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Does anyone have any experience what is takes to get a classic car (pre-emmissions) from Canada into the US? What are the procedures, likely costs, customs, etc. THANKS!!
 

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A friend of mine just brought a COPO Canadian car in to the US and he told me all he had to pay was a small import fee. You should check with US Customs at the port of entry for the specifics. Make sure you talk to the people at the port you are going to bring the car to for import and be specific and get names. Although they are all the same outfit, they somtimes do things differently from port to port. Should be a snap, since the car originated in the US.
Jim
 

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GM JIM hit it almost on the spot. In the 60's and 70's, US vehicle safety and emissions standards were higher than a number of other countries. So, if the car was built to US standards and then exported, no problem when returning it to the U.S. The problem that you may run into is the vehicle emissions. Many exported vehicles did not have smog pumps and the related hardware because the country of import did not require them. GM, like any other business tries to reduce costs whenever possible. I worked for U.S. Customs during the late 80's and export and import of vehicles to Europe was one of the areas that I was involved in. So, to sum this up, you need to check with U.S. Customs to ensure that the vehicle you want to import meets the safety and emissions standards for that year and model. Depending on the age of the vehicle, you can get a waiver. A 1st Gen Camaro should not be a problem but I wouldn't promise you that. Good Luck
 

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In the 60's and 70's, emissions was a factor. I'm pretty sure all they will be concerned with now will be seatbelt and bumper standards. I don't think emissions will be a factor for a 30 plus year old car. My friend brought his car in at the Peace Bridge in Niagara Falls New York and they didn't even come outside to look at it. However, as I said earlier, check with Customs where you are going to cross. Don't call the National number. Speak with someone at the point at which you will be crossing and get their name. This way, when they ask "Who told you that?" you can tell them. Nobody can screw things up better than the Government.
Jim
 

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If the car was U.S.-built and is 25 years old, it's a piece of cake; I brought mine in three years ago, U.S. Customs needed the Bill of Sale and the Canadian Registration and $5.00 for an "Informal Entry Certificate", and that was it. You'll need the Customs Certificate along with the Canadian Registration in order to register the car with your state DMV and get a new title. Best to call ahead to the U.S. Customs office at the border crossing you're going to use to make sure you have everything they need. Biggest pain is the fifty truck drivers standing in line all the way down the hall to get their Broker's papers signed off; Customs took pity on me as an individual and had me come to the front of the line :D
 
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