Mike
 

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rebuilding engines is fun. I've been doing them since I was 15.
First step is to clean up the outside and take her apart. Tag and mark everything. Wear parts that will n ot be replaced have to stay together (a rocker and it's ball, a lifter and it. lobe, a main cap and it's journal, etc.)
Once she's apart start checking and measuring, then decide "how much" of a rebuild you need to do.
 

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TIP: when you take apart the engine - the head bolts will have what looks like old thread lock on them DO NOT REMOVE OR CLEAN THAT OFF!!! It's actually an old timer sealer that was used at the factory to make up for tolerances by sealing the bolts for leaks - ive seen quite a few that after cleaning them off leak up through the bolts on reinstallation.
 

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Ok - my bad, and I will be the first one to call bull$h*t on myself. I went to lunch today with Rich(my engine builder) and mentioned this discussion - he wound up smacking me. He never said not to completely clean the bolts - he said to not remove the last bit from the shaft at the thread line. He does say to soak/wire brush and inspect the threads and if clean reuse. He stated that original bolts from the 60/70's are grade 12 and with a std 4lb over torque they can safely be reused upto 3 times. He also uses the Permatex Aviation Sealer on the threads as well as he has a specail tool he runs down the bolt holes and applies sealer to the inner threads and such.
 
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