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Discussion Starter #1
Hi my headleiner has 2 small holes in it
about the size of quarter form mice. Other
than that it is perfect is there any way I can patch it even if its only for the summer? I need to put my money into other areas of the car first.

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Headliner is about $59 or so. Dont buy the covered sail panels as you can do them yourself and the quality will be better IMHO. I also kept the factory sunvisors and re-used them rather than recover them since they were fine. I have a set of instructions including tips that I will post below if you need them.

-Mark.

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The headliner was not difficult but I have some very valuable tips that you will not get from a book. Print this out or save for reference.

Start by disconnecting the battery or just the courtesy light fuse. Begin by removing all the stuff that screws into the roof and bag together the pieces with the hardware. Pull the roof rail windlacing off and the front and rear windlacing as well. It helps to have the front and rear glass out to do this job but it can be done with it still installed. Cut out the old headliner and you will notice there are support rods set into holes on the side structure. You must label the rods so you know the order they go back into the car front to rear. You must also label the holes they came out of before you remove them as there are 3 different sets of holes. I used a black magic marker on the sides of the roof for this. Masking tape on the roof bows for lables. Polish off the surface rust on the bows to help the new headliner slide better at asembly/adjustment time.

The new headliner will be labled "front" and will have a centerline. Cut a small "V" on the front and back to help find the center from looking at the other side. Here are the best tips I have for the headliner. Buy 4 boxes of medium size sheet metal paperclips that look like butterflies from the office supply store. You will realy need 4 dozen. All fasteners for anything that attaches to the roof should be installed at this time to help you find the holes after the headliner is installed. You will install the headliner over them and feel around with your fingers for them after the headliner is in place.

You need to buy 3M lighter duty headliner glue. Start with installing the bows into the headliner then put the center bow in the roof first. You will need to scrunch the headliner on both sides as it will be too long for the bows. Install all the bows in thier original locations and starting from the center bow. The white plastic bow center retainers can be soaked in a cup of hot water to make them pliable before installing the bows.

Start trimming back the listings a small amout at a time. Do a small amount on one side, then do the same bow on the other side. Use the paper clamps to attach the headliner to the metal edges on the sides of the car. Another trick here is to cut a slit in the liner on both sides of the listing about 1/4" away from each seam. This will give you a tab to pull on while you are adjusting the listings with a razor blade or scissors. You want to pull out most all the wrinkles to get a clean job. The listings need to be intact within 1" of the ends of the bows in order for the roof to look right when finished.

There is a tacking strip on the inside of the sail panel. You will need a staple gun to attach the material there. Always remember to work out the wrinkles as you go.

When you have the sides nice and tight and where you want them, you can glue them to the metal edges. Do one side at a time using the paperclamps. When both sides are done, you work on the front and rear. Pull the material tight as you glue and clamp it to the metal edjing. If all goes well at this point, you are home free.

Recover the side earmuff sail panel covers with the material provided and the headliner glue. The grain needs to go the same direction as it did originaly so pay attention to it. If your cardboard is rotten, you can make new ones or buy replacements. The retainers are the same as for the inner door panels. If you need to make new panels, you will need to transfer the old retainer clips to the new replacement panels. I cut the old ones out leaving a square hole and used the old panlels to mark the locations on the new panels. 3M black weatherstrip adhesive worked well here. Just push the retainers into the sail panels and they are done.

After the glue has dried on the metal edjes, remove the paperclamps and install the windlacing. Feel with your fingers to find the fasteners and cut tiny slits for the screws. Attach the coat hooks, shoulder belts, sunvisors etc. and you are done. If your visors need recovering, I would have it done by an apholstery shop. Mine were fine so I just reinstalled them.

Any remaining wrinkles will be worked out by careful heating and/or steam. Cut off any excess material and that is it.

Hope this is not too much information. This was my first headliner and I am glad I did it myself. Very satisfying.

Good luck!
 

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I am with Mark all the way on this one. It is not that difficult if you take your time, and especially if you use the binding clips. Upholstery shops charge by the hour, so most people are not willing to pay for a "perfect job" that takes a day to do.

I was 100% satisfied with the quality of my PUI headliner, but the sail panels did not look right at all. The grain was going the wrong way, which looked out of place to say the least. I also kept the sunvisors as is, and used the extra material to cover the sail panels. This was my first headliner install too.

I took many pictures of mine along the way, which you can see by clicking here, and there are lots of other tips I included for interior restoration as well.

Good Luck!

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Craig Wood
1969 Camaro RS/SS
 

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I agree with Mark he has done a good job here of doing the install.
I did mine myself also about two months ago and was the first "bow type" I ever did. I've done a few foam ones.
I used wooden clothspins instead of metal clips for temporary holding on the front and sides and they worked good.
Make sure you use the 3M head liner glue as they make a couple of grades and not every parts house has the real stuff.
I recovered my sail panels also which broke when I pulled them out so I traced the shape on a piece of aluminum (about .040 thick) and used this for my sail panels and glued the material right to the aluminum with the head liner glue. They won't break again ! and the trim holds them in place.
Whole job took about 8 hours but it came out good. I read if it looks decent when you first do it, it will get better with age. Don't worry about getting all the wrinkles out.
Good Luck
 

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Wow Craig and Mark, those are great tips. Craig I bookmarked you site as I will be doing my interior in the near future and plan on using your site as reference.

Thanks!!
 

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Ditto Jonesy....
Craigs site is the first Camaro site I found on the net after I bought my 69 and I used to 'live' on the forums there until they went south a long time ago.
I've always been impressed by Craigs 'documentary' of his restoration. Tons of great info and links to everything he talks about. Way to go Craig and Mark! And thanks!

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Joe
WCA Member
1969 Wallet Crusher
- [email protected]
- [email protected]
My neverending project!

[This message has been edited by HwyStarJoe (edited 06-23-2002).]
 

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Thanks for the praise guys - always like to help out anyway that I can. I wish I had more time to do more website related info, but I just don't have the time anymore. With no funding and all of it being done on my own time - I find it hard to fit into my schedule these days. I do have another site ready to go, but I have to track down a new server so I can get off of geocities.

I have an automatic trim tag/protecto plate decoder that I wrote, and I will most likely post here for everyone to debug for me. Basically, you fill out the information on a picture that looks like an actual trim tag, and the program calculates everything it can based on the info provided, and provides a printable copy that you can take along with you when your are checking out that "potential find".

I will be finishing my Camaro in early August and will be moving onto the next shortly after..

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Craig Wood
1969 Camaro RS/SS
 
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