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Where did you mount your regulator??

  • In the engine bay somewhere

    Votes: 11 55.0%
  • In the rear between the tank and the axle

    Votes: 5 25.0%
  • In the rear to the side of the tank

    Votes: 1 5.0%
  • In the rear in front of the axle

    Votes: 2 10.0%
  • Other (please comment below)

    Votes: 1 5.0%
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I mounted mine on the passengers side rear frame rail up high to clear my rear sway bar. Its a little tight and I had to use a couple 90s but I wanted it on that side so I could run the new hose in the stock location. Might be better a little lower if there is room.
 

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You want it as close to the tank as possible. Also plan the mounting of the vents as high as possible
 

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In my opinion the fuel filter should be as close to the tank as possible. On the regulator it depends on whether it has a return line or not. If it does not have a return I would mount it in the engine bay. If it has a return I probably would make a bracket to mount it in front of the tank.
 

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The Covette Filter and regulator is an all in one part
 

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I am just at the process of getting my tank ready for assembly and my bypass regulator also has a vacuum port on it that goes to the manifold. Where would you guys mount this type - Close to the tank with a long vacuum line or in the engine bay with a long fuel line return? Or do I just block off the vacuum port?
 

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I am just at the process of getting my tank ready for assembly and my bypass regulator also has a vacuum port on it that goes to the manifold. Where would you guys mount this type - Close to the tank with a long vacuum line or in the engine bay with a long fuel line return? Or do I just block off the vacuum port?
If your not boosting just leave the port open. My preference is closer to tank and shorter return line.
 

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I'm doing an LSA swap in my 68 and will be using a boost referenced regulator. Mine's going to be under the hood similar to this.

If you're going to be NA, I'd just leave the port open and run it close to your tank.
 

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If your not boosting just leave the port open. My preference is closer to tank and shorter return line.
I'm doing an LSA swap in my 68 and will be using a boost referenced regulator. Mine's going to be under the hood similar to this.

If you're going to be NA, I'd just leave the port open and run it close to your tank.
Didn't know you can leave the port open. My thoughts initially were to mount it close to the tank for a shorter fuel return - much cleaner plus that much more chance of a vapor lock situation eliminated. Thx guys
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I mounted mine on the passengers side rear frame rail up high to clear my rear sway bar. Its a little tight and I had to use a couple 90s but I wanted it on that side so I could run the new hose in the stock location. Might be better a little lower if there is room.
Jeff, I really like the way you did this, I may do the same. : )
 

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Didn't pay attention to the forum this was in. Won't be much use on an LS sorry guys. :eek:
It's the same either way.

If under the hood the return line's quite a bit longer.

For boosted I believe a short vac line to the reg is better so I would suggest under the hood for that reason on a boosted car.

If LS the vac line is not needed for boosted as the MAF and MAP do the job
 

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Here are a few key items to consider.

Since a regulator is meant to control fuel pressure it should be closest to the engine as possible. Lines, fittings etc. cause a pressure drop, so being mounted closest to the engine gives the best pressure control. Not the easiest method, but the best.

The Vette filter/regulator is the easiest, but not necessarily the most accurate way to control pressure. It also does not give you the ability to adjust pressure or vacuum/boost reference the system. For a stock LS swap it works ok, but I never recommend it for a boosted application. Mounted in the rear, it offers the easiest & cheapest way to plumb a system, but it has its limitations in anything beyond a relatively stock engine.

A non-return style regulator was mentioned above... this has no place in a fuel injected application.
Carb applications just need pressure control to prevent overload of the needle/seat in the float bowl.

For the LSA swap mentioned above... fuel pressure is originally controlled by a pulse width modulated fuel pump. If you are not running the pump, lines & controller from the factory application, you should consider a boost referenced regulator to better control the pressure & not run out of injector due to insufficient fuel pressure.
 

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Although not EFI here, I like the regulator near the motor for adjusting pressure. (do not mount on firewall if you ever plan to hit the dragstrip)
Now, that being said, how often do you adjust fuel pressure once set ;)

In a boosted app, I agree with it being close to the motor to prevent a possible lean spike due to it not reacting quick enough.
 

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I mounted mine near the fuel tank on the underside of the trunk floor. The tank is at the top of the pic with the diff cover at the bottom left.

Corvette Fuel Filter/Regulator plumbed:



I fabricated a bracket for the Tanks Inc. check valve. This closes the fuel vent incase you flip the car over, so the fuel won't pour out:



I mounted it behind the license plate up high and out of the way. I T'd into the existing fuel vent that is on the RideTech filler neck:
 
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