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sticky ???


Temperature ratings — The letter signifies how well a tire resists heat: A — best, B — intermediate, C — acceptable.
Traction — Letters indicate how well a tire will grip the road surface. Each tire is rated AA, A, B, or C. An AA-rated tire offers the maximum grip.
Speed ratings — The letter designates the maximum speed in miles per hour under specific service conditions: M — 81, N — 87, P — 93, Q — 100, R — 106, S — 112, T — 118, H — 130, V — 149, W — 168, Y — 186
Load indexes — A number that corresponds to the weight that the tire can accommodate. Some examples are: 74 — 827 pounds, 81 — 1019 pounds, 95 - 1521 pounds, 105 — 2039 pounds, 113 — 2535 pounds, 120 — 3086 pounds, 124 — 3527 pounds, 129 — 4079 pounds, 133 — 4541 pounds, 137 — 5071 pounds, 140 — 5512 pounds, 143 — 6008 pounds, 146 — 6614 pounds, 149 — 7165 pounds
 

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temp ratings, speed ratings and the tread wear rating, just so everyone knows, is not an industry number, it is a manufacture grade. Meaning a Bridgestone with an A temp, b traction, and an 300 treadwear, can not be crossed with a Goodyear or any other brand, and viceaversa
 

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I agree, wear, temp & traction are virtually meaningless data. Michelin was the last company to 'inflate' the wear number. The MXV series had lie a 160 rating, a solid 40-50k tire. But they caved to marketing, bumped it to like 300 or 320 with no other change in the tire (according to my Michelin rep).

I think speed rating offers some insight into tire capability. Load rating is a big deal for trucks.
 
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