Team Camaro Tech banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
145 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
If an older flywheel was used on a newer externally balanced crate engine how bad would the vibration feel? Would the vibration be felt across the rpm band or a certain rpms? I'm trying to track down a vibration that seems to be engine related. Thanks!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,167 Posts
I dont think you can even get an older flywheel to fit correctly as the older has a 3.50" crank flange snout and the newer has a 3". You will have a heck of a time lining it up. Most all older motors were internal balanced. Which motors are you talking about?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
145 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
The engine in it now is a 350 crate (CC code). It has the one-piece rear seal and should be externally balanced. The original engine in the 68 was a V8 (327).
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
32,466 Posts
As Don suggested, one-piece rear seal require a different bolt pattern than a two-piece seal.

If one were to have adapted and mixed the two, the vibration would be such one would not be able to read the speedo. The engine will not last long under this condition, rear main bearing will be wiped out.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,375 Posts
And to add to what Tim said,:D (don't yell at me Tim!;)) also check for crossfire. That's one plug wire firing the adjoining wire because the wires are next to each other for a substantial distance. (I think the effect is caused by induction) I forget which wires are the culprit on a Chevy, 7&5???? Hey, it was an Autoshop lesson in 1964 so I'm a little foggy. Besides, it was the 60's!:thumbsup: Anyway, it's best to keep 'em apart and not parallel.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top