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Looking for recommendations...


I am buliding a brand new 24x24 Pole garage/workshop. It will be insulated, heated and cooled.


Since the building is new, it will have newly poured concrete as well.



I'd like a high gloss finish, but also do not want it to be too slick.


I've used the Rustoleum epoxy before, but was disappointed in both the gloss and the "hot tire" pickup, which is supposedly guaranteed not to happen.


Any real-world recommendations for something that holds up, with good gloss, that won't get the hot tire pickup?
 

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Tim - The Northwest 1969 Camaro
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I have been in many industrial settings (semiconductor fabs, food plants, etc.) that have something commercial on the floor that will resist fork lift tire marks. I don't have a brand name unfortunately but if you have an Industrial Finishes or the like in your area I would check with them. I don't think the retail/residential products are tough enough to meet your requirements.
 

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I just did a 800 SqFt garage with the Rustoluem RockSolid stuff, different than their epoxy. It's only been a couple weeks. I used that older epoxy on another floor about 12 years ago now. I had the same problems you did. This stuff has way more gloss and it's a thicker build. I spent nearly $700 on this. I shopped commercial epoxy and it was at least $1500 for material. For the cost we'll see how this goes.
 

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Al - Waterloo, Iowa
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Don't paint until the concrete is FULLY cured. That doesn't mean the week or 2
the concrete guys will tell you to wait before driving on it. Around here we have
a company called Stetson Products that supply all the builders and concrete guys.
They do sell to the general public. If you have a similar business near by go talk
with them. I have used a clear sealer from them with good luck. That is applied
a day or so after the pour. It seals and slows down the curing process. The slower
the cure the better. I also have used industrial epoxy from Sherwin Williams with
limited success (fork lift traffic). I have also used the standard Rustoleum epoxy
paint for mostly foot traffic areas (some pallet truck) with pretty good results.
 

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I did both my attached unconditioned garage and my conditioned detached with the Rustolium. Two entirely different results. The detached floor was acid cleaned and I heated several days about 80 degrees and then heated it after the stuff was down. No hot tire problems or other. The attached was just cleaned with water and air dryed. It needs to be redone. Hot tire pulls and areas just flaking off.
 

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https://armorpoxy.com/

I've had very good luck with products from this company on multiple applications. If you don't want it slick then you have to put an additive in the final coat. Wait for 6 months before applying to new concrete. It has to fully cure and gas off or you get bubbles. Easily fixed with a weed burner while curing but a big pain in the a$$.
 

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Eastwood makes a good product and as mentioned the floor needs to fully cure before coating. Fully cured according to the team that poured my concrete is at least 4-6 months.
 

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I just re-did my garage and used the Sherwin Williams Commercial Epoxy Coating - Armorseal 8100. Came out beautiful! Much more expensive than the Rustoleum crap, but holding up much much better so far and did not fade out like the rustoleum did. What you see here is 2 coats of the 8100 color. For high gloss, you would have to topcoat with a clear sealer. Last pic was the before
 

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X2 on Armorpoxy.

This is a commercial product that is used in car dealerships and hangers. Not cheap but you get what you pay for. You can see pictures on their website.

I applied Armorpoxy on my shop that I transformed from a horse stable.
They provide a sealer/primer that is applied first (most econo sealers skip this step)
Also check out garageforum to see anything and everything about shops/garages.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks guys...I'll check these out...

Broke ground yesterday...hoping to have the concrete poured by the new year, if the temp holds...otherwise, I might have ot wait until spring, which means waiting until September or so before I can apply a floor coating!
 

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I was reading about what is the best paint to use for the underside of my car. I never heard about one of the paints that I found. It was made from a chemical compound called aliphatic polyurethane.

So I looked up those two 50 cent words. This type of paint was originally developed to be used outside on sidewalks and building walls. It is resistant to graffiti. It does not yellow with UV rays. People also put it down on warehouse floors because it is scratch resistant and resists hot tire marks. It is flexible so it is impact resistant. It has superior resistance to gas and oil and other chemicals. It won't sweat in high humidity conditions. It has lots of color choices.

I bought some of this stuff that was tailored to be used on the bottom of my car. It is tough. Paint stripper is ineffective it after it dries. It is flexible. I painted my seat springs and it does not flake off when I compress them.

So why do people use epoxy on concrete floors? Well, epoxy sticks better than aliphatic polyurethane. Epoxy will fill little holes better than the other on the floor. Epoxy is not very impact resistant. Have you ever noticed on an epoxy floor that has little chips out of the paint? Possibly something was dropped and the paint chipped off and exposed the concrete.

Painting a concrete floor is like painting your car. Your car has different types of paints sprayed on in layers. The bottom one is a primer that could be epoxy. The top one could be a clear coat.

If money is no object and you want the best garage floor for miles around, you have to paint it like your car. The first coat is an epoxy and the top coat is the aliphatic polyurethane.
 

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I've used Rustoleum PROFESSIONAL Epoxy floor coating on 5 different floors over the past 16 years and never experienced 'hot tire pickup' .. it's all still in place!

My recommendation regardless of which product you choose:

"Follow ALL of the manufacturer's recommendations.. to the letter"

1. The concrete needs to CURE totally (could take 2-4 months).
2. Clean the floor thoroughly... Acid ETCH the floor, and RINSE thoroughly.
3) After etching/rinsing, Allow the floor to DRY Thoroughly.. 3-5 days in heat of summer (MUCH longer in winter ).
4) After applying... WAIT several days to a week before driving on it.
 

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I used Epoxy-Coat on 2 different floors and have been happy with the results. Even with good material, the sticking power and durability all comes from the prep work. Acid wash is not as good as having someone grind the floor for your prep, and when you compare the cost and time it's money well spent IMHO.

Polishing the floor and staining would be other options to think about.
 

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I just did my floor about 20 months ago. My floor guy, a chemical engineer grad, used a Poly-Aspartic finish. It's tough, and holds up well. I have dumped gas, oil, paint, brake fluid, and beer on it. No issues, everything just wipes right up. Easy clean up, does not stain from dirt, and most everything just washes away. I recommend considering it.
 
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