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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys... I want to start by stating that I have searched the threads and done a ton of reading. Now I just want to make sure I have it right!

This weekend I plan to start up my 67 for the first time since I started this whole process. I am looking for some advice and “heads ups” on getting it going.

I have never done this before so I am a little nervous about it.

Setup:
67 Camaro
327 bored 0.030” with a comp cam kit
Pertronix Ignitor II electronic ignition
Distributor is out of car
Engine drained of coolant & oil
New radiator & transmission
All new wiring harnesses from AAW
New fuel tank and lines

This is my plan:
Install a new oil filter
Fill fluids, fuel, oil, coolant, & steering - (will it matter that there is no coolant in the engine until the thermostat opens? If so how do I get it in there without drilling a hole in my stat?)
Remove the plugs and squirt some oil in the cylinders
Prime the oil pump - (can I turn the engine by hand to do this or do I need the oil pump primer tool?)
Find TDC - (not sure the best way to do this, bump the starter w/ my finger over #1?)
Install the distributor
Try to start the engine
After engine starts set timing - (and add coolant?)

Does that sound about right? Or am I missing a whole bunch of stuff?! ... Sorry for the long post, and thanks in advance for your help!
 

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I would prime oil pump with prime tool and drill first, drop dist in, find tdc at #1cly, blows finger off plug hole. (if I remember correctly that rotor is actually point at # 6 wire?) Anyone can correct me here.

Not gonna hurt to put small whole in t-stat, I have two 1/8" on each side. Fill radiator and to recheck all firing order. If you have a flat tappet cam, don't want to be doing too much grinding with out much oil on cam lobes. Roller is different.

If you know how, pre-set initial timing on balancer to 10-15° btdc, pull cap off and see where rotor is, if its at #1,or close then you should be ready to fire. If rotor is not at that point, lift up dist enough to reclock, keeping oil pump shaft on dist.
I would run at fast idle 10 min or so, until you can see oil pressure and water moving in the radiator, shut down if you see anything thing happening that shouldn't .
What did I miss?
 

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Result of not filling with coolant:
1. Water pump destroyed before engine warms up.
2. thermostat will open right after engine seizes from over heating.
(hint: fill it with coolant.)
 

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Discussion Starter #4
What is the best way to get coolant into the engine? Would it be sufficient to just remove the stat and dump it in?
 

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Here is what I have always done to cold fill a block after drain Aaron.

Remove thermostat housing from top of the block but leave the housing attached to the upper radiator hose.
Open radiator and fill to the point fluid hits the top of the block.
Install t-stat and housing.
Top radiator off and start with cap off radiator.
Let it reach temp and t-stat opens, and add fluid as needed to bring it up to the HOT line.
 

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Just remove the thermostat housing and thermostat and pour antifreeze in until it's full. Reinstall thermostat and housing and finish topping radiator off. Install the oil filter and fill with oil. Fill all the rest of the fluids too. Prime the oil pump with a oil pump primer tool and electric drill. Remove valve covers so you can see the oil at the top of engine. Bring #1 cylinder up on TDC and install the distributor. Start the engine. Once you have the engine running set the idle around 850 rpms and timing at 16* initial and 36* total with vacuum hose disconnect and plugged. Take it for a ride.
 

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Install the oil filter and fill with oil
. Might want to fill the filter before installing. Also is this a new start after a rebuild? Cam break in is more than 10 minutes unless it is a roller.
 

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...too bad you're not a lil closer (Minot)

I've done this. Even recently.
Just hook up all the hoses and fill radiator to top. You'll hear it bubble and trickle in and the water level will go down until it really is full and wont take any more water. So, to answer your question, no just fill it up.

Yes, I'd use an oil primer tool if you have one. The're cheap enough. Or, you can sacrifice a long screwdriver by cutting off handle and chucking into drill and engaging the oil pump down through the dist hole to prime engine. Make sure you see oil come through the rockers. then that'll be enough.

Find TDC on #1 cylinder on the firing stroke. Then back it up a little like 15 degrees before TDC, then stab in distributor. This should get you pretty close timing wise, enough to run it for the 20 to 30 minutes for the cam to break in.

Doubly make sure hoses are tight. Belts too.
Oil in it. Filter too.
If carb is completely dry of gas. Trickle gas in the vent tube to fill bowl enough to get engine started by avoiding cranking engine too long. Engine must fire up quickly for oil to circulate quickly for lube to cam lobe break in. Do not grind on the starter or rely on starter to fill carb with gas. Fill carb a little with gas first.
As soon as it fires up, immediately! bring to at least 1800-plus rpms! I know this sounds spooky, but cam must have oil quickly for sucessful break in. Not joking. do not idle it until break in is done. 20 minutes minimum. Yes it'll bug the neighbors if open headers, (hehe) but consider engine as junk and re-doing it by not following proper break in due to insufficient cam lubrication during break in. (I gave my neighbor a Starbucks gift card afterwards) She was nice about it.

Now, the above is if you are running a flat tappet type of cam. If its a roller type, its much less crucial for the 1800rpms for 20 minutes thing.

Follow what you've been reading, and it'll be alright. I was nervous too, but all went well. Was exciting. Always is on a fresh build.
 

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Use an oil pump priming tool that has a collar on the shaft. You'll have trouble oiling both cylinder banks if you use a priming tool without that collar. This is hard on drills so use a good one. You will need to rotate the motor during priming to get oil out of every pushrod. Once it's primed, try to get as close as possible to your desired initial timing. Find TDC and then back it up to your desired timing BTDC. Then drop your distributor with the rotor pointing at #1. Dropping in the distributor will be a pain because you will have to turn the oil pump to properly clock the pump shaft at the desired timing setting. Take your time and you'll get it. I like to put a mark on the visible end of the priming tool which shows how the slot in the pump shaft is clocked.
 

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If it's a new or rebuilt motor then just add water in case you have internal water leaks. Once broke in dump water & oil/filter. Then open rad drain and both engine block coolant bolts and let it all drain out. Then add sealant to the drain bolt threads, close drain and mix 50/50 mix of water/antifreeze or buy the ready mix and add to rad.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
The engine rebuild was completed before I got the car. There are probably ~200mi on it since then. But you know how this process goes... the engine was out of the car for probably 5 years while I did the rest of the work. I have had it in the car for about a year now but have not started it. (6 years total)

The cam the PO put in is a flat tappet cam, but it has already been broken in.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks for the help you guys!! I was able to get her fired up this weekend and it all went really smooth. In fact I was surprised how well it went.

I am so fired up right now!! Its alive again!
 

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Good deal. :thumbsup:
 
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